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Full text of "Minutes of the organization of the Liberty Baptist Association"

WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 




CALL NO. 




1930-193U 



NOT TO BE 



E0 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/minutesoforganiz3034libe 



m 




LIBERTY BAPTIST j 
ASSOCIATION 



NINETY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

HELD WITH 

Abbotts Creek Baptist Church 
High Point, North Carolina 

R. F. D. No. 4 

September 9-10, 1930 



The Next Session Will be Held Tuesday and Wednesday 
After the First Sunday in September, 1931, 
With the Lick Creek Baptist Church 
High Rock, N. C. 
R. F. D. No. 1 



NORTH CAROLINA 



1930 



3b 



VAICE K>R€ST UNfVfRSITfr 



LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

NORTH CAROLINA 

NINETY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

HELD WITH 

Abbotts Creek Baptist Church 
High Point, North Carolina 

R. F. D. No. 4 

September 9-10, 1930 

The Next Session Will be Held Tuesday and Wednesday 
After the First Sunday in September, 1931, 
With the Lick Creek Baptist Church 
High Rock, N. C. 
R. F. D. No. 1 

1930 



2 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



INDEX 

Section Page 

Asst. Pastors and Educational Directors 25 

Auxiliaries — Associational 3 

Church Directories 25 

Church Clerks 38 

Church Treasurers 39 

Churches and Messengers 4 

Committees — Executive 33 3 

Finance 9 8 

On Nominations 9 8 

On Co-operative Work 9 8 

Program for 1931 33 22 

Reports in 1931, Chairmen 33-36 22-23 

On Time, Place and Preacher 9 8 

Constitution 28 

Co-operative Program Apportionment 35 23 

Co-operative Program 13 8 

Delegates — State Baptist Convention 33 22 

Delegates — Southern Baptist Convention 33 22 

Deceased Members 25 17 

Directories — Associational 3 

Church 38-39 

B. Y. P. U 3 

Ordained Ministers 25 

W. M. S 3 

Historical Table of Association 29-30 

Ministers — Ordained 25 

Minute Fund Apportionment 35 23 

Officers — Associational 4 3 

Organization 4 6 

Orphanage Representative 33 22 

Pastors of Association 2^ 

Reports — Biblical Recorder, Religious Literature 6 

B. Y. P. U 29 2 

Committee on Nominations 33 2 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher.... 15 1 

Committee on State of Churches 2 

Committee on Finance 35 2 

Education 17 1 

Foreign Missions 22 1 

Hospitals 21 1 

Home Missions 13 

Memorials 25 1 

Ministerial Relief 23 1 

Orphanage 14 1 

State of Churches 24 1 

State Missions 13 

Sunday Schools 30 2 

Treasurer 34 2 

Woman's Work 28 1 

Resolution of Thanks 37 2 

Sermon — Annual 7 

Sheets Memorial Church (Received into body) 8-12 7- 

Sunday School Superintendents 3 

Visitors 

W. M. U. — Auxiliaries and Officers 26-2 

Proceedings of Annual Meeting... 3 

Wallburg Church — (In regard to 1929 Report) 24-31 16-2 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 



DIRECTORY OF ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

Archibald Johnson, Moderator Thomasville, N. C. 

G. W. Miller, Vice-Moderator Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Clerk Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Treasurer Lexington, N. C. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. M. Hayes, Chairman Lexington, N. C. 

C. C. Wrenn Southmont, N. C. 

L. E. Teague Thomasville, N. C. 

D. S. Hayworth High Point, N. C, R. 4 

A. L. Snider .Denton, N. C. 

W. H. Lomax Linwood, N. C, R. 2 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES TO REPORT IN 1931 

State of Churches — M. O. Alexander, Thomasville, N. C. 
Home Missions — J. A. McMillan, Thomasville, N. C. 
Religious Literature, Recorder — B. K. Mason, Winston-Salem. 
Baptist Hospitals — Ronald Wall, Lexington, N. C. 
State Missions — E. F. Mumford, Wallburg, N. C. 
B. Y. P. U. — Miss Elizabeth Smith, Linwood, N. C. 
Christian Education — J. M. Hayes, Lexington, N. C. 
Foreign Missions — H. T. Penry ? Southmont, N. C. 
Ministerial Relief — G. A. Martin, Denton, N. C. 
Woman's Work — Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 
Sunday Schools — A. J. Newton, Lexington, N. C. 
Orphanage — Walter Wafford, Southmont, N. C. 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 
B. Y. P. U. 

Meeting was held with the church at Stoners Grove June 29, 
1930. 

President — Miss Elizabeth Smith, Linwood, N. C. 
Secretary — Miss Sarah Bishop, Erlanger, N. C. 

W. M. U. 

Meeting was held with the church at Holloways August 19, 
1930. 

Superintendent — Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 
Associate Supt. — Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Miss Esther Newton, Thomasville. 
Junior Supt. — Miss Mary Misenheimer, Lexington, N. C. 
Personal Service Chairman — Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Thomas- 
ville, N. C. 

Mission Study Chairman — Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem. 
SUNDAY SCHOOL 

Have no associational Sunday School convention. 
Member State Mission Board — Dr. M. L. Kesler, Thomasville. 
Delegate to Baptist State Convention — G. A. Martin, Denton. 
Delegate to Southern Baptist Convention — H. T. Penry, 
Southmont. 

WAKE «3KEST UNIVERSITY 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS 
Located Within the Association 
The Mills Home — Established 1885 
Superintendent — Dr. M. L. Kesler, Thomasville, N. C. 
Trustees : 

B. W. Spilman, Kinston, N. C, chairman. 

Thos. Carrick, High Point, N. C, secretary. 

Term expiring 1930 — W. A. Cooper, Raleigh; J. H. Canady, 
Kinston; L. L. Leary, Morehead City; R. L. Moore, Mars Hill. 

Term expiring 1931 — B. W. Spilman, Kinston; C. L. Haywood, 
Durham; T. P. Pruitt, Hickory; Mrs. Fannie Moore, Gastonia. 

Term expiring 1932 — I. G. Greer, Boone; H. S. Stokes, Win- 
ston-Salem; Mrs. Bryon C. Scott, Charlotte; J. D. Proctor, Lum- 
berton; John D. Biggs, Raleigh; E. Y. Webb, Shelby; J. E. Allen, 
Warrenton; J. M. Broughton, Raleigh. 

Term expiring 1933 — T. B. Wheeler, Scotland Neck; J. W. 
Noell, Roxboro; Thos. Carrick, High Point; J. B. Stroud, Greens- 
boro; A. E. Tate, High Point. 



Associational missionary or other paid employee — None. 

Standing committees — None. 

Representative of laymen's movement — None. 

The auxiliary meetings — The association has no W. M. U. 
Auxiliary, Sunday School Convention, B. Y. P. U. or Laymen's 
Convention, which meets at the same time or during the sessions 
of the association. 



LIST OF MESSENGERS — 1930 SESSIONS 

ABBOTTS CREEK — C. H. Teague, C. E. Spurgeon, Floyd 
Teague, Carrick Teague, Clarence Moore, 

CENTER HILL— John Jarrett, W. J. Beck, R. B. Sheets, Clif- 
ford Hunt, Sam Jarrett, Holt Brown. 

CHURCHLAND— W. H. Lomax, Mrs. W. H. Lomax, D. R. 
Kesler, B. R. Berrier, Mrs. W. A. Beeker. 

DENTON — Lee Tysinger, A. L. Snider, Dr. C. E. Clyatt, Rev. 
G. A. Martin, J. J. Snider, Mrs. J. J. Snider, Lucy Snider, Estella 
Newsom. 

GRAVEL HILL— Sam Scarlett. 

HOLLOWAYS — W. E. Shirley, T. L. Palmer, Frank Tysinger, 
Willie Smith, B. R. Cross, W. H. Johnson. 

JERSEY— W. C. Roach, I. A. Sharpe, Charlie Smith, R. L. 
Palmer, Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Sadie Sharpe. 

LEXINGTON— C. M. Wall, G. W. Miller, Sam J. Smith, Rev. 
Ronald Wall, H. C. Myers, J. L. Bullard, Dr. C. R. Sharpe, P. A. 
Myers, Mrs. D. F. Conrad, Mrs. D. S. Bennett, Mrs. B. F. Lee, 
Mrs. Sam J .Smith, Prof. S. G. Hasty, P. M. Clarke, Miss Roxie 
Sheets, Mrs P. A. Myers, B. F. Lee, Mrs. L. A. Martin, Mrs. J. 
M. Hayes, C. E. Gallimore, Mrs. S. G. Hasty. 

LIBERTY— H P. May, N. T. Kindley, C. H. Sowers, Mrs. N. 
T. Kindley. 

LICK CREEK— A. M. Cole, Mrs. A. M. Cole, J. A. Kinney, 
David Kinney, B. C. Cole, E. R. Bean, J. E. Skeen. 

MILLS HOME— Mrs. M. L. Kesler, R. D. Covington, Mrs. H. 
L. Swaim, Miss Sallie McCracken, Miss Willie Sherman, Miss 
Hattie Edwards, Miss Annie Hall. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Elmer Snider, Conrad F. Motsinger, 
Maskey M. Smith, Mrs. Henry Wilson, Mrs. Conrad F. Motsinger, 
Mrs. Maskey M. Smith. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



REEDS — J. N. Myers, I. A. Myers, L. H. Craver, Mrs. Alda 
Craver, Mrs. Golden Koontz, Mrs. Minnie Snider. 

RICH FORK — Jake Kanoy, Stimp Everhart, Willie Bowers, 
T. H. Small, R. L. West, Mrs. R. L. West, Geo. T. Everhart. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL — Lester Love, Mary Swing, Rosa Mor- 
ris, Kelley Potts, B. T. Privett, C. T. Cooper. 

SMITH GROVE — Rev. E. L. Bradley, J. R. Grubb, Miss Ruth 
Snider, Miss Biddie Snider, Miss Grula Orrell. 

SOUTHSIDE— R. S. Basinger, Mrs. R. S. Basinger, Rev. E. 
H. Mullis, W. J. Hagler, Mrs. W. J. Hagler, Joe Godfrey, W. P. 
Workman, Mrs. W. P. Workman. 

STONERS GROVE— Mrs. W. S. Beckner, Mrs. H. T. Penry, 
Walter L. Wafford, Robert Barnes, Mrs. L. E. Lookablil, Mrs. 
A. F. Wafford. 

SUMMERVILLE — Timp Bean, Lucy Tysinger, L. C. Carrick, 
J. L. Carrick, Creola Carrick, Myrtle Carrick, G. L. Frank. 

TABERNACLE — I. L. Blaylock, Mrs. B. L. Hames, Mrs. L. A. 
Carswell. 

TAYLORS GROVE— Miss Remell West, Mrs. Pansy Gandy, 
JVIr. and Mrs. J. R. Brewer, Mrs. J. M. Coggins, Rev. and Mrs. 
Mack Caldwell. 

THOMASVILLE — Archibald Johnson, M. 0. Alexander, L. E. 
Teague, W. G. Fitzgerald, Mrs. R. S. Green, Monroe Bean, C. M. 
Howell, Miss Lois Johnson, J. R. Blair, Z. V. Crutchfield, Pre- 
vette Westmoreland. 

WALLBURG— Miss Etta Teague, C. R. Dodson, G. W. Wall, 
J. B. Motsinger, Mrs. J. B. Motsinger, C. C. Smith. 

WALTERS GROVE. 

WELCOME— W. S. Disher, Mrs. W. S. Disher, E. S. Craver, 
J. F. Crotts, Mrs. E. C. Roach, Rev. E. C. Roach, R. L Davis, 
Mrs R. L. Davis, Mrs. W. F. Brinkley. 

WESTFIELD. 



VISITORS ENROLLED 

Rev. B. K. Mason, Winston-Salem, N. C, representative of the 
budget plan of subscriptions to the Biblical Recorder. 

Rev. J. W. Partridge, Birmingham, Ala., Birmingham Associa- 
tion. 

Rev. V. M. Swaim, Pilot Mountain Association. 
Rev. J. W. Carter, Pilot Mountain Association. 
Rev. Herman Stevens, Raleigh, N. C, field representative 
Baptist State Convention. 

Rev. E. N. Gardner, Little River Association. 

Rev. Geo. Tunstil, Piedmont Association. 

Rev. B. G. Early, representative of Biblical Recorder. 

Bro. C. A. Smith, moderator Piedmont Association. 

Rev. J. M. Hillard, vice-moderator Piedmont Association. 

Dr. A. B. Conrad, pastor First Baptist Church, High Point. 

NEW PASTORS ENROLLED 

Rev. C. R. Johnson, Erlanger, N. C, pastor Tabernacle church. 
Rev. B. K. Mason, Winston-Salem, N. C, pastor New Friend- 
ship Church. 

Rev. G. A. Martin, Denton, N. C, pastor Denton, Center Hill 
and Gravel Hill churches. 

Rev. E. M. Turner, Mocksville, N. C, pastor Reeds church. 
Rev. S. B. Wilson, High Point, N. C, pastor Lick Creek church. 



6 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS 
of the 

Ninety-Eighth Annual Session of the 
Liberty Baptist Association 
Held With the 
Abbotts Creek Baptist Church 
High Point, N. C, R. F. D. No. 4 



FIRST DAY 

1. The ninety-eighth annual session of the Liberty Baptist 
Association convened with the Abbotts Creek Cnurch, High 
Point, N. C, R. F. D. No. 4, Tuesday, September 9, 1930, at 
10:30 A. M. 

2. Devotional service was led by Rev. Ronald Wall, who used 
for the Scripture lesson the 17th chapter of John. The opening 
prayer was also led by Rev. Ronald Wall, of Lexington, N. C. 

3. Archibald Johnson, moderator, calls the convention to order 
for the transaction of business. 

4. Archibald Johnson, of Thomasville, N. C, is elected mod- 
erator by acclamation. 

G, W. Miller, of Lexington, N. C, is elected vice-moderator 
and Sam J. Smith, of Lexington, N. C, is elected clerk and 
treasurer. 

5. Rev. M. L. Kesler reads the report of the Executive Com- 
mittee. On motion to adopt, remarks are made concerning the 
report by Rev. M. L. Kesler and it is voted by the body that fur- 
ther discussion of the report be made in connection with the 
Report on State of the Churches. The report is adopted. 

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Through your committee the General Board has aided South- 
side church in Thomasville for a part of the year. But Pastor 
L. A. Connell found it impossible to hold on to the work, so aid 
from the board was discontinued. While he was with them the 
work was greatly strengthened and stabilized. Much interest has 
been developed under the leadership of Rev. R. L. West, but no 
help has been given from the General Board. 

At the beginning of the year work was begun in South Lexing- 
ton with Brother H. T. Penry as our missionary. The only avail- 
able place for worship was the public school auditorium. This 
has been used up to the present time. As a result of his regular 
ministry and a revival of considerable interest, on August 10 a 
church was organized to be known as the Sheets Memorial, in 
honor of Brother Henry Sheets of blessed memory. 

At one time we thought we were developing several fields 
among the country churches. Little remains as a result of such 
an effort. Too many of our churches are served by preachers 
who live in other associations. No progress in better combinations 
can be expected so long as this practice continues. The church 
and the preacher who allow it, constitute the chief stumbling 
block to progress among our rural churches. 

M. L. KESLER, for the Committee. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



6. Rev. J. A. McMillan reads the Report on Periodicals (The 
Biblical Recorder). On motion to adopt, the report is ably dis- 
cussed by Rev. B. K. Mason, who urged that the Recorder be 
placed in the church budget. Further discussion is made by 
Rev. B. G. Early in a very apt and convincing manner. The re- 
port is adopted. 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS 

In presenting the report on periodicals we mention the Biblical 
Recorder first because it is the organ of the Baptist State Con- 
vention of North Carolina. Week by week it comes to our homes 
to inform us about the work in our state. It is essential to the 
progressive pastor and lay-worker. One reason for the backward- 
ness of so many of our churches is that the pastor does not take 
and read the Biblical Recorder. More than three hundred Bap- 
tist preachers in North Carolina do not take the Biblical Recorder 
and are therefore uninformed and are of little use as denomina- 
tional builders. 

Charity and Children is the organ of Mills Home. It is a paper 
for everyone — not just a paper for children, though published 
in the interest of children. Charity and Children is due a large 
part of the credit for the widespread interest in the Mills Home 
on the part of the Baptists of our state. It is and has always 
been loyal to every phase of our denominational work. 

Home and Foreign Fields, monthly periodical published by the 
Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, gives 
a world view of Kingdom work. This great magazine brings us 
the news from the far-flung battle line of Baptist endeavors. 

Royal Service is the textbook of organized Baptist work. To 
commend Royal Service would be as to commend a missionary 
organization in the church. 

In addition to the above mentioned periodicals there are many 
others, concerned with different phases of our Baptist work, 
which can be had from our Sunday School Board in Nashville, 
Tenn., and from our Baptist Book Shop in Raleigh. May our 
people realize more and more the vital importance of keeping in 
touch with the great movements of our denomination through 
the medium of our splendid publications. 

Respectfully submitted, 

j. a. McMillan. 

7. The body is led in prayer at this time by Rev. Geo. Tunstil, 
pastor Green Street Baptist Church, High Point, N. C. 

INTRODUCTORY SERMON 

Rev. M. L. Kesler, superintendent of Mills Home, Thomasville, 
N. C, preaches the introductory sermon, using as his text, Mat- 
thew 20:16, his subject being, "Whosoever Wants to be Great, 
Must be the Servant of All." 

The sermon was ably delivered and well received by the large 
congregation present. 

8. Rev. Ronald Wall at this time presents a letter from the 
Sheets Memorial Church, which was recently organized and asks 
that said church be received as a member of the Liberty Asso- 
ciation. 

The moderator appoints as a committee to investigate the 
application, Rev. M. 0. Alexander, Rev. J. M. Hayes and Rev. M. 
L. Kesler. 



8 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES BY MODERATOR 

The moderator at this time announces the appointment of the 
following committees : 

On Digest of Church Letters: John Arch McMillan, M. O. 
Alexander, Grover Calmer. 

On Finance: R. D. Covington, G. W. Miller, C. H. Teague. 

On Time, Place and Preacher: G. W. Wal], L. E. Teague, J. M. 
Hayes. 

On Nominations: M. L. Kesler, E. F. Mumford, C. C. Wrenn. 
On Co-operative Work: M. 0. Alexander, J. D. Newton, C. M. 
Wall. 

10. The association adjourns at 12:15 P. M. to reconvene at 
1:30 P. M. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

11. The association reconvened at 1:45 P. M. 

Rev. G. A. Martin, of Denton, conducts the devotional; prayer 
by Rev. R. L. West, Thomasville, N. C. 

12. The committee heretofore appointed by the moderator to 
investigate the application of Sheets Memorial Church for mem- 
bership into the association, recommend that the church be re- 
ceived into full fellowship of the body. 

After remarks by Rev. J. M. Hayes, Lexington, N. C, con- 
cerning the work at this place, the recommendation of the com- 
mittee is adopted by the association. 

The delegates from this church are welcomed into the body 
and are given the right hand of fellowship. 

13. Fred R. Poplin reads the report on State Missions. On 
motion to adopt the report, remarks are made by Fred R. Poplin. 

The Report on Home Missions is read at this time by Rev. H. 
T. Penry. On motion to adoptj the two reports along with the 
Co-operative Program are ably discussed by Rev. Herman Ste- 
vens and Rev. E. N. Gardner. 

Both reports are adopted. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

North Carolina Baptists are this year completing one hundred 
years of organized effort. At the very beginning our fathers 
made plans for evangelizing North Carolina. If the record oi: 
these one hundred years were examined, it would be found that 
many of our strong and generous churches in the leading towns 
and centers of the state, were organized and planted through the 
sacrificial labors of faithful state missionaries. 

Sometimes we hear the idea advanced that soon we will have 
finished the job of State Missions and that all the needy and 
promising fields will be occupied. But with the ever changing 
conditions and the rapid growth of the state in industrialism, in 
good roads, in public education, in the rapid shift of the popula- 
tion from the country to the town and city, there comes with 
every new generation new opportunities and new responsibilities 
for evangelizing and saving our own people. 

In the percentage division of our co-operative funds, State 
Missions received twenty cents out of the dollar. In addition to 
this, all funds given through the Sunday Schools on State Mission 
day, the last Sunday in October, goes to State Missions as an ex- 
tra amount. 

This year there are eighty-four missionaries in the employ of 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 9 



the board, serving about one hundred and fifty churches. The 
board is caring for the Sunday School, W. M. U., B. Y. P. U. and 
Student Work. This year we took the Indian work among the 
Indians in Robeson county and the Cherokee work in Swain 
county. 

The task is greater and the need is more imperative today than 
when our fathers began the work one hundred years ago. We 
hope every pastor will preach on State Missions during October, 
which is State Mission month throughout the south, and that 
every Sunday School will put on the State Mission program the 
last Sunday in October. Our board is heavily handicapped with 
a debt, and every church and Sunday School is urged to have a 
worthy part in this great statewide effort to lift the burden from 
our State Mission work. 

FRED R. POPLIN. 
REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

Home Missions might be defined as that group of missionary 
and evangelistic tasks which, either because of their nature or 
their size and difficulty, can best be done by a southwide agency. 

The Home Mission Board is the southwide agency through 
which Southern Baptists are doing their Home Mission work. The 
field of operation tor this board is the territory of the Southern 
Baptist Convention, the four Western Provinces of Cuba and the 
Canal Zone. 

The work is divided into the following departments: Direct and 
Independent Missions, including work among the foreigners, In- 
dians, negroes and city mission work, with Dr. J. W. Beagle as 
superintendent; mountain missions and schools including evan- 
gelism, industrial centers and mountain schools, with Dr. J. W. 
O'Hara as superintendent; mission work in Cuba with Dr. M. N. 
McCall as superintendent; mission work in Panama, Canal Zone, 
with Stephen Witt as superintendent; missions to the Jews, with 
Rev. Jacob Gartenhaus as missionary; mission study with Mrs. 
Una Roberts Lawrence as director; W. M. U. field work with Miss 
Emma Leachman as field worker; church building loan depart- 
ment with the executive secretary as superintendent, and Rev. 
Geo. F. Austin as field representative. 

The work for the ensuing year was laid out as instructed by 
the convention on the basis of the cash receipts of the previous 
year. These receipts were $407,357.58 on the Co-operative Pro- 
gram and $32,397.18 supplemental receipts, making a total of 
$439,754.76. 

The board set aside $250,000 to be paid on interest and prin- 
cipal of the debt. This necessitated some reduction in mission 
work, but by combining forces and consolidating mission stations, 
the board is able to hold all of its fields intact, though with re- 
duced personnel. 

The budget as fixed for the year is as follows : 



Independent and Direct Missions $55,000.00 

Cuba 50,000.00 

Mountain Missions and Schools 8,000.00 

El Paso Sanatorium 5,000.00 

Mission Study and Publicity 5,000.00 

Jewish Work 4,000.00 

W. M. U. Field Worker 2,500.00 

Panama and Canal Zone 1,200.00 

Expenses Southwide W. M. U 1-5,000.00 



Expenses Baptist Brotherhood of the South 2,280.00 



10 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Southern Baptist Convention Expenses 2,000.00 

Administration Salaries, executive & office 12,000.00 

Rent 3,420.00 

Traveling Expense 1,500.00 

Employees' Bond and Audit 1,500.00 

Postage, Express, etc 1,200.00 

Taxes . 1,000.00 

Office Supplies 500.00 

Repairs on Property 500.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 200.00 

Printing 400.00 

Extra Help, office 300.00 

Incidentals 150.00 

For Bonded Indebtedness, Interest and 

Principal 92,200.00 

Notes Payable, Interest and Principal 157,800.00 

Attorney's Fee 600.00 

Insurance 10,107.75 

Expense Annual Board Meeting 1,000.00 



Total $434,357.75 

The board has set itself definitely to the task of paying its 



debts, with the determination that when once out of debt, it will 
absolutely stay out of debt. Since September, 1928, it has paid 
in interest and principal on its indebtedness $713,987.57. The 
reduction of the debt, however, is being made with the least pos- 
sible inroads upon the mission work. The minimum amount that 
can be paid on interest and principal of the debt has been set 
aside as a fixed item in the budget of appropriations. Therefore 
any increase in contributions will mean an increase in mission 
work. 

Last year we had 168 workers and they baptized 2,219 people. 
This was 13 baptisms per worker. When we remember that a 
great deal of this work is with very difficult groups like foreign- 
ers here in our midst, in Cuba and Panama, who have a back- 
ground of Catholic teaching, this compares favorably with any 
mission work that our Baptist people are doing. 

Our people need to recognize the tremendous importance just 
now of our Home Mission work. This new day of industrialism 
is giving to us a new set of mission problems. Cities are growing 
very rapidly. Industrial communities are springing up almost 
over night. The tide of emigration is turning toward the south. 
All of these things create a real need for Home Missions. Our 
task is to mobilize our home forces for world-conquest for 
Christ, and our Home Mission work has a big place in this mobi- 
lization process. 

H. T. PENRY. 

14. G. W. Miller reads the report on the Mills Home. On mo- 
tion to adopt, the report is discussed by G. W. Miller and Rev. 
John A. McMillan and is adopted. 

REPORT ON THE ORPHANAGE 

The Apostle James voiced our conception of Orphanage work 
when he said: "Pure religion and undefiled before God and the 
Father is this: to visit the fatherless and widows in their afflic- 
tion, and to keep himself unspotted from the world." (James 
1:27.) To visit here means more than a social call. It means, in 
a broader sense, to visit in order that we might relieve their 
needs, administer to their necessities, provide for their welfare, 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



1 1 



educate, train, and develop their children in order that they 
might be prepared to meet life's problems, and fight life's battles 
as Christian soldiers, and by this ministry to instil in them a 
burning zeal to carry on their part in the extension of God's 
kingdom at home and abroad. Truly this is pure and undefiled 
religion. 

Such a conception of religion, we believe, was in the mind and 
heart of J. H. Mills, the founder of the Mills Home. And truly 
this is the conception of religion in the mind and heart of the 
present general manager, and because of this fact the work at 
the Mills Home has developed under his leadership. One very 
forward step in the work was the development of Mothers' Aid. 
Its chief aim is to save family values. A thorough diagnosis of 
each case is made, and often times adjustments are made whereby 
the children are cared for by relatives. Frequently one or both 
of the parents are sent to the hospital for treatment thereby 
saving the bread winners of the family, the proper guardians of 
the children, much public expense, and much untimely sorrow. 
Often when this is done wisely, sympathetically, and tactfully, 
there is a complete rehabilitation of the family. Only in extreme 
cases should the home be broken up, and even then it is better 
if the children could not come to the Orphanage if parental ad- 
justment can be made. What a tremendous service Mothers' Aid 
renders. Not only does it reduce the cost of maintenance per 
child from $23.53 per month to $6.18 per month, but think of the 
happiness of 269 children as they are cared for by 63 mothers 
through Mothers' Aid. 

Statistically, these are some of the features of the year's work. 
At present 639 children are being cared for through the Mills 
Home. The average cost is $23.53 per month or $282.31 per 
year. Of this number 135 are cared for at the Kennedy Home. 
There are 269 children cared for with 63 mothers through 
Mothers' Aid, and at a cost of $6.18 per month or $74 per year. 

In some ways this seems like a tremendous service that the 
Mills Home is rendering. But when we look at the other side we 
see that it is barely able to hold its own against the increasing 
tide of appeals for help. There are from fifty to a hundred ap- 
plications for help refused every month. In his last annual report 
the general manager says, "The number of appeals during the 
year perhaps, has not been greater, but the cry of anguish and 
the hopeless despair by daily mail and visits from almost frantic 
mothers has made this year a trial to those in charge." He fur- 
ther says in the report to the Baptist State Convention that "The 
very fact that any chlid appeals to us for aid, brings us, as an 
agency, under obligations to do something about it. If the child 
cannot and should not be received, we have not met our moral 
obligation without making some attempt to bring the child in 
touch with relief at once, or by setting influences in motion that 
will finally bring the proper help. Hence the plea that we lift 
our eyes for a larger view and supply a stronger and broader 
service in the field of child and family welfare." 

Oh, that Baptists of the Liberty Association would lift their 
eyes and behold the view of the suffering needs of the fatherless 
and widows in their affliction. If the Baptists of the state would 
lift their eyes to the needs of their unfortunate, then fifty and 
a hundred monthly frantic appeals for help would not receive a 
deaf ear. Let us resolve to do our best. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. W. MILLER. 



12 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15. The Committee on Time, Place and Preacher makes report, 
which is adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 

For 1931 Session 
Place: Lick Creek, High Rock, N. C. 

Time: Tuesday and Wednesday after first Sunday in Septem- 
ber, 1931. 

Preacher: Rev. M. O. Alexander, Thomasville, N. C 
Alternate: Rev. I. D. Ferguson, Mt. Airy, N. C. 

L. E. TEAGUE, 
G. W. WALL, 
JAMES M. HAYES, 
Committee on Time, Place and Preacher. 

16. The association adjourns at 4:30 P. M. to reconvene at 
7 :30 P. M., being dismissed by Rev. J. M. Hayes, of Lexington. 

TUESDAY EVENING SESSION 

17. The association convened at 7:30 P. M. 

The devotional is conducted by Rev. M. 0. Alexander, of 
Thomasville, N. C. He used Matthew 11:5 as a basis for his 
remarks. Prayer by R. D. Covington, treasurer Mills Home, 
Thomasville, N. C. 

18. W. L. Bowman, who was to have made the Report on 
Christian Education, being absent, it was suggested that we pro- 
ceed with the discussion of the report and adopt same tomorrow. 

At this time Rev. John A. McMillan introduces to the body 
Coy Muckle, president of Wingate College, who makes a bril- 
liant address on Christian Education. 

At the close of President Muckle's address, Dr. M. L. Kesler, 
superintendent of Mills Home, introduces to the association 
President Kitchin of Wake Forest College. Dr. Kitchin delighted 
the audience with his address on Christian Education. 

19. the association adjourns at 9:10 P. M. to reconvene to- 
morrow at 9:30 A. M., being dismissed by Rev. J. M. Hayes. 

SECOND DAY 

WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION 

20. The association convenes at 9:30 A. M., and the devotional 
is led by Rev. E. C. Roach, pastor of Welcome church. Prayer 
by Rev. Ronald Wall, of Lexington, N. C. 

21. Rev. E. F. Mumford reads the report on Baptist Hospitals. 
On motion to adopt, the report is discussed in a very convincing 
manner by Dr. Lumpkin, superintendent of the Baptist State 
Hospital at Winston-Salem, N. C, and is adopted. 

REPORT ON HOSPITAL 

With gratitude to our Lord the great Physician, we bring to 
you the seventh annual report of the work of the North Carolina 
Baptist Hospital. In every respect this has been our best year. 

The report for the year 1929 shows 2,725 patients, 591 of 
whom were full charity and 1009 part pay. Hundreds of these 
would have died had the Baptist Hospital failed to provide hos- 
pital care for them. Only eternity can tell the number of lives 
saved, homes preserved from the ravages of death and dissolution 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



and children from the tragedy of an orphan's life. 

We have had many of our ministers or members of their 
families, missionaries, students from our schools and scores of 
children, who came to us bound by deformities and crippled with 
disease. All of these except a very small percentage we have 
sent back happy and well. 

We are needing equipment. The growth of the institution, the 
march of medical science, the ravages of age, all challenge us to 
put the new and needed equipmnt in to keep step with progress. 
We must do it or lose our reputation. But the question is how 
can we meet the overwhelming demands of charity that take 
every dollar we can raise and keep the hospital up-to-date. 

Last year we spent $45,500 for charity. To help us meet this 
tremendous demand, we received from the denomination on 
Mother's Day $15,500 and from the Duke Foundation, $8,750. 
A few small donations supplemented these offerings, but over 
$19,000 of this had to be taken out of our operating account. We 
paid our bills, but we suffered for the need of equipment, repairs 
and help to do our work effectively. 

This year, up to June 1, 46 per cent of our patient days were 
absolute charity. That is only 54 per cent of the patient days 
brought us any revenue at all. The others were charity. The 
amount necessary to care for this increasing demand for this 
year will be at least $60,000. And yet we cannot let our sick 
and needy Baptists die. 

What is the solution to this problem? Simply this: Our 
churches and Sunday Schools must take the hospital seriously. 
Only one fifth of the schools give to this cause and many of 
these do not give all the offering on Mother's Day. They take 
a special collection after the Sunday School expenses are taken 
and the hospital gets the remnants. 

We must have a larger support for our own hospital. Our 
people must learn to patronize it when they are able to pay for 
the service. We have the best hospital in this section of the 
state. Why not bring your friends to us and let us care for 
them? 

We must put the hospital on the hearts of the people and urge 
them to support it in a worthy way. We must talk about it; pray 
about it; preach about it. 

And lastly, we can lead our people to remember the hospital 
in their wills. Fifteen thousand dollars left as an endowment 
will care for a bed in the hospital for all time and that will care 
for at least 24 persons a year until Jesus comes again. What a 
glorious investment in human life and health! 

Let's put our hospital deep down in our hearts, brethren. Let's 
make our offerings reach $25,000 next year. Then the hospital 
will care for at least 2,000 of those needy ones who come without 
money or price. And surely our Lord will not forget, for He 
said, "Inasmuch as ye have done it to one of these, the least of 
my brethren, ye have done it unto me." 

E. F. MUMFORD. 

22. Rev. J. M. Hayes reads- the report on Foreign Missions. 
On motion to adopt, it is discussed in an able manner by Rev. 
J. M. Hayes and Rev. R. L. West and is adopted. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

In the eighty-fifth annual report to the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, Dr. T. B. Ray, secretary of the Foreign Mission Board, 



14 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



gave the following interesting facts about the work of our de- 
nomination in foreign fields: 

Finances 

Debt has been reduced since January 1, 1928, to May 1, 1930, 
from $1,145,000 to $615,137.32. The plan of reducing the debt 
is to apply to it ten per cent of all receipts from the Co-operative 
Program, all special gifts made for this purpose, and all moneys 
received from the sale of properties owned by the board which 
are not now being used for mission purposes. Out of the $190,- 
130.81 gift made by the Woman's Missionary Union of the south 
in their Lottie Moon Christmas offering, $86,130.81 was applied 
to the reduction of the debt. 

Receipts for the year ending May 1, 1930, amounted to 
$1,222,287.30. This was $206,369.61 less than the amount re- 
ceived last year. The Foreign Mission Board received from the 
Co-operative Program last year $802,065, and from designated 
gifts $568,867. 

Secretary Ray says that Southern Baptists are not giving 
enough to maintain our present work on foreign fields, to say 
nothing of reducing our debt. He further states that unless the 
receipts of the board can be increased, we must incur either a 
larger debt, or we must abandon some of our fields. 

Loss of workers during the last three years number 100 foreign 
missionaries. Further losses would be calamitous. Dr. Ray says 
that we cannot cut down our work much more without ruining it. 

God Blessing Work in Every Field. 

With a corps of 445 foreign missionaries and 2200 native 
workers, the work of evangelizing seems to be meeting unparal- 
leled success. Last year there were 13,250 baptisms, exceeding 
by more than 1000 the number of any year in the history of our 
work on foreign fields. More baptisms were reported by our 
workers in Rumania last year than has ever been known in the 
history of our missionary effort on any field. There were 4,925 
baptisms on this field, where persecution of the missionaries was 
about to match that endured by Paul and his helpers. Wherever 
the sweet story of Jesus and His redeeming love has been told 
by our faithful workers, the Holy Spirit blessed it and brought 
results. It takes fewer Christians on foreign fields to win an 
unsaved person than it does, to our shame, in the home land. It 
took Robert Morrison seven years to win his frist convert. But 
think how the seed he sowed is bearing an abundant harvest now. 

The report of our missionary effort gives added proof that God 
is blessing our work in every land as shown by the marked growth 
in the various organizations. There are now 1,407 churches with 
a total membership of 161,059. They raised $472,820.12 for the 
work of Christ's Kingdom, raising this amount last year. There 
are now 1,965 Sunday schools with a membership of 72,983; 1,129 
Women's Missionary Societies with a total membership of 16,773; 
and 987 Young People's Societies with a membership of 20,660. 

Former Secretary Love, in his book, God's Challenge to Amer- 
ica, says: "The fact which today should grip the conscience of 
every American Christian is, that God is making an extraordinary 
call to foreign mission service, and that we may by heeding His 
call break all foreign mission records of achievement. There is 
no precedent to present circumstance in all the history of Chris- 
tianity . . . The clock of time has now struck the supreme hour. 
Delay is no longer tolerable. God is now sounding forth His 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



trumpet. Disobedience and hesitation now declare our disloy- 
alty." 

Shall Southern Baptists heed the clarion call to duty as it rings 
in our ears from God's Word? Shall you and I, my brethren, 
heed the call? How can we close our pocketbooks and turn a 
deaf ear to such calls to duty as the following challenging words 
from God's message to you and me? 

"Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheri- 
tance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possessions." 
— Psalm 2:8. 

"And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the 
world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end 
come." — Matt. 24:4. 

"And he said unto them, Go ye into all the world, and preach 
the gospel to every creature." — Mark 16:15. 

"How then shall they call on him in whom they have not be- 
lieved? and how shall they believe in him of whom they have not 
heard? and how shall they hear without a preacher?" 

"And how shall they preach, except they be sent." — Rom. 10:12 

How can they be sent, unless you and I, and our Baptist breth- 
ren give of our money to send them? 

Quoting again from Secretary Ray's report to the Southern 
Baptist Convention, I close. "God has called our missionaries 
to go to foreign fields. Shall Southern Baptists call them back? 
If Christ is the only hope, as the Scriptures plainly teach, what 
will be our responsibility if we fail to do less than our best to 
give the message of His redeeming love to all the nations of the 
earth?" 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES M. HAYES. 

23. C. M. Wall at this time reads the report on Ministerial 
Relief. On motion to adopt, it is well discussed by C. M. Wall 
and is adopted. 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF AND ANNUITIES 

The care of our aged and disabled preachers and the widows 
and orphans of deceased preachers deserves the most earnest and 
prayerful attention at the hands of all our people. The Relief 
and Annuity Board of the Southern Baptist Convention with 
headquarters in Dallas, Texas, with Dr. Thomas J. Watts as ex- 
ecutive secretary, is faithfully and sympathetically administering 
and distributing the funds placed in its hands by the churches. 
That far too little money has been contributed by our people for 
this nobly beneficent work all must freely confess. That more 
money should be given for the support of our veterans, widows 
and orphans will not be questioned. Surely our old ministers are 
deserving of better treatment in their declining years. What 
Southern Baptists are doing through their board for these faith- 
ful servants of the cross is helpful but it is painfully insufficient. 
Surely, every church should strive to see to it that the old 
preacher is better provided for. Let some good man or woman 
in each church write to the board for literature and inform the 
people concerning this great need. Do not wait — do it now! 

Important Changes in the Methods of the Relief and 
Annuity Board 

The Southern Bapitst Convention at New Orleans provided for 
the placing of all gifts through the Co-operative Program into 



16 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



the relief fund. After the 31st of December, 1930, the board's 
annuity department will receive no more money from the benev- 
olent contributions of the churches. The relief beneficiaries will 
get the full benefit of these gifts. They will, of course, continue 
to receive also benefits of earnings on the board's relief endow- 
ment and all contributions designated for relief. Not only so, 
the board will strive to secure special gifts looking to the enlarge- 
ment of the relief fund. If our churches will give the money 
that they should through the regular Co-operative Program the 
relief beneficiaries of the board will receive very much larger 
benefits and a greater number of beneficiaries will be added to 
the roll. It should be clear to our people that the relief board 
cannot pay out money any faster than it comes in, but if the 
money is given the donors may know that the relief beneficiaries 
will get every dollar of it. 

The Service Annuity Plan 

Provision is now offered through the service annuity depart- 
ment whereby chuches can individually assist their preachers in 
building up for themselves and their dependents an age or disa- 
bility monthly income and do this building while they are in ac- 
tive service. Thus our ministers will be provided for against the 
time of need and in the most economical way. Interest earnings 
will produce the greater part of the benefits. This is a method 
of prevention rather than of cure. The churches are urged to 
get directly from the Relief and Annuity Board or from an au- 
thorized representative the facts about this plan. This is a mat- 
ter that cannot be acted upon intelligently without full informa- 
tion. Many of our preachers and churches are ready to go into 
this plan and ere long their number will be legion. The more 
our churches do to prevent dependence in old age or disability on 
the part of their ministers the better. The relief board will not 
do less for preachers who come to old age unprovided for. In 
fact it will do far more than it has ever done for them. At the 
same time it will, by the operation of the Service annuity, bring 
about a condition in which fewer preachers will come to old age 
without a support and this support will be more adequate. All 
serious minded Baptists will, upon taking due thought, approve 
of the plan. The Southern Baptist Convention, after careful 
consideration adopted the recommendations of the committee of 
thirty-eight, consisting of two messengers from each state, ap- 
proved the Service Annuity and did this by a great majority. 
Therefore, the convention has commended the plan for the use 
of churches and preachers. 

C. M. WALL, for Committee. 

24. Motion is made that report of the Committee on Digest of 
Church Letters be made in connection with the report on State 
of Churches. 

The motion is carried and the Report on State of Churches is 
read by Rev. M. O. Alexander, who also reports for the Com- 
mittee on Digest of Church Letters. 

After motion to adopt, the reports are discussed by Rev. M. O. 
Alexander, Rev. R. L. West and others. 

During these discussions some complaints were made by the 
delegates from the Wallburg church in regard to a statement 
made last year in the Report on State of the Churches, concern- 
ing their church. 

After several delegates and members of the body had made 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



remarks concerning same, Rev. J. M. Hayes makes a motion that 
the matter be referred to a committee composed of the follow- 
ing: Rev. M. L. Kesler, Rev. M. 0. Alexander, Rev. J. A. McMil- 
lan, C. M. Wall and C. R. Dodson. The motion is carried. 

Special prayer for Divine guidance of the committee is offered 
by Rev. M. 0. Alexander. 

Further discussion on State of the Churches is made by Rev. 
H. T. Penry and the reports are adopted. 

REPORT ON STATE OF CHURCHES 

The Liberty Association is composed of twenty-six churches. 
The Oak Hill church ceases to exist. The Sheets Memorial church 
comes in. This is a new organization in South Lexington. 

We must get back to the time-honored Baptist idea and theory 
that the church, the local congregation of believers, is the su- 
preme unit and sovereign authority in all the co-operative work 
and life of the denomination. We must learn that even a greater 
thing among Baptists than independence, is the idea and fact, 
of voluntary and whole-hearted co-operation in all phases of 
kingdom work. The local association must so arrange and mobil- 
ize its forces, that every church within its bounds shall be actively 
and constructively enlisted in the program of the denomination, 
as expressed in its organizations and agencies. 

Out of six or seven possible fields of churches in our associa- 
tion there is not one intact at this time. The lack of co-operation 
on the part of churches in forming fields is distressing and disas- 
trous to our whole work. The ministers themselves often inter- 
fere in this matter of field combination. We have entirely too 
many non-resident pastors, nine of the eighteen, exactly half, 
now serving our churches live elsewhere and some of them great 
distances away. These non-resident pastors, many of them, have 
never met in our associational pastors monthly conference, not 
one of them attends with any regularity, nor do they know our 
associational program or evidence any interest in our general 
cause. Five of our pastors have never been seen in one of our 
conferences, nor are they known to our active organization. No 
pastor in any association is true to his church, who ignores his 
brother pastors and the co-operative work in his association. 

The missionary zeal of our churches is at a very low flame, if 
indeed it flames at all. Evidence of our concern about this 
serious situation is not forthcoming. 

All of our churches have felt the effect of financial depression, 
as the general reports will show. 

Many of our churches are inactive so far as our co-operative 
work is concerned. 

Our suggestion is, that the association now assembled enter 
into a full, frank and brotherly discussion of this whole matter, 
looking to a closer co-operative work and to the accomplishment 
of greater things for His Kingdom. 

Cordially, 
M. 0. ALEXANDER. 

25. Rev. E. F. Mumford reads the report on Memorials. 
The association stands in honor of those who have died during 
the last year and is led in prayer by Rev. L. A. Connell. 
The report is adopted. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



In Remembrance of Those Who Have Answered 
the Roll Call Since Our Last Association 

"In My Father's house are many mansions." 
ABBOTTS CREEK NEW FRIENDSHIP 



Mrs. Bettie Pitts 

Mr. R. H. Wear 

Mrs. Minnie Beanblossom 

Miss Ellen Teague 

CENTER HILL 

Mr. C. A. Owens 
Mr. J. L. Bowers 

CHURCHLAND 

Deacon L. M. Barnes 
Mrs. Amanda Lamb 

DENTON 

Mr. John T. Nooe 
Mr. Robert Russell 

HOLLOWAYS 

Mr. Joseph Briggs 
Miss Maggie Swing 

JERSEY 

Mr. J. D. Feezor 
Mr. J. L. Palmer 
Mrs. Mary A. Cross 
Miss Mary Rowe 

LEXINGTON 

Mrs. W. T. Brown 
Mrs. F. C. Sowers 
Mr. John W. Morgan 
Mrs. Charlie Prevost 
Mrs. Mary Jane Davis 

LIBERTY 

Mr. H. D. Easter 

LICK CREEK 

Deacon P. M. Snider 
Mrs. Bessie Cole 
Mrs. Julia Elbertson 



Mr. A. J. Hartman 
Mrs. Mary E. Veach 

REEDS 

Mr. Charlie A. Snider 
Mrs. Mary Simmerson 

RICH FORK 

Mrs. Julia Swing 
Mrs. Sam L. Everhart 

STONERS GROVE 

Deacon S. E. Wafford 
J. D. Lookabill 

SOUTHSIDE 

Mrs. Nancy Russell 

SUMMERVILLE 

Mrs. Fannie Hill 
Mrs. Mattie Carrick 
Mrs. Julia Ann Davis 
Mrs. Jane Doby 
Mr. James Carrick 
Mr. Burrell Snider 

TABERNACLE 

Mr. Robert L. Thacker 

THOMAS VILLE 

Mrs. Martha Grimes 
Mrs. Ellen Westmoreland 
Mrs. W. G. Fitzgerald 
Mr. Will Fitzgerald 
Mrs. D. A. Jenkins 
Mrs. Minnie Shaver 

WALLBURG 

Mr. C. R. Rothrock 
Mr. Joseph Mendenhall 



E. F. MUMFORD, Chairman Committee. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



26. The association adjourns at 12:30 P. M., to reconvene 
at 1:30 P. M. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

27. The association convenes at 1:30 P. M., Rev. M. 0. Alex- 
ander leads the devotional. 

28. Mrs. R. S. Green reads the report on W. M. U. After 
motion to adopt the report is discussed by Mrs. R. S. Green and 
G. W. Miller and is adopted. 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK 

The 24th annual session of the Woman's Missionary Union of 
the Liberty Association was held with riolioway's Church on 
August 21, 1930. 

A large attendance gave cause for great encouragement, and 
the fact that a goodly number of the brethren and some pastors 
were present was a gratifying indication of an increasing interest 
in the great work of giving the gospel to all the world. There 
were reports either by delegates or letter from practically every 
organization in the union and each one showed some progress, 
some desire to go f orward and to accomplish greater things, none 
seemed to have been satisiied that the goal of attainment had 
been reached. 

The presence of Miss Pearle Johnson, of Apex, N. C, one of 
our missionaries to China, who is now at home on furlough, was 
a cause for added interest, and her inspiring message as she told 
of work accomplished, and put before us something of the needs 
in that great country where there are millions still untouched by 
the gospel of our Lord will surely result in an awakened zeal in 
the cause of missions. 

During the past year one new Woman's Missionary Society has 
been organized and one has disbanded, leaving the number the 
same as last year. At present there are 26 churches reported in 
our association with missionary societies in only 16, which puts 
before us a problem right at home. A number of new organiza- 
tions have been effected among our young people and this is an 
evidence that the mother societies, the W. M. S., have been ac 
work. Our program topic in our W. M. U. for September is "In 
union there is strength," and only by interesting and enlisting 
the young people of our churches can we hope to have a strong- 
union and expectation for the future in mission work. The 
greatest need is that we begin teaching missions to our sons 
and daughters while they are young and pliable, during the 
Sunbeam age, and never let up but continue through the Girls 
Auxiliary, Royal Ambassadors and on into the Young Woman's 
Auxiliary. By this time a belief in the great missionary program 
should be thoroughly instilled into their minds and hearts, and 
the study of the Bible and missions, the information gained by 
reading the missionary periodicals and Biblical Recorder, the 
training in systematic giving, stewardship and tithing, the train- 
ing in the prayer life and in becoming fruit bearing Christians 
should bring to pass a realization of the picture given us in 
Psalm 144:12: "That our sons may be as plants grown up in 
their youth; that our daughters may be as cornerstones polished 
after the similitude of a palace." 

Oh, that our people might get a vision of the task so far from 
completion, that they might see our Master as He looks in sorrow 
as we fail Him in carrying out His last request to His people! 
May we realize our opportunities and may we work while yet it 



20 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



is day that the time may soon come when the knowledge of God 
shall cover the earth as the waters cover the sea. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. R. S. GREEN. 

29. The report on B. Y. P. U. in the absence of Miss Elizabeth 
Smith is read by Rev. H. T. Penry. On motion to adopt, the 
report is discussed by Rev. H. T. Penry, Rev. J. M. Hayes and 

Sam J. Smith and is adopted. 

REPORT ON B. Y. P. U. 

If we could bring the great good which the B. Y. P. XL's of tha 
Liberty Association are doing to all the people of every church 
in one large picture there would be a greater desire among our 
people to see that more B. Y. P. U.'s were organized and func- 
tioning in each church possible. The need of helping enlist and 
encourage all the young people to give of their time and talents 
is the present cry. The B. Y. P. U. is the place in which every 
young church member can improve his talents and thereby be a 
more efficient church member. All of the active B. Y. P. U. 
members are growing through daily Bible reading and prayer, 
through study, through giving, through decision, through Chris- 
tian fellowship, through expansion, through soul winning, through 
enlargement and increased efficiency, through denominational 
loyalty, and through worldwide service. Our great objective for 
the year is that each shall grow in grace and knowledge of our 
Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. The larger number we have in 
B. Y. P. U. the more enlightened, the more efficient, better 
equipped and developed churches we shall have in this association. 

There have been only a few new B. Y. P. U.'s organized and 
reported during the past year, nevertheless there has been some 
good work done by the active ones. 

It behooves all the pastors, leaders of the present B. Y. P. U.'s, 
deacons, superintendents, teachers, and Christian people to help 
support and share the responsibility in carrying on this work, to 
appeal to the young people to help enlist all the young people of 
our churches that they may improve their talents and be of more 
service 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH SMITH. 

30. The report on Sunday Schools is read by Rev. E. C. Roach. 
On motion to adopt, the report is discussed by Rev. E. C. Roach 
and is adopted. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

During the past year we have made great progress in our Sun- 
day schools. But we have not reached our goal yet. How can 
Baptists stop, when there are more than 950,000 people that are 
not darkening our church doors, for either Sunday school or 
preaching. 

May we as Baptists hear, as one of old, "Go and work today in 
my vineyard." 

The possibility of Baptists is at our door, what will we do witn 
the task? 

The Sunday school is the greatest teaching agency for the pro- 
motion of Bible study, because there is a place in the Sunday 
school for every age. 

We are told that 85 per cent of our church members come 
through and by the Sunday school. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



This being true, we should have the very best, trained Chris- 
tians, men and women, boys and girls, possible, to lead in our 
Rchools. 

No Sunday school is likely to go beyond the ability of its 
leaders, and no class will rise higher than its teachers, and there- 
fore we need, and must have the very best leaders possible, to 
carry on the work of the school. 

1. In the first place we must have men and women that know 
God. 

2. They must know the Bible. Each officer and teacher should 
keep in touch with the Sunday school work. Through the Sunday 
school board is a good way. 

One step toward better schools are, better equipment or ade- 
quate church buildings. 

Numbers of our churches in the Liberty Association are suffer- 
ing because of lack of adequate building for the classes. 

The day of Sunday school, or teaching in the one room building 
is past, it is past in our public schools, and it should be past in 
our Sunday schools. 

Proper organization is a very important step toward a growing 
Sunday school. Classes should be properly organized, using the 
proper literature, securing the best teachers possible to make the 
class and school grow. 

To enlarge and enrich the Sunday school we would suggest the 
enlargement campaign. 

Numbers of associations have put on the enlargement cam- 
paign, and report great results from the work. 

At last we would notice the aim of the enlargement campaign 

1. Discuss the Sunday school possibilities. 

2. Enlarge the working forces. 

3. Get out after the people in a more definite, personal and 
scriptural way. 

4. Get better teaching done. 

5. Win the lost to Christ. 

6. Train the enlisted into greater service for Christ. 

The cry is still heard, "Say not ye, there are yet four months 
and then cometh the harvest? Behold I say unto you, lift up 
your eyes and look on the field for they are white already unto 
harvest." 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. ROACH. 

31. The committee heretofore appointed in re last year's re- 
port on State of the Churches, as same concerned the Wallburg 
church, reports as follows: 

REPORT ON WALLBURG CHURCH 

We your committee, with reference to Wallburg church and 
reference thereto in Report on State of Churches made in 1929, 
beg to report that we find the Wallburg church contributing to 
all our causes through regular and specified channels. 

The church is united and growing in all of its departments. 

Respectfully, 

C. M. WALL, 

J. a. McMillan, 

C. R. REDWINE, 
M. O. ALEXANDER. 
The report is adopted by the association. 

32. Upon motion the association votes that the proceedings of 
the W. M. U. Associational meeting recently held with the church 



22 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



at Holloways be printed in the minutes of this body. 

33. Rev. E. F. Mumford reads the report of the Committee on 
Nominations, which is adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS 

Associational Director — M 0. Alexander, Thomasville. 

Orphanage Representative — R. D. Covington, Thomasville. 

To prepare reports for next session: 

On State of Churches — M. 0. Alexander, Thomasville. 

Home Missions — J. A. McMillan, Thomasville. 

Religious Literature, Recorder — B. K. Mason, Winston-Salem. 

Baptist Hospitals — Ronald Wall, Lexington. 

State Missions — E. F. Mumford, Wallburg. 

B. Y. P. U. — Miss Elizabeth Smith, Linwood. 

Christian Education — J. M. Hayes, Lexington. 

Foreign Missions — H. T. Penry, Southmont. 

Ministerial Relief — G. A. Martin, Denton. 

Woman's Work — Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville. 

Sunday Schools — A. J. Newton, Lexington. 

Orphanage — Walter L. Warfford, Southmont. 

Program committee for 1931: Chairman, J. A. McMillan, 
Thomasville; G. W. Miller, Lexington; S. B. Wilson, High Point. 

Executive committee: J. M. Hayes, Lexington; C. C. Wrenn, 
Southmont; L. E. Teague, Thomasville; D. S. Hayworth, High 
Point, Route 4; A. L. Snyder, Denton; W. H. Loman, Linwood. 

Representative on State Mission Board — M. L. Kesler, Thom- 
asville. 

Delegate to Southern Baptist Convention — H. T. Penry, 
Southmont. 

Delegate to State Baptist Convention — G. A. Martin, Denton. 

Committee on Digest Church Letters in 1931 — J. A. McMillan, 
Thomasville; Walter Warfford, Southmont; Sam J. Smith, Lex- 
ington. 

M. L. KESLER, 
E. F. MUMFORD, 
Committee on Nominations. 

34. Sam J. Smith, clerk and treasurer of the association, reads 
his report as treasurer, which is adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

I submit herewith my report as treasurer of the Association 
for the year ending September 8, 1930. 

RECEIPTS 



Abbotts Creek $6.00 

Center Hill 4.00 

Churchland 6.00 

Denton 6.00 

Erlanger 4.00 

Gravel Hill 2.00 

Holloways 2.25 

Jersey 4.00 

Lexington 25.00 

Liberty 4.00 

Lick Creek 3.50 

New Friendship 5.00 

Oak Hill 2.00 

Total 



Balance on hand from last year. 
Total Receipts 



Orphanage 12.00 

Reeds 5.00 

Rich Fork 2.50 

Smith Grove 4.00 

Southside 3.00 

Westfield 3.00 

Stoners Grove . 6.00 

Summerville 3.20 

Taylors Grove 1.00 

Thomasville 15.00 

Wallburg 5.00 

Walters Grove 0.00 

Welcome 5.00 



.$138.45 
1.35 
$139.80 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Paid express on Minutes $ .96 

Charity and Children for Programs 3.50 

Charity and Children for printing minutes 100.00 

Postage 5.30 

Sam J. Smith, Clerk 30.00 

Balance on hand .04 



Total $139.80 

Respectfully submitted, 

SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer. 

35. C. H. Teague reads the report of the Finance Committee, 
which is adopted. 

REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 

We recommend that each church raise the amount set opposite 
its name to be applied on the Co-operative Program next year. 

Abbotts Creek $500.00 Rich Fork 250.00 

Center Hill 100.00 Smith Grove 100.00 

Churchland 500.00 Sheets Memorial 5.00 

Denton 300.00 Southside 50.00 

Gravel Hill 15.00 Stoners Grove 75.00 

Holloways 100.00 Summerville 50.00 

Jersey 200.00 Tabernacle 200.00 

Lexington 3000.00 Taylors Grove 10.00 

Liberty 100.00 Thomasville 1500.00 

Lick Creek 75.00 Wallburg 225.00 

New Friendship 330.00 Walters Grove 15.00 

Orphanage 1352.86 Welcome 60.00 

Reeds 60.00 Westfield 25.00 

Total $9197.86 

For Minute fund, printing, etc., we recommend that each 
church pay not less than 3 cents per member. 

This should by all means be sent to the association with the 
church letter. 

We commend the churches for their promptness and liberality 
in contributing to the minute fund last year. With one exception 
every church in the association contributed. 

G. W. MILLER, 
C. H. TEAGUE, 
G. W. WALL, 

Finance Committee. 

36. The moderator at this time appoints the following com- 
mittee on Digest of Church Letters for 1931: Rev. J. A. Mc- 
Millan, Rev. Walter Wafford and Sam J. Smith. 

37. Rev. H. T. Penry presents the following resolution, which 
is adopted: 

RESOLUTION OF THANKS 

Resolved: That we hereby extend to the pastor and members 
of Abbotts Creek church and the people of this community our 
sincere thanks and gratitude for their gracious entertainment 
and hospitality during the sessions of this association. 

And that we also thank them for the use of their magnificent 
church and equipment for the present session. 



24 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



38. Sam J. Smith presents the following resolution, which is 
adopted : 

RESOLUTION IN REGARD CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 

The Liberty Association will be one hundred years old on 
September 24, 1932. 

When it was organized at Mt. Tabor Meeting House in Ran- 
dolph County in 1832 its membership consisted of 159 members. 
Now we have a membership of over five and one half thousand. 

And besides many more thousands have labored for the Master 
and have gone to their eternal reward from its ranks. 

While our religion does not call for the worship of the dead 
and the past; but God forbid that we should be so ungrateful not 
to do honor and memory to the pioneers in our faith, and de- 
nomination. 

THEREFORE, Be it resolved, that it is the sense of this asso- 
ciation assembled that necessary arrangements should be made 
for the proper and suitable celebration of the 100th anniversary 
of the Liberty Association in 1932. 

And be it further resolved that: M. L. Kesler, Thomasville; 
S. M. Miller, Lexington; A. L. Snyder, Denton; D. S. Hayworth, 
High Point, and Sam J. Smith, Lexington, be appointed as a 
committee to submit plans to the next session of this body, for 
properly observing and celebrating our 100th anniversary in 
1932. 

39. Song, "Bless Be the Tie That Binds/' 

Prayer by Rev. Ira D. Ferguson. 

The association adjourns at 3:30 P. M. 

ARCHIBALD JOHNSON, Moderator. 
G. W. MILLER, Vice-Moderator. 
SAM J. SMITH, Clerk. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 

PASTORS OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Name Church Member of 

Alexander, M. O., Thomasville, N. C Thomasville 

Bradley, Earl, Spencer, N. C Smith Grove 

Ferguson, Ira D., Mt. Airy, N. C Wallburg 

Hanes, J. H., Winston-Salem, N. C Westfield 

Hayes, J. M., Lexington, N. C Lexington 

Johnson, C. R., Erlanger, N. C Tabernacle 

McMillan, John A., Thomasville, N. C. Thomasville 

Mason, B. K., Winston-Salem, N. C, Box 230 New Friendship 

Martin, G. A., Denton, N. C Denton 

Morris, D. P., Norwood, N. C Summerville 

Mumford, E. F., Wallburg, N. C. Abbotts Creek 

Penry, H. T., Southmont, N. C. Stoners Grove 

Roach, E. C. f Jamestown, N. C. Welcome 

Turner, E. W., Mocksville, N. C Reeds 

West, R. L., Thomasville, N. C Southside 

Wilson, S. B., High Point, N. C Lick Creek 

ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE 
ASSOCIATION WHO ARE NOT PASTORS, AND THE 
CHURCHES THEY BELONG TO 

Bishop, S., Lexington, N. C. (Retired) Tabernacle 

Caldwell, M. R. N., Albemarle, N. C. (Inactive) Taylors Grove 

Clarke, B. F., Thomasville, N. C. (Inactive) Thomasville 

Connell, L. A., Thomasville, N. C. (Evangelist) Thomasville 

Jarrett, John, Lexington, N. C, R. 6 (Teacher) Center Hill 

Kesler. M. L., Thomasville, N. C. (Supt. Mills Home). .Mills Home 

Liner, G. H., Erlanger, N. C. (Inactive).. Tabernacle 

Mullis, E. H., High Point, N. C. (Inactive) Southside 

Newton, J. D., Thomasville, N. C. (Inactive) Thomasville 

Poplin, Fred R., Thomasville, N. C. (Teacher) Mills Home 

Wafford, Walter L., Southmont, N. C. (Student) ..Stoners Grove 

Wall, Ronald, Lexington, N. C. (Student) Lexington 

Woodle, Avery, Cid, N. C. (Inactive) Walters Grove 

Gallimore^ Arthur, China (Missionary) .-. Lexington 

ASSISTANT PASTORS AND EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 



No church in the association has an assistant pastor or educa- 
tional director. 



B. Y. P. U. 

ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

President — Miss Elizabeth Smith, Linwood, N. C. 
Vice-President (Lexington Group) — Gilmer Cross, Lexing- 
ton, N. C. 

Vice-President (Thomasville Group) — Mrs. C. M. Howell, 
Thomasville, N. C. 

Vice-President (Denton Group) — Miss Hazel Russell, Denton, 
N. C. 

Junior-Intermediate Leader — Miss Mattie Lee Wrenn, South- 
mont, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Miss Sarah Bishop, Erlanger, N. C. 
Pianist— Miss Elizabeth Barnes, Linwood, N. C. 



26 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENTS, LEADERS AND DIRECTORS 

ABBOTTS CREEK: 

Lucian Gregory (S), High Point, N. C, R. 4 (Pres.) 
CHURCHLAND: 

Mary Neal Shoaf (S), Linwood, N. C, R. 1 (Pres.) 

Mrs. Hugh Davis (J), Lexington, N. C, R. 5 (Leader) 
DENTON: 

Bruce Gallimore (S), Denton, N. C. (Pres.) 
A. L. Snider (I), Denton, N. C. (Leader) 
Miss Thelma Russell (J), Denton, N. C. (Leader) 
JERSEY: 

Miss Elizabeth Smith (J), Linwood, N. C. (Leader) 

LEXINGTON: 

Adrian J. Newton, Lexington, N. C. (Director) 
John A. Sink (A), Lexington, N. C. (Pres.) 
T. L. Henderson (S), Lexington, N. C. (Pres.) 
Sam J. Smith (I), Lexington, N. C. (Leader) 
Miss Violet Cross (J), Lexington, N. C. (Leader) 
Miss Grace Williams (I), Lexington, N. C. (Pres.) 

MILLS HOME: 

J. A. McMillan, Thomasville, N. C. (Director) 
Alice Hodges (S), Thomasville, N. C. (Pres.) 
Idolene Lester (S), Thomasville, N. C. (Pres.) 
Pattie Fleetwood (S), Thomasville, N. C. (Pres.) 
Miss Ruth wings (I), Thomasville, N. C. (Leader) 
Miss Bertha Piland (I), Thomasville, N. C. (Leader) 
C. C. McKoin (I), Thomasville, N. C. (Leader) 
Miss Sue Wright (J), Thomasville, N. C. (Leader) 
Miss Ethel Johnson (J), Thomasville, N. C. (Leader) 
Miss Rebecca Allen (J), Thomasville, N. C. (Leader) 

RICH FORK: 

Clyde Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C, R. 1 (Director) 

SMITH GROVE: 

Miss Ruth Snider, Linwood, N. C, R. 2 (Director) 
Hugh Snider (I), Linwood, N. C, R. 2 (Pres.) 

SOUTHSIDE: 

Frank Ware, Thomasville, N. C. (Director) 

J. F. Epps (S), Thomasville, N. C. (Pres.) 

Miss Rennie West (I), Thomasvlile, N. C. (Leader) 

Miss Sadie Hoyle (J), Thomasville, N. C. (Leader) 

TABERNACLE: 

Grady Haynes, Erlanger, N. C. (Director) 

THOMASVILLE: 

Prevette Westmoreland, Thomasville, N. C. (Director) 
Chas. Howell (S), Thomasville, N. C. (Pres.) 
L. E. Teague (I), Thomasville, N. C. (Leader) 
Mrs. C. M. Howell (J), Thomasville, N. C. (Leader) 

WALLBURG: 

Walter McCuiston, Wallburg, N. C. (Director) 



W. M. U. 

ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Superintendent — Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 
Associate Supt. — Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 
Secretray and Treas. — Miss Esther Newton, Thomasville, N. C. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



Junior Supt. — Miss Mary Misenheimer, Lexington, N. C. 
Personal Service Chairman — Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Thomas- 
ville, N. C. 

Mission Study Chairman — Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, 
Route 4. 

OFFICERS WOMEN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 
Presidents and Addresses 
ABBOTTS CREEK: Mrs. Nina Hayworth, High Point, N. C. R. 4. 
CENTER HILL: Mrs. H. L. Miller, Linwood, N. C, R. 2. 
CHURCHLAND: Mrs. 0. T. Davis, Linwood, N. C, R. 1. 
DENTON: Mrs. C. E. Clyatt, Denton, N. C. 
HOLLO WAYS: Mrs. W. H. Johnson, High Rock, N. C, R. 1. 
JERSEY: Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Linwood, N. C. 
LEXINGTON: Mrs. L. A. Martin, Lexington, N. C. 
MILLS HOME: Miss Lottie Olney, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: Mrs. Wm. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C, 
Route 4. 

REEDS: Mrs. Alda Craver, Lexington, N. C, R. 3. 
RICH FORK: Mrs. W. M. Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C, R. 1. 
SMITH GROVE: Mrs. E. R. Lanning, Linwood, N. C, R. 2. 
STONERS GROVE: Mrs. L. E. Lookabill, Southmont, N. C. 
SOUTHSIDE: Mrs. R. L. West, Thomasville, N. C. 
TABERNACLE: Mrs. R. K. Smith, Erlanger, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE: Mrs. M. 0. Alexander, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG: Miss Etta Teague, Wallburg, N. C. 



OTHER AUXILIARY LEADERS 

Y. W. A. COUNSELLORS 

DENTON: Miss Hazel Russell, Denton, N. C. 

HOLLO WAYS: Miss Tela Beanblossom, High Rock, N. C. 

LEXINGTON: Mrs. J. M. Hayes, Lexington, N. C. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP: Mrs. Farris Swaim, 1904 Waughtown St., 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE: Miss Lois Johnson, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG: Miss Clara Wall, Wallburg, N. C. 

G. A. LEADERS 
CHURCHLAND: Clara Mae Shoaf, Linwood, N. C, R. 2. 
LEXINGTON: Mrs. J. M. Hayes, Lexington, N. C. 
MILLS HOME: Mrs. R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: Mrs. W. Albert Shoaf, 1915 Longview 

Drive, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE: Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG: Mrs. J. Walter Tuttle, Wallburg, N. C. 

R. A. LEADERS 
CHURCHLAND: Louise Barnes, Linwood, N. C, R. 1. 
MILLS HOME: Mrs. Mattie Scarbrough, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: Mrs. Robert Hampton, R. F. D. 6, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. 

THOMASVILLE: Mrs. C. F. Lambeth, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG: Mrs. J. Walter Tuttle, Wallburg, N. C. 

SUNBEAM LEADERS 
CHURCHLAND: Mrs. High Davis, Lexington, N. C, R. 5. 
DENTON: Mrs. A. L. Snider, Denton, N. C. 
HOLLOWAYS: Miss Elva Crook, High Rock, N. C, R. 1. 
LEXINGTON: Mrs. Emory Lanning, Lexington, N. C. 



28 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



MILLS HOME: Miss Mary Cook, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: Alfred Hartman, 629 Nissen Bldg., Win- 
ston-Salem, N. C. 
STONERS GROVE: Mrs. A, F. Wafford, Southmont, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE: Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG: Mrs. William King, Wallburg, N. C. 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this association to furnish 
the gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the 
association, and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 
MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the 
association, pastors of the churches in the association, and mes- 
sengers from the churches. Each church shall be entitled to 
three messengers and one additional messenger for every 50 
members or fraction thereof over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, 
vice-moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be 
elected each year by the association at its annual meeting and 
shall hold office until their successors are elected. The duties of 
the officers shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in 
like organizations, or as defined by the association from time to 
time. 

BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 
Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee 
each year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel 
preached in all parts of the association, and to attend to all busi- 
ness of the association between the sessions and to make such 
reports as they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the 
association. The association may appoint or elect such other 
boards or committees from time to time as circumstances may 
require. 

TIME OF MEETING 
Article 6. The association shall meet annually, on Tuesday 
after the first Sunday in September. The moderator may at the 
request of the Executive Committee change the time or the place 
of meeting of this association when it may be deemed by him 
not expedient to meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive 
Committee may fill any vacancy occurring between meetings of 
the association. 

AMENDMENTS 
Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular 
session of the association by a two-thirds vote of the number 
present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules 
of Order for Parliamentary Authority. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



WHERE HELD 

Uamestown 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting H. 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 

3 Big Creek 

Uamestown 
Liberty 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3 Big Creek 
2Pine Meeting H. 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H. 

Summerville 

Lexington 

Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H 

High Point 

Kernersville 

Holloways 

Pleasant Grove 

Denton 
5Piney Grove 

Rich Fork 

Abbotts Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

Lexington 

Lick Creek 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H. 



PREACHER 
Geo. W. Purefoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
flli Carroll 
reter Owen 
uciijamin Lanier 
^iii Carroll 
jooian Wiseman 
iienjanciin Lanier 
Bai ion Roby 
benjamin .Lanier 
w m. Turner 
AUred Kinney 
H m. Turner 
vV m. Turner 
rJenjamin Lanier 
Azanan W illiams 
iienjamin Lanier 
rt m. Turner 
Z. Minor 
Jenjanun Lanier 
.-lured Kinney 
benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Lienjamin Lanier 
iVm. Turner 
j. B. Jackson 
s*\ H. Jones 
i. W. Tobey 
■>V. H. Hammer 
an account of 
vV. T. Walters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stokes 
Wm. Turner 
vV. M. Wingate 
H. Morton 
inomas Carrick 
A. F. Redd 
0. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
3. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
3. H. Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 
J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J. K. Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. M. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 
C. A. G. Thomas 
Henry Sheets 
W. A. Smith 
Geo. P. Harrill 



MODERATOR 
Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eii Carroll 
Eii Carroll 
utersriom Tuessey 
benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
W m. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
H. Morton 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
V/ m. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 



ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 
ams 



CLERK 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
Azariah Will 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
by Civil War 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



30 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION — Continued 



Year 


WHERE HELD 




PREACHER 


MODERATOR 


CLERK 


1905 




John R. Miller 




Henry Sheets 


1966 


Thomas ville 


J. 


S. 


Farmer 


J3.rn.Gs k>ixiith 


Henry Sheets 


1907 


allburg 


Dr 


R 


T. Vann 


T W "NTnwpll 

O > VV . XN UWCI1 


l . o. V auu 


1908 


Denton 


M. 


L. 


Kesler 


U . VV • XN UWcll 


P Vnnn 

jt . o. v ann 


1909 


Liberty 


S. 


D. 


Swaim 


Uanrv SlViPP'fQ 
xi trin y oiicclo 


l. . o ■ v a ii ii 


1910 


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0. 


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Keller 


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Martin 


Henry Sheets 


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1912 


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A. 


Keller 


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1914 


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Martin 


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Henry Sheets 


1915 


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A. 


Keller 


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Henry Sheets 


1916 


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Mercer 


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Fred D. Hale 


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1918 


Lxeington 


M. 


L. 


Kesler 


IV. O. UlCCll 


A.rchibald Johnson 


1919 


Denton 


R. 


E. 


White 


R. S. Green 


Archibald Johnson 


1920 


New Friendship 


J. 


S. 


Hardaway 


R. S. Green 


Archibald Johnson 


1921 


Churchland 


M. 


L. 


Kesler 


R. S. Green 


Archibald Johnson 


1922 


Summerville 


V/. 


A 


Hough 


R. S. Green 


Paul C. Newton 


1923 


Abbotts Creek 


W. 


L. 


Barrs 


Archibald Johnson 


Paul C. Newton 


1924 


Reeds 


c. 


H. 


Trueblood 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1925 


Liberty 


c. 


A. 


Owens 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1926 


Rich Fork 


E. 


N. 


Gardner 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1926 


Thomasville 


H. 


T. 


Penry 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1928 


Holloways 


M. 


L. 


Kesler 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 


1929 


Stoners Grove 


J. 


M. 


Hayes 


Archibald Johnson 


"Sam J. Smith 


1930 


Abbotts Creek 


M. 


L. 


Kesler 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smith 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Eldorado; 
4 Now Clemmonsville; 5 Now Wallburg. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE W. M. U. 
of the Liberty Association 



The Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Association 
held its twenty-fourth annual session with the society of Hollo- 
ways Baptist church on August 21, 1930. The meeting was 
called to order at 10 o'clock by the superintendent, Miss Sallie 
L. McCracken. The opening hymn was "Come Thou Almighty 
King." It was followed by the watchword for the year, "Be Ye 
Steadfast." The association joined in singing another hymn, 
"Faith of Our Fathers." The devotional was conducted by Mrs. 
G. A. Martin, of Denton. She used Colossians, 4th chapter, and 
stressed five important characteristics of Christians. Miss Tela 
Beanblossom gave the visitors a cordial welcome and Mrs. Vera 
Putnam responded in a few words. 

The reports of officers were given. Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, the 
Personal Service chairman, gave her report, which showed a 
number of services of various kinds rendered. Twelve societies 
had helped the sick by rendering different kinds of services. 
Thirteen had helped needy families, three had helped underpriv- 
ileged children, two had conducted Vacation Bible Schools. Fif- 
teen societies reported that they had done personal service work. 

In the absence of our Mission Study chairman, Mrs. W. J. 
Griffin, Miss McCracken read this report. This showed that 
mission study classes had been held in 30 societies, 295 had been 
enrolled in classes, 153 seals and 129 certificates had been 
awardecL 

The treasurer's report was read as follows: 



Balance in treasury January 1, 1929 $4.17 

Received for associational expenses 36.50 



Total $40.67 

Disbursements : 

Check to Miss Laura Lazenby for expenses Charlotte Div. $5.00 

Programs associational meeting 3.00 

Mrs. R. S. Green for postage 1.70 



Total $9.70 

Balance December 31, 1929 $30.97 



The group leaders, Mrs. G. C. Palmer, of Denton; Mrs. A. F. 
Warfford, of Lexington, and Mrs. R. S. Green, of Thomasville, 
then gave their reports. They told of meetings that had been 
held, and other work that had been accomplished. 

The superintendent's annual address was given by Miss Sallie 
L. McCracken. Her subject was "Review and Preview of W. M. 
U. Work in the Liberty Association." This address was encour- 
aging and inspiring, so much so that a motion was made that it 
be published in Charity and Children and in the associational 
minutes. Mrs. J. M. Hayes then sang a beautiful solo, "The 
Ninety and Nine." 

The roll call of W. M. U. societies was then taken up. All the 
societies responded with good reports. 

The following visitors were recognized and welcomed to the 
meeting: Miss Pearle Johnson, a missionary in Shanghai, China; 
Miss Clara Johnson, of Apex; also Rev. H. T. Penry, pastor of 



32 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Holloways church with which the society was holding its meeting. 

Miss Roxie Sheets gave an impressive talk on "Five Prescrip- 
tions for a Good W. M. U. Member." She also stressed the need 
of our mission magazines in all our homes. A motion was later 
made that her talk be published in "Charity and Children." 

Many leaders of societies discussed the changing of the time 
from August to April. Most of them were heartily in favor of 
it. After the appointment of committees the societies adjourned 
for dinner. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

After reassembling, a hymn, "Jesus Calls Us," was sung by 
the congregation, after which we were led in prayer by our 
associate superintendent, Mrs. R. S. Green. Miss Pearle Johnson 
then gave an interesting and inspiring talk on "Mission Work in 
China." This was made even more impressive by the Chinese 
costume she wore and the curios that she exhibited. 

The young people's program was conducted by our junior su- 
perintendent, Miss Mary Misenheimer. Miss Misenheimer de- 
clined to serve another year. The associational members, realiz- 
ing that she had rendered faithful services were reluctant in 
accepting her resignation. 

The roll call of junior societies was taken. After some good 
reports from most of the young people's societies, a playlet was 
given by the Y. W. A.'s of Holloways church. In this the great 
need of our mission magazines in our homes was strikingly em- 
phasized. 

REPORTS OF THE COMMITTEES 

The nominating committee was composed of Mrs. J. M. Hayes, 
Mrs. L. E. Teague, Miss Minnie Haworth, Mrs. B. R. Cross and 
Mrs. R. A. Allen. They submitted the following names: 

Superintendent — Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thomasville. 

Associate superintendent — Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville. 

Secretary-treasurer — Miss Esther Newton, Thomasville. 

Junior superintendent — Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Lexington. 

Mission study leader — Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, R. 4. 

Personal service chairman — Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Thomasville. 

The committee on time and place was composed of Miss Roxie 
Sheets, Mrs. Alda Craver and Mrs. W. A. Beeker. They decided 
on Smith Grove church and for the time to be changed to Thurs- 
day after the third Sunday in April. 

The courtesy committee which was composed of Mrs. G. A. 
Martin, Mrs. B. F. Lee and Mrs. R. D. Covington, reported as 
follows: 

We, your courtesy committee for the W. M. U. of the Liberty 
Association, extend our sincere thanks and gratitude to the 
pastor and W. M. S. of Holloways church for their gracious hos- 
pitality and delicious luncheon. 

To Miss Sallie McCracken for her history and comprehensive 
review and preview of the W. M. U. of the Liberty Association, 
which we think should be placed in permanent form. 

To Miss Roxie Sheets for her practical and helpful talk and 
to Mrs. Hayes for her inspiring solo. 

We wish to thank those who furnished the attractive and 
helpful posters. 

We were led to higher heights and new resolves by Miss Pearle 
Johnson's wonderful presentation of China's needs, and by the 
closing inspirational address by Mr. R. D. Covington. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 3 



The obituary committee gave this report: 

The obituary committee has the names of two members to 
record who have passed to the great beyond since our last meet- 
ing, Mrs. Fred Sowers of the Lexington society and Mrs. J. F. 
Westmoreland of the Thomasville society. We would bear 
tribute to their faithfulness and loyalty, remembering the 
promise, "Be thou faithful unto death and I will give thee 
crown of life." 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. R. S. GREEN, 
MRS. WILL H. JOHNSON, 
MRS. R. L. PALMER. 

Our centennial year was discussed by Mrs. R. S. Green. She 
stressed the importance of observance of fellowship week, and 
urged that remaining pledges be paid. 

Mr. R. D. Covington led us into spiritual heights in his devo- 
tional address on the great subject "I, if I be lifted up will draw 
all men to me." 

The congregation joined in singing "Blest Be the Tie," after 
which Mr. B. L. West led the association in a closing prayer. 



A REVIEW AND A PREVIEW OF W. M. U. WORK IN THE 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

(Paper read by Miss Sallie McCracken at the meeting of Liberty 
W. M. U. and published by request.) 

For our information and encouragement I wish to review the 
work of our Union since its organization in 1907. Of course, 
there were some organized societies in several of the churches 
before the organization of the Union. The earliest report I can 
find is that of the Lexington Society in 1894. They had fifteen 
members in that year and contributed $18.50 which was divided 
among State, Home and Foreign Missions. In 1896 the Thomas- 
ville Society reported $14.00. 

The organization in 1907 of the Woman's Missionary Union, 
auxiliary to the Liberty Baptist Association, was composed of 
the Lexington Society and Sunbeams, Thomasville Society and 
Sunbeams, Wallburg Society and Sunbeams and the societies of 
Jersey and Denton. In that year the contributions amounted to 
$317.61. The contributions grew steadily from year to year, but 
we will pass over ten years and note the report for 1917 when 
there were nine W. M. S. roganizations, six Sunbeams and two 
Y. W. A.'s, and one R. A. The contributions in that year amount- 
ed to $1,339.77. In addition to the regular contributions it was 
decided that the Union establish a memorial in memory of Mr. 
James Smith, who had been the moderator of the Liberty Asso- 
ciation for many years. 

In 1923 Lexington, Orphanage and Thomasville societies fur- 
nished rooms in the Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem. Also 
in this year nearly a thousand dollars was contributed to the 
Baptist Hospital through the various societies of the association. 

In 1926 the association year was changed so as to bring it in 
line with the calendar year, this plan being adopted by all the 
associations of the state. 

In 1927 a field worker was employed to do some work in the 
association, the state office paying one half of the expenses. The 
contributions in this year amounted to $4,183.79. Let us re- 



34 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



member that this is twenty years since the organization of the 
Union when the contribution was $317.61. The organization 
had also grown to 16 W. M. S. and 15 societies for young people. 

In 1928 the association was organized into groups, the Denton, 
Lexington and Thomasville group. A small mission study library 
was assembled which has been growing slowly since that time. 
A contribution of more than forty dollars was sent to furnish a 
helper for our missionary H. H. McMillan in Ghina. The contri- 
butions reported in this year amounted to $6,752.60 and the 
state banner was won. 

In 1929, last year, and the year for which we are reporting 
today the contributions amounted to $6,899.56 with 16 W. M. S., 
5 Y. W. A.'s, 6 G. A.'s, 2 R. A.'s and 11 Sunbeams. Thirteen so- 
cieties had mission study classes; fourteen observed the seasons 
of prayer for missions and fifteen societies contributed to the 
Christmas offering. We are glad to report that one of our G. 
A. girls won in the Tithing Story Contest, Virginia May Griffin, 
of New Friendship Church, and daughter of our Mission Study 
Superintendent. 

While we have done nothing yet of which we may boast, yet 
I am sure it fills our hearts with joy as we go back and review 
our work up through these more than twenty years, to realize 
that we have been steadily growing — and let us hope, not only 
in numbers and contributions but also in love and devotion to 
our Master. It is said that we show how we love by the way we 
give, so if our love for our Master is measured by our gifts, we 
have gone a long way from our $317.61 in 1907 to our $6,899.56 
last year. 

PREVIEW 

May the review to which we have just listened lead us to 
quicken our steps, for the King's business requireth haste and 
the "fields are white already unto harvest." 

The Liberty Association has twenty-six churches within its 
bounds and I believe another was organized a week ago, making 
twenty-seven. We have a missionary society in only 16 of these. 
What about these other 10 or 11? Is it worth while to see that 
they are organized? See how our country has bounded forward 
in the last few years in so many ways, our beautiful highways 
stretch like ribbons across our state from one end to the other. 
Our splendid consolidated school buildings are found at proper 
intervals for every child to have the very best advantage for an 
education. Modern churches have either been built or fashioned 
out of the old ones by remodeling or making additions. But we 
are not keeping pace with all of this in our W. M. U. work in the 
Liberty Association. It is time for us to get busy, not for just 
half a dozen or so, but for all of us who love our Lord and long 
for the advancement of His Kingdom here on earth. 

But would this forward movement help in the building up of 
our churches? If not, then it would hardly be worth while. I 
would not hesitate to ask any pastor in the association if the 
missionary society in his church is not a strong arm, doing a 
large share in the carrying on of the work of the church. His 
reply would be that it makes a better informed church along all 
the lines of our work and deepens the spiritual life of the entire 
church. 

This month, August, the topic for our missionary meetings is 
"Notable Native Christians." The thought of each one of us 
goes immediately to Christians of other lands, China, Japan, 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 35 



Italy or Palestine. I dare say not ten of us have thought of it 
with the reference to our own land, in our own churches, yes, 
in our own missionary societies. Could you name some notable 
Christians in your society? Some that would furnish material 
for a missionary meeting for one of our mission stations in a 
foreign land? 

But how shall we make the start in this forward movement? 
First, we must give our own selves. Our lives are gifts from 
God and we should remember that he is expecting us to give an 
account some day of how they are spent. If they are consecrated 
to Him we will find joy in His service. 

Then we must give of our substance. "The earth is the Lord's 
and the fulness thereof." "He that giveth lendeth to the 
Lord." What sort of feeling is experienced by lending? Is 
there not a soul satisfaction that you have helped both the per- 
son to whom you have granted the favor and yourself also? Do 
you not expect to have your own repaid some day and often with 
interest? So we should feel about our giving, that it gives joy 
and satisfaction to our own soul and helps our Master in carry- 
ing out his work in the world. 

The gospel has been intrusted to us. What are we doing with 
it in the Liberty Association? It is not simply for the preachers 
and Sunday school teachers, but for every soul born into the 
Kingdom to have a share in spreading the gospel. 

With the review of the work and the marvelous growth of 
which I am sure you are hardly aware, and with this preview 
setting forth the work to be done, and the glorious accomplish- 
ment that may be consummated if "all have a mind to work" I 
trust that we may return to our homes with a new vision of the 
possibilities that lie in the bounds of our association, and a de- 
termination to do our part in the building of the Kingdom. If 
this is done there will be such an advancement in the next ten 
years that we will be amazed at the results, and the workers as 
they pass to their reward will hear the joyous greeting, "Enter 
thou into the joy of thy Lord." 



36 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



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Total for Local 
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Total for Local Church 
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40 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



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MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



41 



TABLE VI. B. Y. P. U.'S LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



<u c 
c o 



o Cm 



i O . T3 



PM 

CO 

CJJ g 

.5 5 

(3 

H >> 
6 5 



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a; 

03 £ 



Abbotts Creek 
Churchland .... 

Denton 

Jersey 

Lexington 

Mills Home 
Rich Fork .... 
Smith Grove 

Southside 

Tabernacle 

Thomasville 

Wallburg 

Welcome 



TOTALS. 



No 
No 
No 
No 

Yes | 
Yes 
No 
No 
No 
Yes 
Yes 
No 



-1 1 1- 



28 
22 
15 
48 



-1 1 1- 



1| 12 1 9| 11[ 331 1| 22|291|252|262|827|206|390|402| 34 



TABLE VIL WOMAN'S WORK LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 



CHURCHES g 


No. Y. W. A.'s 


No. G. A.'s 


No. R. A.'s 


No. Sunbeams 


Total W. M. U. 
Organizations 


W. M. S. 

Members 


Y.W.A. Members 


G. A. Members 


R. A. Members 


Sunbeam 
Members 


Total Members 
Enrolled 


Total Enrolled in I 
Mission Study 1 


Abbotts Creek 1| 








1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
1 
4 
5 
5 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
6 
5 


12 
16 
10 
15 
22 
15 
132 
50 
20 
12 
19 
24 
12 
21 
52 
23 










12 
16 
20 
35 
52 
15 
204 
308 
68 
26 
33 
24 
21 
37 
139 
60 


12 
6 


Center Hill l| 
















Churchland 1 i 






1 
1 
1 








10 

8 
15 




1 
1 






12 
15 






15 

















1 













1 1 1 


:::::: 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


35 


12 
57 
13 




25 
150 
18 
14 
14 


58 
165 
18 
9 
17 
20 
24 
25 
49 
24 


Mills Home 1 




2 
1 


1 
1 


51 
10 


Reeds 1 


1 


7 


Rich Fork 1 




































1 
1 
1 
1 








9 
16 
35 
10 
















Thomasville .1 

Wallburg .1 


1 
1 


2 
1 


1 
1 


16 
13 


30 
12 


6 
2 



TOTALS 16| 6[ 7| 4| 12| 451455 1 981124] 6 9 [ 3 2 4 1 1 7 1 4 42 



For W. M. U. Contributions See Tables 4 and 5. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 



North Carolina 

| | f| 

NINETY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 
Held with 
DENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Denton, North Carolina 
September 8-9, 1931 

I: ? I 



The Next Session will be Held Tuesday and Wednesday 
After the First Sunday in September, 1932 with 
the First Baptist Church, Lexington, N. O. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 



North Carolina 



NINETY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 
Held with 
DENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Denton, North Carolina 
September 8-9, 1931 



The Next Session will be Held Tuesday and Wednesday 
After the First Sunday in September, 1932 with 
the First Baptist Church, Lexington, N. C. 



Economy Printing Co., Union, S. C. 



INDEX 

Appointment of Committees ' 10 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 32 

Auxiliaries — Associational -3 

Baptist Institutions within Association 4 

Collections — Specials taken 11 & 22 

Carolina Ave. Church Received 13 

Church Clerks 45 

Church Treasurers 46 

Churches and Messengers 5 

Committees — Executive 28 

Finance 10 

On Nominations 10 

On Co-operative Work 10 

Program for 1932 28 

To Report 1932, Chairman 28 

On Time, Place and Preacher 10 

Promotion Every Member Canvass 24 

Constitution and By-Laws 36 

Date closing Associational Year 29 

Deceased Members 30 

Directories — Associational 3 

Church 32 

B. Y. P. U 32 

Ordained Ministers 32 

W. M. S 34 

Historical Table 37 

Meeting Place Changed 20 

Minute Fund Apportionment 18 

Officers — .Associational 3 

Organization 7 

Orphanage Representative 18 

Pastors of Association 32 

Reports — Biblical Recorder, Religious Literature 7 

B. Y. P. U.... 24 

Committee on Nominations 28 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 17 

Committee on State of Churches 21 

Committee on Finance 29 

Education 8 

Foreign Missions 16 

Hospitals 13 

Home Missions 15 

Ministerial Relief . 26 

Orphanage i 19 

State Missions 14 

Sunday Schools 23 

Treasurer 18 

Woman's Work V 12 

Executive Committee . 20 

Committee to Recommend Promotion Committee 24 

Resolution of Thanks 30 

Sermon, Annual 11 

Sunday School Superintendents 44 

Tables 43-48 

Visitors 6 

W. M. U. Auxiliaries and Officers 34 

Proceedings of Annual Meeting 43 



DIRECTORIES 



OFFICERS 



G. Wilson Miller, Moderator . . . 
E. F. Mumford, Vice-Moderator 

Sam J. Smith, Clerk 

Sam J. Smith, Treasurer 



Lexington, N. C. 

.Wallburg, N. C. 

Lexington, N. C. 

Lexington, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



J. M. Hayes, Chairman 



Lexington, N. C. 

Southmont, N. C. 

Thomasville, N. C. 

High Point, N. C, R. 4 

Denton, N. C. 

. . .Linwood, N. C, R. 2 



C. C. Wrenn 
L. E. Teague 



D. S. Hayworth 



A. L. Snider . 
W. H. Lomax 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES TO REPORT IN 1932 
State of Churches — M. O. Alexander, Thomasville, N. C. 
Home Missions — E. F, Mumford, Wallburg, N. C. 
Religious Literature, Recorder — B. K. Mason, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Baptist Hospitals — G. A. Martin, Denton, N. C. 
State Missions— E. F. Mumford, Wallburg, N. C. 
B. Y. P. U.'s— Walter Wafford, Lexington, N. C. 
Christian Education — C. R. Johnson, Erlanger, N. C. 
Foreign Missions — Miss Roxie Sheets, Lexington, N. C. 
Ministerial Relief — Archibald Johnson, Thomasville, N. C. 
W. M. U— Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 
Sunday Schools— R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. C. 
Orphanage — P. V. Critcher, Lexington, N. C. 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement — M. L. Kesler, Thomasville, 
N. C. 



Meeting was held with the church at Jersey Apr. 12, 1931. 
President — Rev. Walter Wafford, Lexington, N. C. 
Secretary— Sudie Belle Palmer, Linwood, N. C. 



Meeting was held with the church at Smith Grove April 29th, 
1931. 

Superintendent— Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 
Associate Supt— Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 



B. Y. P. U. 



W. M. U. 



4 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Secretary and Treasurer— Miss Esther Newton, Thomasville, N. C. 
Junior Supt.— Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Lexington, N. C. 
Personal Service Chrm.— Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Thomasville, N. C. 
Mission Study Chrm.— Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C.„ 
No. 4. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 
Have no associational Sunday School Convention. 

MEMBER STATE MISSION BOARD 

Dr. M. L. Kesler, Thomasville, N. C. 

BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS LOCATED IN ASSOCIATION 

The Mills Home— Established 1885 
General Manager — Dr. M. L. Kesler, Thomasville, N. C. 
Treasurer — R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. C. 
Trustees: 

B. W. Spillman, Kinston, N. C, Chairman. 
Thomas Carrick, High Point, N. C, Secretary. 
Term expiring: 

1931— B. W. Spilman, Kinston; C. L. Haywood, Durham; T. P. 
Pruitt, Hickory; Mrs. Fannie Moore, Gastonia. 

1932— 1. G. Greer, Boone; H. S. Stokes, Winston-Salem; Mrs. Bryon 
C Scott, Charlotte; R C Lawrence, Lumberton; Dr Glenn Choate, 
Salisbury 

1933— T B. Wheeler, Scotland Neck; J. W. Noell, Roxboro; Thos. 
Carrick, High Point; J. B. Stroud, Greensboro; A. E. Tate, High 
Point. 

1934 — W. A. Cooper, Raleigh; J. H. Canady, Kinston; L. L. Leary, 
Morehead City; R. L. Moore, Mars Hill. 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY, STANDING COMMITTEES, 
REPRESENTATIVES, AUXILIARY MEETINGS, ETC. 
Associational missionary or other paid employee — None. 
Standing committees — None. 
Representative of laymen's movement — none. 

The auxiliary meetings — The Association has no W. M. U. Aux- 
iliary, Sunday School Convention, B. Y. P. U. or Laymen's Conven- 
tion, which meets at the same time or during the sessions of the 
Association. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 5 



LIST OF MESSENGERS— 1931 SESSIONS 
ABBOTTS CREEK — Charley Bodenhammer, Sanford Hayworth, 

W. D. Spurgeon, D. S. Hayworth, Minnie Hayworth, Mrs. N. R. 

Teague, Grady Greene. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— H. D. Bradshaw, Mrs. H. D. Bradshaw, E. 

Z. Smith, Howard Hunt. 
CENTER HILL— Holt Brown, Floyd Owens, A. H. Michael, H. L. 

Miller, Mrs. Mary Owens, Mrs. Hugh Miller, Mrs. R. B. Sheets, Mrs. 

A. H. Michael. 

CHURCHLAND— W. H. Lomax, L. E. Rickard, W. Hence Beck, J. 
L. McBride, D. R. Kesler. 

DENTON— L. A. Tysinger, J. J. Snider, A. S. Miller, W. B. Russell, 
John L. Snider, R. A. Allen, A. L. Snider, Mrs. Will Harris, Mrs. V. 
K. Skeen, Mrs. O. L. Ward 

GRAVEL HILL— A. A. Loftin, Sam Scarlett, E. M. Russell, T. H. 
Davis, Oscar Tucker, Mrs. E. M. Russell. 

HOLLOW AYS— T. L. Palmer,J. A. McCarn, J. W. Lookabill, G. C. 
Palmer, W. E. Shirley, Geo. Workman. 

JERSEY:— W. C. Roach, S. A. Sharpe, R. F. Barnes, W. L. Smith, 
W. K. Trexler, R. L. Palmer, Miss Elizabeth Smith 

LEXINGTON— G. W. Miller, Sam J. Smith, Mrs. J. M. Hayes, 
Mrs. D. F. Conrad, H. C. Myers, Fred C. Sowers, Miss Callie Carroll, 
C. M. Wall, Sr., Mrs. D. S. Bennett, Fred C Wilson, P. A. Myers, Mrs. 
P. A. Myers, Mrs. Sam J Smith, Mrs John A. Sink, John A. Sink, 
A. J. Newton. 

LIBERTY— W. W. Whitaker, N. T. Kindley, H. P. May, C. O. 
Hepler, L. E. Hepler, J. A. Hepler, Mrs. W. H. Whitaker, Mrs. N. T. 
Kindley, Mrs. H. P. May, Mrs. L. E. Hepler, Mrs. Bessie Clodfelter, 
Mrs. J. A. Hepler, Miss Lois Hepler. 

LICK CREEK— W. L. D. Surratt, W. R. Cross, W. H. Jarvis, J. A. 
Kinney. 

MILLS HOME— Dr. M. L. Kesler, Miss Sallie McCracken, Rev. J. A. 
McMillan, R. D. Covington, Miss Annie Hall, W. L. Bowman, C. C. 
McKoin. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP — Erastus Swaim, Conrad F. Motsinger, Mrs. 
William J. Griffin, Mrs. Farris Swaim, Miss Ida Swaim, Maskey M. 
Smith. 

REEDS— C. L. Snyder, Frank Foster, J. N. Myers, N. C. Carter, R. 
W. Hege, Earley Snider. 

RICH FORK— Thomas Everhart, Will Leonard, Harvey Crews, 
David Clinard, O. F. Tate, Willie Bowers. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Miss Mary Swing, Mrs. J. H. GufTy, Mrs. 
J J. Garrick, Miss Agnes Hilliard. 



6 MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



SMITH GROVE— Rev. E. L. Bradley, Miss Ruth Snider, Miss 
Biddie Snider, J. S. Young, Troy Lanning, Mrs. E. R. Lanning, Mrs. 
Cora Beck. 

SOUTHSIDE— M. P. Workman, Mrs. N. G. Goodin, Mrs. Julia 

Beck. 

STONERS GROVE— Robert Barnes, Julius Warlord, Bruce Coleman, 
E. H. Warlord, A. D. Graves, L. E. Lookabill, C. C. Wrenn. 

SUMMER VILLE — L. C. Carrick, H. E. Gallimore, George Prank, 
Creola Carrick, Mary Ellen Davis, Myrtle Carrick, Olin Davis, Perry 
Daniel, Timp Bean, Minnie Morgan, Lucy Carrick. 

TABERNACLE— Mrs. W. F. Humphreys, Mrs. W. M. Miller, W. C. 
Darnell, Mrs. J. L. Hembree, Eddie Wiggs, Leroy Solomon, J. R. 
Leonard, L. E. Grubb, Miss Northa Carlton, James E. Pruitt. 

TAYLORS GROVE— Jerry Caldwell, Ralph Palmer, Mrs. L. L. 
Michael, Miss Pauline Coggins. 

THOMAS VILLE— Rev. M. O. Alexander, L. E. Teague, C. Woodrow 
'league, Miss Elizabeth Teague, C. M. Howell, Mrs. C. M. Howell, 
Mrs. Martha Russell, Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, W. G. Fitzgerald, Miss 
Anne Chisholm, Miss Myrtle Chisholm, Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Mrs. L. 
W. Hansell, Mrs. R. S. Greene, Mrs. Tom Kindley, Rev. J. D. Newton. 

WALLBURG— Mrs. J. W. Tuttle, Mrs H. F. Pardue, H. F. Pardue, 
J. W. Tuttle, Mrs. R. C. Fowler 

WALTERS GROVE— Not represented. 

WELCOME— Rev. E. C. Roach, Mrs. E. C. Roach, E. L. Davis, Mrs. 
E. L. Davis, W. S Disher, M L. Carver, Mrs. C. S. Haynes, Fred 
Leonard, Mrs. Fred Leonard, W. W. Brinkley. 

WESTFIELD — ■ 

VISITORS ENROLLED 
Dr. L. E. M. Freeman Meredith College, Raleigh, N. C. 
Dr. Lumpkins, Supt. State Baptist Hospital, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Dr. L. P. Smith, Clerk Pilot Mountain Association. 
Rev. S. F. Morton,Pilot Mountain Association. 
Rev. J. L. Kirk, South Yadkin Association. 
Rev. Hoyle Love, Piedmont Association. 
Rev. C. A. Upchurch, Supt. N. C. Anti-Saloon League. 

NEW PASTORS ENROLLED 
Rev. Walter Warlord, Pastor Sheets Memorial Church, Lexing- 
ton, N. C. 

Rev. O. P. Dix, High Point, N. C, Pastor of Gravel Hill Church. 
Rev. R. N. Honeycutt, Salisbury, N. C, Pastor of Jersey Church. 
Rev. S. B. Wilson, High Point, N. C, Pastor of Lick Creek Church. 



PROCEEDINGS 

of the 

NINETY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 
of the 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Held With the, 
Denton Baptist Church 
Denton, N. C. 



FIRST DAY 
Tuesday, Sept. 8th, 1931 

1. The Ninety-ninth Annual Session of the Liberty 
Baptist Association convenes with the Denton Baptist 
Church, Denton, N. C-, Tuesday, Sept. 8th, 1931, at 
9 :45 A. M. 

2. Devotional service is led by Rev. L. B. Wilson, 
pastor of the Lick Creek Church, using for the Scripture 
lesson the 12th chapter of Romans. 

3. G. Wilson Miller, Vice-Moderator, calls the Asso- 
ciation to order for the transaction of business. 

4. G. Wilson Miller, of Lexington, N. C, is elected 
Moderator by acclamation; E- F. Mumford, of Wallburg, 
N. C, is elected Vice-Moderator and Sam J. Smith, of 
Lexington, N. C, is elected Clerk and Treasurer. 

5. Rev. B. K. Mason reads the Report on Periodicals; 
on motion to adopt, the report is ably discussed by Rev. 
Mason and is adopted- 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS 

The basic principle of enlistment is information. An informed 
constituency is a responsive constituency. It is comparatively easy 
to lead an informed people. One of our greatest problems is to en- 
list our Baptist forces. 

Five-sixths of our people have no definite denominational in- 
formation, are circumscribed in their interest, are not concerned 
greatly in Baptist affairs, are unenlisted. Our leaders make their 
very earnest appeals; but, for the most part, only the interested, 
those who read our Baptist periodicals, make any sustained response. 
One of the best solutions of this problem is to get the right kind of 
information over into the homes of our people. 

Those who read the Biblical Recorder, Charity and Children, and 



8 MINUTES OP LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Home and Foreign Fields, respond to the call of our leaders because 
they are informed about the work we are, under God, trying to do. 
These publications, with the open Bible, should be in Every Baptist 
home. 

For about one hundred years, we have earnestly sought by personal 
subscription to put these papers into the homes of our people, and the 
enlisted have subscribed, but the great mass of the unenlisted have 
not been reached. This plan will never reach any great number of 
the unenlisted Baptists. 

The responsibility of getting the right kind of information, which 
our denominational papers carry, over into the homes of our people, 
the enlisted as well as the unenlisted, must be placed upon our lead- 
ers and the churches. Realizing this responsibility, unitedly our 
leaders and churches will surely turn to the budget plan with some 
reasonable hope of getting our Baptist papers in our Baptist homes. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. K. MASON, Committee. 

6. Rev. J. M. Hayes reads the report on Christian 
Education; on motion to adopt, the report is discussed 
in a convincing manner by Rev. J. M. Hayes and Dr. L. E. 
M. Freeman, of Meredith College, and is adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Southern Baptists have championed Christian Education from the 
beginnning of their organized work. It is true that there have always 
been some within our own ranks who by active opposition or in- 
difference have hampered the progress of this worthy cause. 
Christian Education was one of the chief causes of this division 
among North Carolina Baptists in the beginning of our organized 
work. But a century of progress in Christian Education has proven 
the wisdom of the far-sighted leadership of that early day. From 
the local community to the uttermost bounds of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention we find that wherever Christian schools have been 
established and maintained greatest progress has been made in the 
work of our great denomination. We do not wonder, therefore, 
that when our own great missionary, Matthew T. Yates, of China, 
stated if he had a sum of money to invest for the extension of 
Christ's Kingdom on earth he would invest that sum in Wake Forest 
College. The most loyal supporters of the program of our denom- 
ination are also supporters of Christian Education. 

Why Christian Schools? 

Christian Education is one of the fruits of Christianity. Just 
so long as Jesus prolongs His coming back to the earth, there will be 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



an incessant need of Christian Education. In this changing age 
of today, nearly everything else, except Christ and His teachings, 
has changed. Ideas in the social, political, industrial and educational 
realms of life are constantly changing. And the same may be said 
in the realm of religion. But Christ and His teachings have not 
changed, and will not change. Many have thought that liberty, 
education, wealth and science were sufficient cornerstones upon 
which an enduring civilization could be established, but with every 
passing year we are going to see, even more plainly, that a civiliza- 
tion that does not rest upon the eternal principles of Christianity 
must inevitably fall. The dark ages of history have always been 
those periods in which nations have seemed to think that they 
could get along without Christ. We are living in an age in which it 
began to look like that the great majority of people seemed to think 
that the chief ends of life were pleasure, wealth and power, and, it 
might be added as a fourth end, pagan culture. None of these 
things can save our civilization from destruction. As Lloyd George 
has so aptly said, "It is Christ, or chaos.' Nearly two thousand 
years ago, Jesus said, "T am the way, the truth, and the life." He is 
the only WAY still. But the nations of the earth are mighty slow 
iu finding it out. In fact, we Southern Baptists are slow in making 
ourselves believe this statement of our Lord. If all our number 
really believed it, the causes of our Convention, including our 
Christian schools, would not be suffering from the lack of proper 
support. 

If our civilization is to rest upon the principles of Christ's teach- 
ings' then we MUST have Christian schools. We cannot have 
Christian schools without the adequate support of Christian people. 
The State cannot teach Christianity. If we Baptists believe, there- 
fore, in Christian Education, we must have Christian schools. And 
these schools must be adequately supported. With the competition 
of highly equipped State schools, our Baptist schools will be poorly 
attended, if not finally deserted, unless our Baptist people adequately 
maintain them. Already we have more students from Baptist fam- 
ilies in State schools than in our own Baptist schools. Our own 
schools must have finely trained faculties, good equipment, and 
maintain as high standards as State schools. In addition, our 
schools must have a Christian atmosphere that cannot be equaled by 
State schools. 

The leadership of our denomination must come from our Christian 
schools. Our missionaries and preachers, in the main, come from 
them. A great per cent, of our lay leadership likewise comes from 
them. We see, therefore, if our denomination would make greater 



10 MINUTES OP LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



progress in the future, we must give greater support to our Christian 
schools. 

Our Assets 

Theological schools— Baptist Bible Institute, Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary, Southwest Theological Seminary and Training 
School, Baptist W. M. U. Training Sschool, with a combined enroll- 
ment of 977 students and a property value of $2,242,762.69. Senior 
colleges: Thirty in number, with an enrollment of 15,097 students 
and a property value $40,697,002.71. Junior colleges: Thirty-one in 
number, with an enrollment of 6,565 students and a property value 
of $11,457,297.71. Preparatory schools: Thirty in number, with 3,- 
418 students and a property value of $3,569,267.45. We have 1,900 
ministerial students in these schools. 

We have three Senior colleges in North Carolina, namely, Wake 
Forest, Meredith, and Chowan, with the following Junior colleges, 
Mars Hill, Campbell, Wingate and Boiling Springs. Wingate and 
Boiling Springs no longer receive aid from the Baptist State Con- 
vention. We have an enrollment in these schools of 2,103 students 
and a property value of $6,488,915.34. 

This report is concluded with a quotation from our own Dr. W. R. 
Cullom in his report to the last session of the Southern Baptist 
Convention. "No religious denomination can hope to perpetuate it- 
self today and at the same time function in a worthy way in the life 
of its generation without schools. These schools are essential in that 
it is hard to see how any other agency can produce for such a denom. 
ination a leadership that will be imbued with the spirit of its own 
history, principles and purposes. And without such leadership it is 
clear that any denomination is doomed." 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES M. HAYES. 

7- The Moderator at this time announces the appoint- 
ment of the following committees : 

On Digest of Church Letters: John Arch McMillan, 
Walter Wafford and Sam J. Smith. 

On Finance: L. E. Teague, L. E. Hepler and R. D. 
Covington. 

On Nominations: John Arch McMillan, A. L. Snider 
and C. M. Wall. 

On Time, Place and Preacher : W. G- Fitzgerald, G. W. 
Wall and G. C. Palmer. 

On Co-operative Work : M. 0. Alexander, J. D, New- 
ton and Fred C. Wilson. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 11 



On Obituaries : E. F. Mumford, G. A. Martin and H. 
T- Penry. 

8. After the singing of a hymn, the Association is led 
in prayer by R. D. Covington, Treasurer of the Mills 
Home, Thomasville, N. C. 

INTRODUCTORY SERMON 

9. Rev. M. 0. Alexander, pastor of First Baptist 
Church, Thomasville, N. C, preaches the Introductory 
Sermon, using as his text, Luke 14th chapter, 25th, 26th, 
27th and 33rd verses. His subject being, "What It Means 
to be a Christian." The sermon was ably delivered to an 
attentive audience, which overflowed the church. 

10. The Association adjourns at 12:30 P- M., to re- 
convene at 1.45 P. M. Prayer by Rev. J. M. Hayes, Lex- 
ington, N. C. 

Tuesday Afternoon Session 

11. The Association reconvenes at 1 :45 P. M. 

Rev. Earl L. Bradley, pastor of the Smith Grove and 
Churchland churches conducts the devotional, using as 
his Scripture Matthew 5:13 to 16 verses. Prayer by 
Rev. J. M. Hayes. 

12. At this time the Association is favored with a deep 
spiritual song by the Misses Annie and Myrtle Chisholm, 
of Thomasville, N. C. 

13. Rev. J. M. Hayes brings to the attention of the 
body the conditions and circumstances of Dr. J. L. Shinn, 
a former pastor in the Association, after which a col- 
lection is taken for his benefit, in which $39.55 is raised. 
A special prayer for Dr. Shinn is offered by Rev. G. A- 
Martin. 

14. Carolina Avenue Baptist Church, Thomasville, N. 
C, which organized during the year, presents a letter 
and makes application to be received into the body. 

The Moderator appoints as a committee to investigate 
the application, Dr. M. L. Kesler, Rev. J. M. Hayes and 
Rev; G- A. Martin. 

15. Miss Sallie McCracken, of the Mills Home, reads 
the report on W. M. U. ; after motion to adopt, the repo r t 
i& discussed by Dr. L. E. M. Freeman, of Meredith Col- 



12 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



REPORT OF W. M. U. WORK 

The Woman's Missionary Union, auxiliary to the Liberty Baptist 
Association at its meeting in August, 1930, decided to change the 
time of meeting until the spring, so our Association was held this 
year on April 29, with the Smith Grove Church. The societies were 
well represented and the program throughout was helpful and en- 
couraging. Mrs. W. N. Jones, our State President, was a welcome 
visitor and brought us a very inspiring message. 

As this is our twenty-fifth report, it might be of interest to take 
a backward look just for a little while. When we organized m 1907, 
five Woman's Missionary societies formed the Union, with three 
Sunbeam Bands under their care, the contributions in that year 
amounted to $317.61. Ten years later the adult societies had grown 
to nine, with nine for the young people, one R. A. and two Y. W. 
A 's having been organized, and the contributions amounted to $1,- 
339 77 Ten years later than this, 1927, we gave through the Union 
$4 183 79 And last year the gifts reported at this meeting amounted 
to $7 006.61. Last year we reported sixteen Woman's Missionary so- 
cieties with twenty-nine organizations for young people. This year 
we have twenty of the adult societies and thirty-two for the young 

PG Now we would not measure our success by money contributed, nor 
by the' number of societies organized, yet we do rejoice that we have 
had this part in the spread of the good news of the Gospel both at 
home and throughout the world. We lay special stress on the 
training of our young people and confidently expect this to yield an 
abundant harvest in the lives of these boys and girls as they grow up 
and become more efficient workers in the Kingdom. And our tramj 
ing is not limited altogether to our young people. We try to have at 
least two mission study classes in every society each year, thus keep- 
ing our women informed and interested in our mission work and the 
workers and their fields that are white unto the harvest and the 
laborers so few, on account of our inability to send recruits as th 
missionaries drop out. 

When the Emergency call came in the spring, a letter was sent 
to each society urging them to do their very best to help in the pay 
ment of the Convention debt and $922.35 has been contributed fo 
that purpose from our societies. Our Association was one out of th 
eighteen in the State to reach its quota last year. 

As we look back from the beginning of our twenty-five years o 
work we feel that much has been accomplished and that a grea 
work has been done, but when we turn to the present and on to th 
future and see the needs before us, we cannot feel so jubilant ov 



MINUTES OF' LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 13 



what has been done. However, we have a noble band of workers in 
our societies who find joy in service and we face the next twenty-five 
years with hopeful hearts and outstretched hands to those in need 
and trust that we may so pray and work and give that we may be 
worthy to be counted among the faithful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

sallie l. Mccracken. 

16. The committee heretofore appointed by the Mod- 
erator to investigate the application of Carolina Avenue 
Baptist Church for membership into the body recommend 
that it be received into the Association. 

The recommendation of the committee is unanimously 
adopted by the body and the delegates from the church 
are given the right hand of fellowship by the Moderator. 

17- Dr. Lumpkins, Superintendent of the Baptist Hos- 
pital at Winston-Salem, N. C, reads the report on Hos- 
pitals; motion to adopt, he discusses the report in an 
admirable way and the report is adopted. 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

I submit the following letter from Dr. G. T. Lumpkins, head of our 
Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem, as my report to the Association: 

"For eight years we have brought you the story of healing at the 
Baptist Hospital. Surely it bears the marks of Divine approval. 
Thousands have been healed and hundreds of lives saved. The last 
year has been our heaviest and our best. Contributions have been 
smaller; collections harder and free service greater. We are doing 
as much charity per month as we did the entire first year of our 
existence. 

"We have many things to be thankful for. During the year, Mr. E. 
L. Davis, President of our Board of Trustees, presented the Hos- 
pital with radium. It was a magnificierit gift and is providing a 
glorious service to hundreds of our people. He has set a wonderful 
example of sacrifice and interest for our people. We need $5,000.00 
right now to enlarge our equipment and improve our service. What 
a challenge is his gift to other Baptists of our State to help pro- 
vide better facilities for saving human life among our people. 

Another fine opportunity for furnishing a monumental service and 
for saving hundreds of lives is to remember the Hospital in your 
will. $15,000.00 will endow a bed and that bed will take care of 24 
persons per year on the average for all time. Think of it, brother, you 
can just keep on saving the lives of fathers, mothers and children 
as the years come and go by such a provision in your will. Make 



i4 minutes of Liberty baptist association 



plans to care for a bed or at least a part of a bed. 

"We need a larger patronage from Baptists who are able to pay 
for their care in the hospital. Our cost is as low as any well equipped 
institution; We have an equipment, a staff of physicians and 
nurses equal to the best. We have health conditions and an atmos- 
phere unsurpassed. Our records show that our service is the very 
best. It will pay you to come to us when you are sick. And then, 
you will help us render a larger service for our needy sick. 

"We are now caring for about $5,000.00 worth of charity a month. 
But all the income we receive to meet this great amount spent for 
charity does not quite reach $3,000.00 a month; to carry all this dif- 
ference in our overhead is impossible. 

"In order to meet this great demand, we are asking that the patient 
or the church asking charity will pay as much as $1.50 a day or 
about one-third of the cost. If our people will cooperate in this 
way, we will be able to take care of all the calls and pay our bills. 
Otherwise we cannot, and we shall be compelled to turn many away 
or go out of business. 

"We beg of you that you will not forget us and the poor suffering 
Baptists, but that you will give us a larger offering on Mothers' Day. 
We covet your interest and your prayers. Bring us your pay 
patients; send us your charity patients, and we will not fail you when 
you call on us, if you do not forget." 

Respectfully submitted, 

RONALD E. WALL. 

18. Rev. E. F. Mumford reads the report on . State 
Missions ; Rev. J. A. McMillan, the report on Home Mis- 
sions, and Rev. H. T. Penry the report on Foreign Mis- 
sions- 

On motion to adopt, the three reports are discussed by 
Dr. C. EL Maddry, of the State Baptist Board, and are 
adopted. During the discussions, he told of the dire 
needs of the different objects supported by the denom- 
ination in such a way that the tears were brought to the 
eyes of many in the audience. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

When the Baptist State Convention was organized in 1830 in 
Greenville, N. O, the Baptist leaders of that day advocated and 
planned for the employment of missionaries within the limits of the 
State of North Carolina. This has been the aggressive policy of the 
Convention all through the years. The growth and influence of the 
Baptists throughout the State is largely due to the work done 



MINUTES OF 1 LIBERTY 1 BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 



through State Missions. Hundreds of our strong churches today were 
once mission churches. 

The coming of the automobile, the building of good roads and the 
consolidation of schools in our state have brought about a far-reach- 
ing change which has brought our country and village churches face 
to face with difficult problems. There is now no special need of so 
many weak churches within a few miles of each other as in the days 
of bad roads. 

As far as it is possible, there should be a plan worked out by 
which the General Board could have established in every educational 
center a strong and well equipped church. To meet the great prob- 
lems now facing our country and village churches is one of the great 
tasks of the General Board. There is an urgent need of more ef- 
ficient leaders among our laymen, more money is needed to help the 
Board put into effect constructive plans. 

For the past few years our State Mission work has suffered greatly 
for lack of funds. Retrenchments along many lines have been made 
and this has weakened our cause. Missionaries have been discon- 
tinued, salaries have been cut and quite a number of our leaders 
have been dropped because there were not enough funds with which 
to carry on the work. 

Last year the General Board sent out eighty-six missionaries. 
This number has been reduced to seventy. The amount paid to 
these workers was $57,574.13 and the amount for this year will be 
$33,000.00. Shall we continue to retreat? God spoke to Moses and 
commanded him to speak to the children of Israel to go forward. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. P. MUMFORD. 

HOME MISSIONS 

All missions are one. The only division is one of territory. Home 
Missions is the term that carries with it the thought of a cooperative 
effort on the part of the Southern Baptists to carry the Gospel of 
Jesus Christ, in all its fullness, to certain groups within the borders 
of the Southland, Cuba, and the Canal Zone. A cooperative effort on 
the part of all the States can be done more efficiently and more 
economically than could be done by several State Conventions act- 
ing independently. The foreigners reach our land through a hun- 
dred ports, the Jews are in every town, the Indian has his reserva- 
tion in a number of States, and the negro is found throughout our 
Southland. It is better in every way to deal with these groups as 
units and not in sections divided up by State lines. 

The Home Mission Board is the agency of the Southern Baptist 



16 MINUTES OP LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Convention for doing this type of cooperative missionary work. The 
necessity for this Board, for the present, is now recognized by all and 
we are happy to know that it has passed through its former phase 
of doubtful business methods and has become a model Board of our 
Southern Baptist Convention, We recognize our responisbility for 
the spiritual training of the foreigner within our gates, the Jew, the 
Indian, and the negro and rejoice in the efficiency of our agency — 
the Home Mission Board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN ARCH MCMILLAN. 
OUR FOREIGN MISSION WORK 

We have made fine progress on all our mission fields during the 
past year, and we have made strenuous effort to reach our people 
dunng the past year, with our Foreign Mission message. We have 
been delighted to note the interest in Foreign Missions. 

An earnest effort was made to help pastors and people see the 
triumph of the Gospel in the fourteen countries in which Southern 
Baptists are doing Missionary Work; the urgent need of larger 
present support of the work already undertaken; and the challenge 
of the great unfinished task. 

We spend much time worrying about our bank indebtedness and 
lose sight sometimes of the debt of gratitude, sympathy, comrad- 
ship, and stewardship that we owe to the races of men. 

We must keep in mind the comprehensiveness of our work, we 
must not think of it as just one phase of our work, but a combina- 
tion of all our work. 

We have 423 Foreign Missionaries, and 2,045 native missionaries, 
which is, perhaps, as large as is employed by all our State Mission 
Boards of the Southern States. 

We have five worthwhile publishing houses and with these we are 
trying to meet the need, the most opportune need of literature ever 
presented to evangelizing people. 

The educational department has had a year of progress. Our 
schools have been crowded with students. And we have had to turn 
many away. 

Two of our hospitals have been closed but the others have had a 
record year. 

It has been a year of wide-spread revivals. In Roumania alone 
last year there were baptized 5,500. 

If it were possible for our Convention to provide the Foreign 
Board with $1,500,000 for four years, we could guarantee to pay off 
all our debt and strengthen the hands of our missionaries now over- 
worked. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 



And the Board wishes to say with all earnestness that the South- 
ern Baptist Convention has launched a Foreign program which 
cannot be supported on the present scale of contributions from 
Southern Baptists. 

Unless the receipts are materially increased for next year, an in- 
crease in debt is inescapable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. T. PENRY. 

19. Rev. B. K. Mason makes motion that the Liberty 
Association put on the Every Member Canvass and Pro- 
motion Work, as proposed by the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, and that Rev. M- L. Kesler, Rev. J. A. McMillan 
and G. W. Miller be named as a committee to recommend 
a Promotion Committee for the Association composed of 
nine persons. 

20. The Association adjourns at 4:15 P. M., to recon- 
vene at 7:45 P. M., being dismissed by Rev. J. A. Mc- 
Millan. 

Tuesday Evening Session 

21. Dr. A. C. Reid, of Wake Forest College, delivers 
an able address on "Preparations for Christian Work." 

SECOND DAY 

Wednesday Morning Session 

22 The Association convenes at 9:45 A. M. The de- 
votional is conducted by Rev. R. L. West, pastor of the 
Southside and Carolina Avenue Churches at Thomas- 
ville, N. C. Misses Annie and Myrtle Chisholm again 
delight the members of the body with a song. 

The committee on Time, Place and Preacher makes 
report, which is adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 
FOR 1932 SESSION 
Place: Lexington, Lexington, N. C. 

Time: Tuesday and Wednesday after the first Sunday in Septem- 
ber, 1932. 

Preacher: L. A. Martin, Denton, N. C. 
Alternate: E. F. Mumford, Wallburg, N. C. 



1$ MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23. The Association, on motion, votes that the min- 
utes of the Associational W. M. U. meeting, held at 
Smith Grove Church on April 29, 1931, be embodied in 
the minutes of this body. 

24. The Treasurer's report is made at this time by 
Sam J. Smith, Treasurer. The report is adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

I submit herewith my report as treasurer of the Association for 
the year ending Sept. 7, 1931. 

RECEIPTS 

Abbotts Creek $ 6.00 Reeds 5.00 

Center Hill 2.00 Rich Fork 4.00 

Churchland 6.00 Smith Grove 4.00 

Denton 6.00 Southside 3.00 

Gravel Hill 1.00 Stoners Grove 6.00 

Holloways 1.65 Summerville 3.00 

Jersey 5.00 Sheets Memorial 1.00 

Lexington 25.00 Tabernacle . ." 4.00 

Liberty 4.00 Taylors Grove 1.00 

Lick Creek 3.00 Thomasville 16.00 

New Friendship 5.00 Wallburg 6.00 

Orphanage 12.00 Walters Grove , , 00 

Westfield , 00 Welcome 3.00 



Total Receipts $132.65 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Charity and Children for printing Minutes $100.00 

Express on Minutes 1.08 

Phone Calls .1.80 

Postage 5.40 

Stationery 6.00 

Sam J. Smith for service as Clerk 18.37 



Total $132.65 

Balance due Sam J. Smith, Clerk $ 11.63 

SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer. 

25. Rev. Walter Wafford reads the report on The 
Mills Home; on motion to adopt, the report is forcibly 
discussed by Rev. Walter Wafford, R. D. Covington, Rev. 
G. A. Martin, and is adopted. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 



REPORT ON THE MILLS HOME 

The most perplexing problem facing government, church and so- 
ciety at large, is what can we do to help those who are crying out 
for help in order that they may have enough to eat. It is also the 
most challenging field for practical Christianity. On every hand we 
hear the cries for help. In the report to the General Board , the 
General manager says, "For more than 25 years these cries have 
been coming to me, but there is a bitter pathos not heard before." 
During the past year 915 cases came before the administration, and 
only 75 of these could be cared for. 1,353 appeals for help came to 
Mother's Aid, and 609 could not be even investigated, or helped in 
any way. 

Alongside the increasing cries for help, even admission into the or- 
phanage, comes the falling off of the regular contributions to the 
orphanage. On June 16, 1931, the Mills Home was $20,000.00 in debt, 
and $8,500.00 behind the regular contributions of this period a year 
ago. Behind this is, of course, the present economic chaos, and 
there is also the fact that the distressing drives for other causes, as 
bad as they are in need, have hurt the orphanage collections. 

In spite of these two agonizing and perplexing problems, the in- 
creasing cry for help, the falling off of the regular collections, the 
Mills Home has done good work for the past year. It had enrolled in 
June 16, 1931, 635 children, of these 136 being cared for in the 
Kennedy Home. In addition there were 286 children at home with 
68 mothers, cared for through Mother's Aid. Counting those who 
were graduated from the Home during the year, the Mills Home 
cared for a thousand boys and girls during the year. 

And now a word as to the cost of caring for these children. Last 
year the average per capita cost for caring for 636 children at the 
Mills Home and the Kennedy Home was $23.53 per month. 

In face of the problems confronting the Mills Home, what can it do? 
It cannot retrench in service. By all means it must hold certainly the 
present amount of work it is doing. The rest is with the churches; 
every church giving a regular once-a-month offering to the Mills 
Home through the Sunday School, and increasing the Thanksgiving 
offering. Oh, how our churches, and our Christian people need to 
recognize the Biblical plan of giving. Then the Mills Home, and the 
other causes of this denomination, would not have to go in debt, or 
suffer from the lack of funds to carry on the work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER L. WARFFORD, 



80 MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



26. The report of the Executive Committee is read by 
Rev. J. M. Hayes, Chairman of the committee, and the 
report on State of the Churches is read by Rev. Richard 
L, West. Op motion to adopt, the two reports are dis- 
cussed by Rev. J. M. Hayes, Sam J. Smith and <are 
adopted. 

REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Upon the recommendation of your committee, aid was given by 
the General Board to Sheets Memorial, of Lexington, to help pay 
the pastor's salary. For the last three months, we regret to say, 
this aid has been discontinued because of the shortage in contribu- 
tions received by the General Board. The pastor, Brother Walter 
Warfford, is giving the same time and effort to the church notwith- 
standing the fact that this aid by the General Board has been dis- 
continued. This church, organized one year ago, with a membership 
of less than thirty in number, now has a membership of 127 and a 
Sunday School enrollment of 250. Their plant, with an indebtedness 
of around $500.00, is worth $4,500.00. 

Some time preceding the annual Thanksgiving offering to the 
orphanage, your committee sent out a letter to the pastors and 
superintendents of the Association, urging each church to do its best 
for the Mills Home offering. 

Your committee has made no effort to develop fields among country 
churches. We would be glad to see every church in our Association 
so arranged in a field that its pastor could live in the central part of 
the field and devote his entire time to visiting, teaching and preach- 
ing to the members of the various churches composing his field. We 
do not doubt that this is an ideal arrangement, but we are not pre- 
pared to state how the ideal can be speedily realized. 

Immediately upon receiving information of the most regrettable 
destruction by fire of the Lick Creek Church building, your committee 
directed its attention to a substitute meeting place for the present 
session of our Association. The thoughtful and generous pastor of 
the Denton Congregation came to our relief with the proposal that 
his congregation entertain the Association. On behalf of the Asso- 
ciation, now assembled, your committee desires to thank the good 
people of the Denton Church for their cordial invitation and most 
hospitable entertainment. We, also, take this opportunity to express 
oMr deep regret to our sister church, Lick Creek, at the loss of their 
building, and to assure them of our sympathy, love, and prayers. 
Jlre has separated them from their building, yet it is comforting to 
know that nothing can separate them from the love of God, which is 
in Christ Jesus or Lord. 



MINUTES OP LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 



Your committee concludes its report with a word of exhortation, 
namely, that every pastor and leader and worker in every church 
of our Assciation begin now to pray and to plan for an every mem- 
ber canvass this fall that will reach every member in every church. 
With the obligations upon our beloved denomination that must be 
met, if our integrity is to be maintained; with the challenge of a 
suffering and dying world, and Christ's own commandment to 
preach His Gospel to EVERY creature in all the world; with the 
ever-increasing forces of the anti-Christ charging at our strong- 
holds of faith— with all these considerations to arouse every true 
follower of Jesus, surely the curse of the Lord will be upon those 
who will be unwilling to do less than their best. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. M. HAYES, for the Committee. 

REPORT ON STATE OF CHURCHES 

Our Association of twenty-six churches is looked upon as one of 
the most active of the sixty -nine that compose our State Baptist 
Convention, and we are a great body of Baptists and our churches 
are composed of some of the greatest and best people to be found 
anywhere. We commend all the churches which have done any 
woi-k ,some of them have wrought nobly in the face of distressing 
conditions, and others have done little or nothing. In ail brotherly 
love, we repeat the statement of last year. We do not co-operate as 
we should. First of all, our pastors do not all enter into the co-op- 
erative work of our associated churches. Six pastors out of seventeen 
pastoring churches in our Association have manifested no interest of 
any kind either in our pastors' conferences or in our co-operative 
efforts, since our Association met a year ago. The churches them- 
selves ought to see to it that they are kept informed and that they 
share proportionately all of our Association and Convention respon- 
sibilities. 

Until the individual members of our churches assume their re- 
sponsibilities in the local churches in all matters concerning the 
church, spiritual, financial and especially in the matter of calling 
pastors, we cannot greatly improve our present situation. 

We thank God for the great work we have been able to accom- 
plish, and the digest of church letters will show just how great this 
work is. We deplore the fact that we do so little as compared with 
our great possibilities. We are all agreed that we need a great spirit- 
ual awakening. Some of our churches can scarcely be called mission- 
ary, since they have ceased to function in our missionary program 
of giving to and teaching missions. Just one -half of our churches 



22 MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



have any training service at all for young Christians. Ten of the 
twenty-six churches have no missionary society. Nine churches re- 
ported not a single baptism last year. Four churches did not observe 
either of the ordinances last year. Four churches did not receive a 
copy of the Recorder in their entire membership last year. Only 
one church does not have a Sunday School. Seventeen churches 
have not graded their Sunday Schools. Let the reports show what 
they show this year. May we be willing to face the facts, and bind 
ourselves together in brotherly love to put forward the Kingdom in 
the future in a greater way than we have done heretofore. 

May we be given through sincere dedication of ourselves and honest 
hard work more active churches and a more enthusiastic co-operative 
work. 

Cordially, 

M. O. ALEXANDER. 

27. The Association adjourns at 12:30 P- M., to re- 
convene at 1 :45 P. M. 

Wednesday Afternoon Session 

28. The Association reconvenes at 1 :45 P. M. 
Prayer by the Moderator, G. W. Miller. 

±he aevotional is conducted by Rev. C. R. Johnson, 
pastor ot the t abernacle Church at Erlanger, N. C. 

29. Rev- 8. B. Wilson, pastor of the Lick Creek Church, 
makes motion, that Rev. C. A. Upchurch, Superintendent 
oi tne Anti-baioon .League of North Carolina, who has 
been recognized by the body as a visitor, be allowed 
tmrty minutes to talk on Temperance. 

The motion is unanimously carried and Rev. Upchurch 
taiKS for thirty minutes on the evils of intoxicating 
drinks. 

Dr. M. L. Kesier moves that a collection be taken for 
the benefit of the Anti-Saloon League of North Caro- 
lina. The motion is adopted, and the collection is taken, 
m which the sum of $17.66 is raised and turned over to 
Mr. Upchurch. 

30. A. J. Newton reads the report on Sunday Schools; 
on motion to adopt, the report is ably discussed by Mr. 
Newton and is adopted. 



MINUTES OP LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 



REPORT ON THE STATE OF THE SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

At the 100th annual session of the Baptist State Convention held 
at Raleigh in November, 1930, Perry Morgan, Secretary, reported that 
the Sunday Schools of our denomination had witnessed an increase 
in enrollment and attendance. The number of Sunday Schools was 
2,299, with a total membership of 355,763. The increase in the en- 
rollment was 14,628. Only 85 churches out of 2,384 reported no 
Sunday School. He points with pride to this great progress. 

Let us look at our own Association — The Liberty: 



1928 

Total Enrollment 5183 

Average Attendance 2970 

1929 

Total Enrollment 5571 

Average Attendance 3005 

1930 

Total Enrollment 5694 

Average Attendance 3422 



The figures above show that there was an increase in average at- 
tendance 1929 over 1928 of 35, and an increase in 1930 over 1929 of 
417. 1931 figures are not available for this report. All save one or 
two of our churches have had a Sunday School for the past several 
years. 

We can see from the facts above that we have been making a 
steady growth in attendance and enrollment, for which, of course, we 
are very proud; however, we have not done our best, and, therefore, 
have failed to do our duty. 

Perhaps there is no organization within the church of so vast 
importance as the Sunday School. It is this agency of the church 
which has been so neglected. We believe its importance cannot be 
overestimated, and its mission should not be crippled or its pro- 
gram stayed by the hand of neglect. In the Sunday School Manual 
by Spilman and others we read: 'The Ministry of Jesus and that of 
the New Testament churches comprised two essential elements, 
teaching and preaching. Following the example of Jesus and of the 
New Testament churches, the churches of our day conduct two dis- 
tinct but supplemental services, one for teaching the Word and an- 
other for preaching the Word." The Sunday School "is to be di- 
rected by the church and guided by the Holy Spirit, just as is the 
service for preaching." If we would follow the Holy Spirit, we would 
really make the Sunday School the recruiting station for the church 
and for God; we would write full the church roll of active, devoted 



24 MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Christians. Our Sunday Schools are not reaching the people and are 
not training and teaching as we are required to do. Jesus excelled 
as a "Teacher" and His mission of old is our example for leader- 
ship today. Someone has said that, "we can't go beyond Him"— 
See Luke 6:39-40 for the following: "He spoke a parable unto 
them; can the blind lead the blind? Shall they not both fall into 
the ditch? The disciple is not above his Master: but everyone that 
is perfect shall be as his Master." 

If we would take a religious census in all our churches in the 
Liberty Association, we would see how far short our Sunday Schools 
are falling in their duty. This would open our eyes to our duty when 
we took a look at the list of those in our Association who are not 
attending Sunday School, many who are Baptists by preference. 

An associational training school would be a power for good in im- 
proving our Sunday Schools and our churches. When we improve 
our Sunday Schools, we promote the influence and work of our church 
membership. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ADRIAN J. NEWTON. 

Dr. M. L. Kesler, Chairman of the committee hereto- 
fore appointed to recommend to the body an Every Mem- 
ber Canvass Promotion Committee, recommended the fol- 
lowing persons: 

Rev. J. M. Hayes, Chairman Lexington, N. C. 

R. D. Covington Thomasville, N. C. 

D. S. Hay worth High Point, N. C. 

Rev. E. F. Mumford Wallburg, N. C. 

Rev. M. O. Alexander Thomasville, N. C. 

Miss Sallie McCracken Thomasville, N. C. 

Mrs. D. F. Conrad Lexington, N. C. 

Miss Elizabeth Smith , Linwood, N. C. 

Miss Myra Olive Thomasville, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith Lexington, N. C. 

Albert L. Snider Denton, N. C. 

31. Miss Elizabeth Smith at this time reads the report 
on B. Y. P. U. Work; on motion to adopt, the report is 
discussed by Miss Smith, Rev. Walter Wafford, Rev. J. 
M. Hayes, John A. Sink, Dr- M. L. Kesler, W. G. Fitzger- 
ald, Rev. Richard L. West, Rev. C. R. Johnson, James 

E. Pruitt, Sam J. Smith, and is adopted. 

REPORT ON B. Y. P. U. 

The sixth annual session of the B. Y. P. U. of the Liberty Associa- 
tion was held with Jersey Church on April 12, 1931. 
A very large attendance showed the interest and the encourage- 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 



ment for the young people to go forward and do greater work. There 
were only a few reports by the delegates but each report showed 
better work and more progress. 

The presence of our beloved secretary, Rev. James A. Ivey of 
Raleigh, was an inspiration to hear him tell of the great good the 
pastors, deacons, and superintendents do when they support the 
B. Y. P. U.'s with their presence, encouragement, and help in en- 
listing our young people. It was a treat to listen to the inspiring 
message brought to us by President Coy Muckle, of Wingate, as he 
told of the great need of "Launching Out into the Deep" if we really 
make a success in Christian living. 

New officers were elected for the year and with our fine president, 
Rev. W. L. Warfford, we are hoping and trusting our B. Y. P. U.'s 
shall be enlarged and the extension work be spread throughout the 
Association. 

During the past year, only one new Senior B. Y. P. U. has been or- 
ganized. Of the 26 churches in our Association, there are only 14 
churches which have at least one union functioning. Some have 
two and more. This shows there is much work to be done in more 
than fifty per cent, of our churches. Are we willing to let our young 
people go without the proper training in Christian living? Solomon 
said, "Train up a child in the way he should go." Paul said, "Let no 
man despise thy youth." 

The total enrollment of all the young people in our churches now 
members of B. Y. P. U.'s is approximately 935. Last year's Sunday 
School report showed that there were 840 pupils enrolled in the 
Junior department, 778 in the Intermediate, and 1033 in the Young 
People's department. This should give us a great goal to work for, 
since there are so many young people unenlisted. 

Of all the organizations in the church the B. Y. P. U. is one of the 
most important and most essential to the training and development 
of the young Christians and church members for more efficient ser- 
vice. It trains up workers— not for itelf , but for other lines of church 
work. Usually and frequently when a worker shows signs of efficiency 
in the B. Y. P. U., that one is called on to do a larger sphere of 
church work. Therefore, the B. Y. P. U. trains and transplants. 

Oh, may each and every one realize our opportunity and may all 
work and pray that the time may soon come when every church 
shall maintain a B. Y. P. U„ and the majority of the young people 
are enlisted, trained and utilized. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH SMITH. 



32. Rev. G. A. Martin, pastor of the Denton Church, 



26 MINUTES OP LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



reads and discusses the report on Ministerial Relief. 
The report is adopted by the body. 

REPORT OF THE RELIEF AND ANNUITY BOARD 

It is taken for granted that Southern Baptists have at last 
awakened in a measure to their aged and infirm ministers and 
their widows. So this report will only set forth briefly the work of 
your Board established for that purpose. 

The work of this Board is done through two departments. The 
first, called the Relief department, which receives three and one-hal f 
per cent, of all funds contributed by the churches through their Co- 
operative Program, which the Board distributes bi-monthly according 
to its best judgment. 

In addition to the above amount, it appropriates the interest from 
its Invested Reserve Fund to the same purpose. For the last five 
years the receipts from the churches have steadily diminished until 
they became so meager that the Board was forced last year to draw 
on its Reserve Fund for nearly half the whole amount allocated to its 
beneficiaries, and without this Reserve Fund even the pittances now 
received by our old preachers must have been cut practically in 
half. Our North Carolina ministers have actually received from the 
Board during the current year nearly twice as much as our churches 
have sent in for this purpose. 

The other department of our Board is known as the Service An- 
nuity Department. This began to operate last January in place of 
the old Annuity Department, but still carries out the contracts made 
out unaer the old plan. Under the Relief Department, the bene- 
ficiaries were not required to make any payments and received their 
allotments gratuitously. Under the Service Annuity Plan its bene- 
ficiaries and their churches are required to co-operate. A pastor 
is asKea to contribute two and one -half per cent, of his salary in 
monthly installments, and his church is asked to contribute eight per 
cent, of its regular pastor's salary. By these means together with a 
Contingent Fund provided by the Board it is proposed to accumu- 
late for the participating pastor 65 years of age a minimum of $500.00 
a year or a maximum of around $1,200.00 a year, depending in general 
on the average salary received under 35 years of service. Special 
provision is made in case of disability before reaching 65 years of 
age, and widows are to receive one-half the amount allocated to 
their husbands. 

For particulars of the plan you are urged to write to Mr. Hugh 
P. Lattimer, Asheville, N. O, who is the Board's Eastern represen- 
tative. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 2? 



The Board's regular beneficiaries last year through the South were 
691 ministers, 603 widows, 49 emergency cases and 15 children. Of 
this number, 70 ministers and 59 widows were from North Carolina. 
Participant under the new Annuity Plan, 55 ministers, 45 mission- 
aries and 67 widows. 

Facts About the Relief and Annuity Board 

1. The Board's assets have steadily increased from $106,428.53 in 
1919 to $3,768,574.08 at the close of 1930. 

2. The Board's investment earnings since 1918 have been $1,304,- 
000.00. 

3. The Board's regular operating costs have been paid from its 
investment earnings. During the year just closed cost of operation 
was less than one per cent, earnings on its investments, and its net 
earnings were five and two-tenths per cent. 

4. All net earnings have been used for building up the reserves in 
the Relief and the Annuity Departments from which reserves all 
benefits are paid. 

5. The Board nas paid in benefits during 13 years $1,678,769.68. 
Relief benefits have been $1,422,471.78; annuities $256,297.95. 

6. The Board has paid relief benefits during the year just ended to 
1,493 preachers, missionaries, widows and orphans. 

7. The Board has paid annuities to 174 members of the Annuity 
Fund or to the widows or orphans of deceased members. 

8. The (old) Annuity Fund, now closed to new members, has 1,- 
525 active and retired members. This is inclusive of widows and or- 
phans. This fund, though closed to new members, must pay benefits 
perhaps for 50 years. 

9. Total sum paid in benefits during the past year $198,293.00. Re- 
lief, $129,026.45; Annuities $69,266.55. The above total is the largest 
ever paid in a single year. 

10. All funds, contributed by the churches of the Convention now 
go to the Relief Department to provide stipends for aged and dis- 
abled ministers and missionaries. 

G. A. MARTIN, 

Committee. 

33. In the absence of the chairman of the Committee 
on Nominations, their report is read by Rev. J. M. Hayes. 

In view of the fact that next year is the 100th anni- 
versary of the Association, motion is made and adopted 
that tne Moderator, Clerk and the Program Committee 
for 1932 be allowed to make any changes they see fit in 
the report of this committee and of the Committee on 
Time, Place and Preacher. 



2S MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS 

Associational Director G. W. Miller, Lexington, N. C. 

Orphanage Representative C. M. Wall, Sr.Xexington, N. C. 

TO PREPARE REPORTS FOR NEXT SESSION 

On State of Churches M. O. Alexander 

Home Missions • E. F. Mumford 

Religious Literature B. K. Mason 

Baptist Hospitals G. A. Martin 

State Missions E. F. Mumford 

B. Y. P. U Walter Wafford 

Christian Education C. R. Johnsen 

Foreign Missions Miss Roxie Sheets 

Ministerial Relief Archibald Johnson 

W. M. U Miss Sallie McCracken 

Sunday Schools R. D. Covington 

Orphanage P. V. Critcher 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement M. L. Kesler 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE FOR 1932 

M. L. Kesler Thomasville, N. C. 

D. S. Hayworth High Point, N. C, Rt. No. 4 

G. W. Miller Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith Lexington, N. C. 

Albert L. Snider Denton, N. C. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. M. Hayes, Chairman Lexington, N. C. 

C. C. Wrenn Southmont, N. C. 

L. E. Teague Thomasville, N. C. 

D. S. Hayworth High Point, N. C. 

A. L. Snider Denton, N. C. 

W. H. Lomax Linwood, N. C. 

COMMITTEE ON DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS FOR 1932 

John Arch McMillan Thomasville, N. C. 

Walter Wafford Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith Lexington, N. C. 

34- Dr. M. L. Kesler, Chairman of the committee ap- 
pointed last year to recommend to the Association this 
year plans for celebrating our 100th anniversary next 
year, reports the recommendations of the committee, 
which are adopted. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO ARRANGE CENTENNIAL EX- 
ERCISES FOR THE ASSOCIATION IN 1932 

Your committee beg leave to report: 

First, we suggest that in order to avoid adding an extra day to 
the meeting of the Association the program be arranged so that the 
principal Centennial exercises take the place of the introductory 
sermon, and, if further time be needed, use a night session. 

We further recommend that a brief historical sketch of the Asso- 
ciation be prepared, and that C. M. Wall and Sam J. Smith be ap- 
pointed to prepare this sketch. 

And further, that a suitable person be selected to deliver an appro- 
priate address for the occasion. 

From the nature of such program, it would seem necessary to con- 
tinue this present committee, or appoint another in order to assure 
the proper working out of this arrangement. 

Respectfully submitted, 
M. L. KESLER, for Committee. 

DATE OF CLOSING ASSOCIATIONAL YEAR 
CHANGED 

35. In order that the committee on the Digest of 
Church Letters might have their report ready for the 
first day of the Association in the future, Rev. Walter 
WafFord, of Lexington, makes motion that our Associa- 
tional year close with the last Sunday in August each 
year , and that immediately after this date the different 
church clerks prepare their letters and mail them to the 
Clerk of the Association. 

The motion is adopted. 

36. R. D. Covington reads the report of the Finance 
Committee, which is adopted. 

REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 

We are not making any suggestion as to what each church shall 
give for the Co-operative Program because we hope every church 
v/ill join heartily in the Every Member Canvass in November. This 
is a Biblical plan and we commend it to our churches. Let every 
church at the same time have this thorough Every Member Canvass. 
We believe God will bless us in this effort if we go at it prayerfully 
and earnestly. 

For the Minute Fund, printing etc., we recommend that each 
church pay not less than three cents per member. This, by all means, 
should be sent to the Association and turned over to the Finance 



30 MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Committee or Associational Treasurer. Last year a majority of the 
churches were liberal in regard to this fund, but several churches 
paid very little or nothing. For this reason, the Treasurer is now 
carrying a deficit. 

L. E. TEAGUE, 
L. E f HEPLER, 
R. D. COVINGTON, 

Finance Committee. 

37- Rev. E. F. Mumford reads the report on Me- 
morials, which is adopted. 

(See Memorial Page for Names) 

38. Rev. Richard L. West offers the following resolu- 
tion, which is adopted. 

RESOLUTION OF THANKS 

Resolved: That we hereby extend to the pastor and members of 
Denton Church and the people of this community our sincere thanks 
and gratitude for their gracious entertainment and hospitality during 
the sessions of the Association. 

And that we also thank them for the use of their church and 
equipment for the present session. 

RICHARD L. WEST. 

39. Prayer by Rev. C. A. Upchurch. 
The Association adjourns at 4:45 P. M. 

G. WILSON MILLER, Moderator, 

SAM J. SMITH, Clerk. 



IN REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE, WHO HAVE ANSWERED 
THE ROLL CALL SINCE OUR LAST ASSOCIATION 



"In My Father's House are Many Mansions." 



ABBOTTS CREEK: 

Mrs. Florena Payne 
.. Mrs. E. F. Mumford 

CENTER HILL: 
C. R. Hunt, Deacon 
Mrs. Benjamin Saintsing 

CHURCHLAND: 
Mrs. Lilie Rickard Smith 
Mrs. R. K. Williams 

DENTON: 
Mr. N. Conrad Feezor 
Mrs. R. W. T. Bean 

HOLLOW AYS: 
Mrs. J. M. Prim 
Mrs. Mary A. McCarn 
Mrs. Rebecca Shaw 
Mrs. Effie Owen 
Mrs. Sarah Collins 
Mr. H. F. Palmer 
Mrs. Sarah E. Wafford 

JERSEY: 
Miss Franke Palmer 
Mr. R. J. Tate 
Mr. L. A. Smith 

LEXINGTON: 
Miss Sadie Yarborough 
Mr. W. C. Grubb 
Mr. T. L. Henderson, Sr. 

LIBERTY: 
Mr. David Grubb 
Mrs. Charlotte Pierce 



MILLS HOME: 
Mr. Samuel Thompson 
Miss Maggie Woods 
Mrs. L. E. Peace 

NEW FRIENDSHIP: 
Mr. Branson F. Charles 
Mr. Franklin Z. Wilson 
Mrs. Charlie Mendenhall 1 
Mrs. Anthony Fishel 

REEDS: 
Mr. Rural Michael 

RICH FORK: 
Mrs. Mary Jane Eddinger 

SMITH GROVE: 
Mrs. Mollie Koonts 
Mrs. Roxie Lomax 

SUMMER VILLE: 
Mrs. Eliza J. Ingram 

TABERNACLE: 
Mrs. C. L. Meyers 
Mr. W. H. Brown 
Mr. J. T. McDonald 
Mr. R. F. Styles 
Mrs. Maggie Johnson 

TAYLORS GROVE: 
Mrs. Lou Brewer 

THOMAS VILLE: 
Mrs. John L. Everhart 
Mrs. E. L. Hepler 
Mr. W. B. Baird 



E. F. MUMFORD, Chairman Committee 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 



PASTORS OF THE ASSOCIATION 
Name Church Member of 

Alexander, M. O Thomasville 

Bradley, Earl L Smith Grove 

Dix, O. P Gravel Hill 

Ferguson, Ira D Wallburg 

Hanes, J. H ! Westfield 

Hayes, J. M Lexington 

Honeycutt, R. N Jersey 

Johnson, C. R Tabernacle 

Mason, B. K New Friendship 

Martin, G. A Denton 

McMillan, John Arch Mills Home 

Mumford, E. F Abbotts Creek 

Morris, D. P Summerville 

Penry, H. T Stoners Grove 

Roach, E. C Welcome 

Turner, E. W Reeds 

Warlord, Walter L Sheets Memorial 

West, Richard L Southside 

Wilson, S, B Lick Creek 

ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE 
ASSOCIATION WHO ARE NOT PASTORS, AND THE 
CHURCHES THEY BELONG TO 

Bishop, S. (Retired) Tabernacle 

Caldwell, M. R. N. (Inactive) Taylors Grove 

Gallimore, Arthur (Missionary to China) Lexington 

Kesler, Dr. M. L. (Supt. Mills Home) Thomasville 

Newton, J. D. (Inactive) Thomasville 

Shinn, Dr. J. L. (Retired) Denton 

ASSISTANT PASTORS AND EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 
Warlord, Walter L., Asst. Pastor Lexington Church. 
No church in the Association has an educational director. 

B. Y. P. U. 
ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 
President— Rev. Walter L. Warlord, Lexington, N. C. 
Secretary — Miss Sudie Bell Palmer, Linwood, N. C. 
Vice-President (Lexington Group)— Miss Elizabeth Smith, Lin- 
wood, N. C. 

Vice-President (Denton Group) — Grover Palmer, High Rock, N. C. 
Vice-President (Thomasville Group) — Miss Mozell Clinard, Thom- 
asville, N. C. 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Chorister — L. W. Hansel, Thomasville, N. C. 

Pianist — Mrs. Mattie Henderson Morgan, Lexington, N. C. 
PRESIDENTS, LEADERS AND DIRECTORS 
ABBOTTS CREEK: 

Carrick Teague (A), High Point, N. C, R. 4, President. 
CAROLINA AVENUE: 

Loyd Black (S), Thomasville, N. C, President. 

W. H. Beusee (J), Thomasville, N. C, President. 
CENTER HILL: 

Holt Brown (S), Lexington, N. C, R. 5, President. 
CHURCHLAND: 

J. Lee Wilson (S), Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1, President. 

O. G. Richard (I), Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5, Leader. 
DENTON: 

Thelma Russell (S), Denton, N. O, President. 
Hazel Russell (I), Denton, N. C, Rt. 1, Leader. 
Mrs. W. H. Snider (J), High Rock, N. C, Rt. 1, Leader. 
JERSEY: 

Claude Smith (S), Linwood, N. O, President. 
LEXINGTON: 

Miss Esther Hutchins, Lexington, N. O, Director. 

Ed. F. Smith (A), Lexington, N. O, President. 

Miss Hilda Williams (S), Lexington, N. C, President. 

Sam J. Smith (I), Lexington, N. O, Leader. 

Miss Violet Cross (J), Lexington, N. O, Leader. 
MILLS HOME: 

J. A. McMillan, Thomasville, N. O, Director. 

Young Howard (S), Thomasville, N. C, President. 

Hailie Covington (S), Thomasville, N. C, President. 

Minnie Gray Lester (S), Thomasville, N. C, President. 

Bertha Biland (I), Thomasville, N. C, Leader. 

Arbutus McManus (I), Thomasville, N. O, Leader. 

Mary Scarbrough (I), Thomasville, N. O, Leader. 

Alyce Rudd (J) , Thomasville, N. O, Leader. 

Ethel Johnson (J), Thomasville, N. C, Leader. 

Rebecca Allen (J), Thomasville, N. C, Leader. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: 

Mrs. George Nading (S), Winston-Salem, N. C, President. 

Miss Ola Crowder (I), Winston-Salem, N. O, Rt. 5, Leader. 

Mrs. Allen Jones (J), Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 6, Leader. 
REEDS: 

Horace Myers (S) , Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5, President. 
Mrs. G. F. Koonts (I), Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3, Leader, 
Miss Arlene Leonard (J), Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3, Leader. 



24 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



RICH FORK: 

Clyde Eddinger (S), Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1, President. ' 
SMITH GROVE: 
Mrs. Clara Broadway (I), Salisbury, N. C, Care of N. C. Fin. Co, 
Leader. 

Miss Ruth Snider (J), Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1, Leader. 
SOUTHSIDE: 

Frank Ware, Thomasville, N. C, Director. 

Frank Ware (S) Thomasville, N. C, President. 

Sadie Hoyle (J; , Thomasville, N. C, Leader. 
SUMMER VILLE : 

Sam Buie (S), Denton, N. C, President. 
TABERNACLE: 

Elmer Pruitt (S), Erlanger, N. C, Box 185, President. 
THOMASVILLE: 

Talbert I. Stroud, Thomasville, N. C, Director. 

Miss Blanche Gant (S), Thomasville, N. C, President. 

L. E. Teague (I), Thomasville, N. C, Leader. 

Mrs. C. M. Howell (J) , Thomasville, N. C, Leader. 

W. M. U. 
ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 
Superintendent — Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 
Associate Supt. — Mrs. R. S. Greene, Thomasville, N. C. 
Secretary and Treas. — Miss Esther Newton, Thomasville, N. C. 
Junior Supt. — Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Lexington, N. C. 
Personal Service Chairman — Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Thomasville, 
N. C. 

Mission Study Chairman — Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, 
N. C, Rt. 4. 

OFFICERS WOMEN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



Presidents and Addresses Church 

Mrs. Perry Hayworth, Kernersville, N. C Abbotts Creek 

Mrs. R. L. West, Thomasville, N. C Carolina Avenue 

Mrs. W. A. Hannah, Linwood, N. C, R 1, Churchland 

Mrs. H. L. Miller, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 2 Center Hill 

Mrs. C. E. Clyatt, Denton, N. C Denton 

Mrs. W. H. Johnson, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 Holloways 

Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Linwood, N. C Jersey 

Mrs. G. S. Hartzog, Lexington, N. C Lexington 

Miss Annie Hall, Thomasville, N. C Mills Home 

Mrs. Wm. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 New Friendship 

Mrs. Alda Craver, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 Reeds 

Mrs. Minnie Eddinger, Thomasville, N. 0., Rt. 1 Rich Fork 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



36 



Miss Mattie Bean, Lexington, N. C, R6 Sheets Memorial 

Mrs. E. R. Lanning, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 Smith Grove 

Mrs. W. L. Goodin, Thomasville, N. C Southside 

Mrs. L. E. Lockabill, Southmont, N. C Stoners Grove 

Mrs. R. K. Smith, Erlanger, N. C Tabernacle 

Mrs. M. O. Alexander, Thomasville, N. C Thomasville 

Miss Etta Teague, Wallburg, N. C Wallburg 



Y. W. A. COUNSELLORS 
DENTON: Miss Hazel Russell, Denton, N. C. 
HOLLO WAYS: Miss Tela Beanblossom, High Rock, N. C. 
LEXINGTON: Mrs. J. M. Hayes, Lexington, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: Mrs. Farris Swaim, 1904 Waughtown St., 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE: Miss Lois Johnson, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG: Miss Clara Wall, Wallburg, N. C. 
STONERS GROVE: Mrs. A. F. Watford, Linwood, N. C. 

G. A. LEADERS 
CHURCHLAND: Treva Barnes, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 
HOLLO WAYS: Miss Elva Crook, High Rock, N. C, Rt. 1. 
LEXINGTON: Miss Agnes Carrick, Lexington, N. C. 
MILLS HOME: Mrs. R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENRSHIP: Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C, 
SMITH GROVE: Mrs. Alma Lassiter, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 
THOMASVILLE: Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C. 

Mrs. C. F. Lambeth, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG: Mrs. J. W. Tuttle, Wallburg, N. C. 

R. A. LEADERS 
CHURCHLAND: Miss Louise Barnes, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 
LEXINGTON: Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Lexington, N. C. 
MILLS HOME: Maggie Scarbrough, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: Alfred Hartman, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4. 
SMITH GROVE: Mrs. Mary Owen, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1. 
THOMASVILLE: Mrs. Wade Hilliard, Thomasville, N. C. 

Mrs. A. Z. Boles, Thomasville, N. C. 
WALLBURG: Mrs. A. C. Fowler, Wallburg, N. C. 

SUNBEAM LEADERS 
LEXINGTON: Mrs. Emery Lanning, Lexington, N. C. 
MILLS HOME: Miss Mary Cook, Thomasville, N. C. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: Mrs. Paul Atkins, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
i REEDS: Miss Isabel Sink, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3. 
!i RICH FORK: Mrs. Ruth Conrad, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1. 
STONERS GROVE: Mrs. Fred Long, Southmont, N. C. 
THOMASVILLE: Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C. 
I WALLBURG: Mrs. J. W. King, Wallburg, N. C. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist As- 
sociation." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this association to furnish the 
gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the asso- 
ciation, and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP v 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the asso- 
ciation, pastors of the churches in the association, and messengers 
from the churches. Each church shall be entitled to three messengers 
and one additional messenger for every 50 members or fraction there- 
of over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, 
vice-moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected 
each year by the association at its annual meeting and shall hold 
office until their successors are elected. The duties of the officers 
shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in like organiza- 
tions, or as defined by the association from time to time. 

BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee 
each year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel 
preached in all parts of the association, and to attend to all business 
of the association between the sessions and to make such reports as 
they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the association. The 
3C MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

association may appoint or elect such other boards or committees 
from time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The association shall meet annually, on Tuesday after 
the first Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request 
of the Executive Committee change the time or the place of meeting 
of this association when it may be deemed by him not expedient to 
meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive Com- 
mittee may fill any vacancy occurring between meetings of the asso- 
ciation. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular ses- 
sion of the association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules of 
Order for Parliamentary Authority. 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



WHERE HELD 



PREACHER 



MODERATOR 



CLERK 



| Uamestown 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
Jersey 
Lick Crek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting H 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 

3Big Creek 

Uamestown 
Liberty 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creeek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Hel( 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3Big Creek 
2Pine Meeting H. 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H. 

Summerville 

Lexington 

Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H. 

High Point 

Kernersville 

Holloways 

Pleasant Grove 

Denton 
5Piney Grove 

Rich Fork 

Abbotts Creek 

Reeds X Roads 



Geo. W. Purefoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Caroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Eli Carroll 
Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 
Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
No account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stokes 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wingate 
H. Morton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. F. Redd 
C. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H. Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 
J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J. K. Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
|R. Vandeventer 
|J. H. Hilliard 
iHenry Sheets 
|W. H. Rich 
|J. H. Lambert 
|S. B. Wilson 
|W. H. Rich 



|Wm. Burch 
lEli Carroll 
|Eli Carroll 
[Eli Carroll 
lEli Carroll 
lEli Carroll 
lEli Carroll 
lEli Carroll 
lEli Carroll 
iGershom Tuessey 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IWm. Turner 
IWm. Turner 
IBenjamin Lanier 
Uoseph Spurgeon 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
lAmos Weaver 
I Am os Weaver 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IJ. B. Jackson 
|J. B. Jackson 
|J. B. Jackson 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IConditions caused 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IBenjamin Lanier 
IWm. Turner 
IWm. Turner 
IWm. Turner 
U. H. Brooks 
IH. Morton 
IWm. Turner 
IWm. Turner 
IWm. Turner 
IWm. Turner 
IH. W. Reinhart 
|H. W. Reinhart 
IH. W. Reinhart 
IH. W. Reinhart 
|H. W. Reinhart 
|H. W. Reinhart 
|Wm. Turner 
IWm. Turner 
IWm. Turner 
IWm. Turner 
| James Smith 
(James Smith 
Uames Smith 
Uames Smith 
Uames Smith 
iJames Smith 
iJames Smith 
IJames Smith 
IJames Smith 
IJames Smith 
IJames Smith 
IJames Smith 
IJames Smith 



IPeter Owen 
IPeter Owen 
IPeter Owen 
IPeter Owen 
IPeter Owen 
IPeter Owen 
IPeter Owen 
IPeter Owen 
IPeter Owen 
IPeter Owen 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
jAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
|J. H. Owen 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
lAzariah Williams 
| by Civil War 
|J. H. Owen 
|J. H. Owen 
|J. H. Owen 
|J. H. Owen 
|J. H. Owen 
IJ. H. Owen 
IJ. L. Pleasant 
IThomas Carrick 
| Thomas Carrick 
IThomas Carrick 
IThomas Carrick 
IHenry Sheets 
iHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Yeai 



WHERE HELD 



PREACHER 



MODERATOR 



CLERK 



1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
190G 
1907 
19 08 
19109 
19,10 
1911 
11912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
19 20 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
19 26 
19 27 
$928 
1929 
1930 
19'31 



Lexington 
Lick Creek 
Jersey 
2Pine Meeting- H 
New Friendship 
Thomasville 
Wallburg 
Denton 
Liberty 
Orphanage 
Abbotts Creek 
Stoners Grove 
Rich Fork 
Holloways 
Center Hill 
Wallburg 
Smith Grove 
Lexington 
Denton 

New Friendship 
Churchland 
Slummerville 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds 
Liberty 
Rich Fork 
Thomasville 
Holloways 
Stoners Grove 
Abbotts Creek 
Denton 



IC A. G. Thomas 
iHenry Sheets 
IW. A. Smith 
IGeo. P. Harrill 
Uohn R. Miller 
IJ. S. Farmer 
iDr. R. T. Vann 
|M. L. Kesler 
IS. D. Swain 
IG. A. Keller 
IG. A. Martin 
IO. A. Keller 
IM. L. Kesler 

IG. A. Martin 
IO. A. Keller 
jl. M. Mercer 
IFred D. Hale 
IM. L, Kesler 
IR. E. White 
|J. S. Hardaway 
IM. L, Kesler 
IW A. Hough 
IW. L. Barrs 
IC. H. Trueblood 
IC. A. Owens 
IE. N. Gardner 

IH. T. Penry 
IM. L. Kesler 
J. M. Hayes 

IM. L, Kesler 
!M. O. Alxeander 



Uames Smith 
I James Smith 
Uames Smith 
Uames Smith 
Uames Smith 
Uames Smith 
U. W. Nowell 
U. W. Nowell 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IG. A. Martin 
IO. A. Keller 
IO. A. Keller 
IR. S. Green 
IR. S. Green 
IR. S. Green 
IR. S. Green 
IR. S. Green 
IR. S. Green 
I Archibald Johnson 
(Archibald Johnson 
(Archibald Johnson 
lArchibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
IG. Wilson Miller 



IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IP S. Vann 
IP. S. Vann 
IP. S. Vann 
IP. S. Vann 
IP. S. Vann 
IP. S. Vann 
IP. S. Vann 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
IHenry Sheets 
lArchibald Johnson 
lArchibald Johnson 
lArchibald Johnson 
lArchibald Johnson 
IPaul C. Newton 
IPaul C. Newton 
iSam J. Smith 
iSam J. Smith 
ISam J. Smith 
ISam J. Smith 
ISam J. Smith 
ISam J. Smith 
ISam J. Smith 
ISam J. Smith 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Elorado- 
4 Now Clemmonsville; 5 Now WallburgV ^ loiaao ' 



PROCEEDINGS 

of the 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
of the 

LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

The Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Asso- 
ciation held its twenty-fifth annual session with the so- 
ciety of the Smith Grove Church on Wednesday, April 29, 
1931. The meeting was called to order by the Super- 
intendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken, at ten o'clock. The 
opening hymn, "Come, Thou Almighty King," was sung, 
after which Rev. Mr. Earl Bradley led in prayer. The 
Associational watchword was then repeated in unison. 
The devotional was conducted by Mrs. L. A. Martin, who 
used Psalm 121. An inspiring vocal solo, "If Jesus Goes 
With Me, I'll Go," was rendered by Mrs. J. M. Hayes, of 
Lexington. A hearty welcome was given by Miss Biddie 
Snyder. To this Mrs. C. B. Wall, of Hollo ways, re- 
spond. 

Reports of officers were given as follows : 
Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, the Personal Service Chairman, 
gave her report, which showed a large number of ser- 
vices of various kinds rendered by most of the organiza- 
tions. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



RECEIPT'S : 

Balance in treasury Jan 1, 1930 

Contributed for assistant to H. H. McMillan 
Received for associational expenses 



$ 30.97 
47.09 
30.20 



Total 



$108.26 



DISBURSEMENTS: 

Check to Miss Lazenby, assistant to Mr. McMillan 

Miss Sallie L. McCracken, traveling expenses 

Miss Lazenby for expenses Charlotte Div 

R. D. Covington, Treas., for W. M. U. programs. . 

Miss Sallie McCracken for postage 

Miss Pearle Johnson for W. M. U. trip 



$ 47.09 



20.00 
5.00 
2.50 
5.00 
7.00 



Total 

Balance December 31, 1930 



$ 86.59 
$ 21.67 



40 MINUTES OP LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



The report of the Mission Study Chairman, Mrs. W. 
J. Griffin, showed that Mission Study work had been done 
in a number of societies and that 256 seals were given. 

Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Young People's Leader, reported. 

Our Superintendent, Miss Sallie McCracken, reminded 
us that this was the 25th anniversary of our organiza- 
tion. 

The roll call of societies was then taken up and most all 
of the societies in the Association responded, telling 
something of the work done in their society during the 
past year. 

The Superintendent, Miss McCracken, then gave her 
annual address. She had chosen for her subject, "Our 
Inheritance." She spoke of the sacrificial lives of many 
great men, and especially the sacrificial life and death of 
our Lord. She reminded of the importance of our re- 
membering the responsibility of the great inheritnace 
that had come to us. 

The Associate Superintendent, Mrs. R. S. Green, ex- 
plained the Heck Memorial Fund, and gave a sketch of 
Miss Heck's life and her labors for Missions. 

Mrs. C. M. Howell brought our Baptist Mission per- 
iodicals before the Association with a most appropriate 
poster representing each publication. 

Miss McCracken introduced Mrs. W. N. Jones, our 
State W. M. U. President, who brought an inspiring 
message. Mrs. Jones' address was based on two Scrip- 
ture verses, "He hath made everything beautiful in its 
time," and "Behold, I make all things new." She gave 
a brief review of the past year's work, and urged that 
we all become truly "Laborers together with God." 

The Superintendent announced the committees, and the 
Association then adjourned for dinner. 

Afternoon Session 

After reassembling, the hymn "Joy to the World" was 
sung by the congregation. The devotional was conducted 
by Mrs. Alda Craver, who used a portion of 1 John: 4. 
She stressed the great love of God toward us. Prayer 



MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 41 



was offered by Mrs. E. W. Turner. The missionary 
training of our young people was ably discussed by Mrs. 
W. N. Jones. 

A playlet, "Love Provides," was given by the G. A.'s 
of Smith Grove. This showed the good work done for 
missionaries' children by the provision of the Margaret 
Fund. 

A short conference period was held during which the 
Superintendent told of the needed contribution to provide 
for passage of Miss Pearl Johnson to her beloved work 
in China. Each society was asked to take an offering 
for this good cause. 

A paper on the W. M. U. Training School, which had 
been prepared by a former student, Miss Grace Francis, 
was read by Miss Roxie Sheets. 

The reports of the committees were given as follows : 

NOMINATIONS 

Superintendent— Miss Sailie L. McCracken, Thomasville. 

Assistant Superintendent— Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville. 

Secretary-Treasurer— Miss Esther Newton, Thomasville. 
Junior Superintendent— Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Lexington. 
Mission Study Leader— Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem. 

Personal Service Chairman— Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Thomasville, 
Route 4. 

The nominating committee was composed of Mrs. L. A. Martin, 
Mrs. B„ R. Cross, Mrs. W. A. Shoaf, Mrs. E. R. Lanning, Mrs. L. W. 
Hansell. 

TIME AND PLACE 

This committee was composed of Mrs. C. M. Howell, Mrs. Mary P. 
Yarcorough, Mrs. N. G. Goodin. They decided on the Mills Home 
Church and Thursday after the third Sunday in April as the time 
for the 1932 meeting. 

REPORT OF COURTESY COMMITTEE 

The courtesy committee, which was composed of Mrs. B. F. Lee, 
Mrs. W. L. Bowman, and Mrs. L. A. Carswell, reported as follows: 

We, the members of the Liberty Associational W. M. U., wish to 
extend our thanks and appreciation to the pastor and members of 
Smith Grove Church for their kindness and hospitality in the enter- 
tainment of this meeting, also we wish to express our appreciation 
for the delicious and bountiful luncheon provided, and for the 



42 MINUTES OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



beautiful flowers in the church, and all that they have done for our 
pleasure and comfort. 

Also we wish to extend our thanks to Mrs. W. N. Jones, who 
brought us help and inspiration as she unfolded plans and recounted 
past experiences and inspired us to higher endeavor. 

We are grateful also to our Superintendent, who gave us her mes- 
sage of past history and urged us to hold up the torch which has 
been handed down to us. 

We want to express our hearty appreciation to everyone who has 
taken part in making the day another milestone in missionary 
progress. 

OBITUARY 

We, the committee on obituaries, submit the following names of 
three faithful members of the W. M. U. of the Liberty Association, 
who have gone to their reward during the past year: Mrs. Mollie 
Koontz, of Smith Grove; Mrs. R. K. Williams, of Churchland; and 
Mrs. Lillie Rickard, of Churchland. "Blessed are the dead which 
die in the Lord from henceforth: yea, saith the Spirit, that thev 
may rest from their labors; and their works do follow them." 

Respectfully submitted, 

MISS ANNIE HALL, 
MRS. ALDA CRAVER, 
MRS. W. A. BEEKER. 

A most impressive and inspiring closing devotional 
was conducted by Rev. M. O. Alexander, who used the 
theme of Prayer. It was a fitting close to a profitable 
session, which was adjourned by a prayer led by Rev. 
C. R, Johnson. 

ESTHER NEWTON, Secretary. 



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TABLE VI. B. Y. P. U.'S OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 
SEPTEMBER 8, 1931 



CHURCHES 



o 



Abbotts Creek . . 
Carolina Avenue 
Center Hill 

Churchland 

Denton 

Jersey 

Lexington 

Mills Home 
New Friendship 

Reeds 

Rich Fork 

Smith Grove . . . 
Southside ..... . 

Summerville 

Tabernacle 

Thomasville . . . . 



1 






1 




14 






1 




l 


2 




3.6 




12 


1 






1 




14 






1 


1 




2 




30 


18 




1 


1 


' ' i 


3 




16 


18 


' '8 


1 




l 


2 




22, 




23 


1 


' 'i 


] 


4 


'27 


18 


'23 


10 


3 


3 




'9: 




52 


■55 


62 


1 


1 


1 


3 




24 


18 


20 


1 


1 


i 


3 




15 


20 


40 


1 






1 




25 






1 


l 


2 




24 


18 


1 


i 


2 




20 


20 




' i 




1 






'45 




1 






1 




'28 






1 


l 


l 


3 




40 


33 


43 


16 


li 


12 


40 


*27 


354|254 


256 



14 

48 
14 
48 
42 
45 
78 
169' 
62 
76 
26 
42 
40 
45 
28 
116 
891 



7 
30 
10 

12 
10' 
11 

21 
52 
26i 
23 

*2ii 
28 

'i.8 
51 
320 



14 
47 

169 
30 
42 
25 
16 
40 
1( 
16 
30 

522' 



TABLE VII. WOMAN'S WORK OF LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIA- 
TION. SEPTEMBER 8, 1931 















60 














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O 


03 
U 


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CHURCHES 


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ies 


, W. A.'s 


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£ 


S. Mem 


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a 


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Members 
ed 


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tnary Co 




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.'3 




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JO 

fl 


32 


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6 


6 


6 















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or 




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% 




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03 


HH 




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1 


14 










14 














1 


12 


... 








12 




Center Hill 












1 


14 










14 










l 


1 




3 


12 




23 


16 




50 




Denton 




" i 








2 


11 


*14 








261 


'ii 


Holloways 




1 


l 






3 


20 


12 


8 






40 


33 












1 


19 








19 




4 


1 


l 


1 


1 


8 


107 


30 


12. 




18 


175 


*80 








2 


3 


1 J 


7 


20 


74 


94 


120 


308 


50 


New Friendship . . 




' i 


1 


1 


1 


5 


24 


*ii2 


20 


7 


28 


91 


26 


Reeds 










1 


2 


12 








16 


27! 




Rich Fork 










1 


2 


10 








26 


36 




Sheets Memorial . . 






. . . I . . . 




1 


14 








14 








1 






3 


24 




13 


14 




51 
















' 1 


14 










m 




Stoners Grove .... 




1 






1 


3 


14 


9 






12 


35 


*23 










1 


35 








35 


20 


Thomasville 




1 


2, 


V 


1 


6 


152 


18 


40 


16 


46 


171 


61 






1 


1 


1 


li 


6 


22 


16 


121 


1*2 


10 


721 


8 




22 


7 


10 


9 


8 


56 


460 


111 


202. 


166 


274' 


1,203 


319 



For gifts by W. M. U. in the Association see tables No. 4 and 5 




Meredith College Library 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



? 



LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 



ONE HUNDREDTH ANNUAL SESSION 
Held with 

LEXINGTON FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
Lexington, North Carolina 
September 6-7, 1932 



The Next Session will be Held Tuesday and Wednesday 
After the First Sunday in September, 1933, 
with the Lick Creek Church, 
High Rock, N. C. 




LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 



ONE HUNDREDTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Held with 

LEXINGTON FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Lexington, North Carolina 
September 6-7, 1932 



The Next Session will be Held Tuesday and Wednesday 
After the First Sunday in September, 1933, 
with the Lick Creek Church, 
High Rock, N. C. 



North Carolina 




Associational Year Ends the Last Sunday in August. 



INDEX 

Page 

Appointment of Committees 14 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 58 

Auxiliaries — Associational 5 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 6 

Business, Order of 10 

Church Clerks 65 

Church Treasurers 66 

Churches and Messengers • 7 

Committees: Executive 5 

Finance 14 

On Nominations 15 

Program for 1933 19 

To Report 1933, Chairman 5 

On Time, Place and Preacher 15 

Promotion Every Member Canvass 19 

Standing 5 

Constitution and By-Laws 52 

Deceased Members 51 

Denominational Program 39 

Directories: Associational 5 

Church 58 

B. Y. P. U 58 

Ordained Ministers 58 

W. M. S 60 

Gavel Presented Body 9 

Historical Table 53 

Kesler, Dr. M. L 45 

Officers, Associational 5 

Organization 9 

Orphanage Representative 18 

Pastors of Association 58 

Pastors, New 8 

Pine Knot Mission 48 

Proceedings, Associational 9 

Proceedings of W. M. U. Annual Meeting 55 

Reports: Biblical Recorder, Religious Literature 11 

B. Y. P. U.. . , 42 

Committee on Nominations 19 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 48 

Committee on State of Churches 41 

Centennial 20 

Education ' 42 

Foreign Missions 13 

Hospitals 15 

Home Missions 10 

Ministerial Relief 44 

Orphanage 18 

State Missions 16 

Sunday Schools 17 

Treasurer 48 

Woman's Work 12 

Executive Committee 39 

Resolution of Thanks 47 

Statistical Tables 63 

Sermon, Annual 20 

Spring Session 48 

Sunday School Superintendents 64 

Visitors 8 

W. M. U. Auxiliaries and Officers 61 



DIRECTORIES 



OFFICERS 

G. Wilson Miller, Moderator Lexington, N. C. 

E. F. Mumford, Vice-Moderator Wallburg, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Clerk Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Treasurer Lexington, N. C. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
J. M. Hayes, Chairman Lexington, N. C. 

C. C. Wrenn Southmont, N. C. 

L. E. Teague •• Thomas ville, N. C. 

D. S. Hay worth Rt. 4, High Point, N. C. 

A. L. Snider Denton, N. C. 

R. D. Covington Thomasville, N. C. 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES TO REPORT IN 1933 
Baptist Hospitals J. A. McMillan, Thomasville, N. C. 

B. Y. P. U.'s Gilmer Cross, Lexington, N. C. 

Christian Education Earl L. Bradley, Spencer, N. C. 

Foreign Missions Mrs. D. F. Conrad, Lexington, N. C. 

Home Missions Walter Wafford, Lexington, N. C. 

Ministerial Relief H. T. Penry, Southmont, N. C. 

Orphanage Miss Mary Misenheimer, Lexington, N. C. 

Public Morals, Law Enforcement P. V. Critcher, Lexington, N. C. 

Religious Literature B. K. Mason, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

State of Churches J. M. Hayes, Lexington, N. C. 

State Missions Conrad Motsinger, Wallburg, N. C. 

Sunday Schools A. J. Newton, Lexington, N. C. 

W. M. U Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 
B. Y. P. U. 

Meeting was held with the church at Lexington, N. C, August 26, 
1932. 

President — Rev. Walter Wafford, Lexington, N. C. 
Secretary— Miss Sarah Ann Martin, Denton, N. C. 

W. M. U. 

Meeting was held with the church at Mills Home on April 27, 1932. 
Superintendent — Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 
Associate Superintendent — Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 



6 



MINUTES OF THE 



Secretary Treasurer— Mrs. M. M. Smith, Rt. 4, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Junior Supt. — Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Lexington, N. C. 

Personal Service Chrm. — Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Thomasville, N. C. 

Mission Study Chrm.— Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Rt. 4, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 
Have no associational Sunday School Convention. 

BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS LOCATED IN ASSOCIATION 
The Mills Home— Established 1885 

General Manager — Hon. I. G. Greer, Thomasville, N. C. 
Treasurer — R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. C. 

Trustees: 

B. W. Spillman, Kinston, N. C, Chairman. 
Thomas Carrick, High Point, N. C, Secretary. 

Term expiring: 

1932— 1. G. Greer, Boone; H. S. Stokes, Winston-Salem; Mrs. 
Bryon C. Scott, Charlotte; R. C. Lawrence, Lumberton; Dr. Glenn 
Choate, Salisbury. 

1933— T. B. Wheeler, Scotland Neck; J. W. Noell, Roxboro; Thos. 
Carrick, High Point; J. B. Stroud, Greensboro; A. E. Tate, High Point. 

1934— W. A. Cooper, Raleigh; J. H. Canady, Kinston; L. L. Lcary, 
Morehead City; R. L. Moore, Mars Hill. 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY, STANDING COMMITTEES, 
REPRESENTATIVES, AUXILIARY MEETINGS, ETC. 

Associational missionary or other paid employee — None. 

Standing committees — None. 

Representative of laymen's movement— None. 

The auxiliary meetings— The Association has no W. M. U. Aux- 
liary, Sunday School Convention, B. Y. P. U. Convention, which 
meets at the same time or during the sessions of the Association. 

Have no laymen's movement. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



LIST OF MESSENGERS 1932 SESSIONS 

ABBOTTS CREEK— Carrick Teague, D. S. Hay worth, C. H. 
Teague, Minnie Hayworth, Ray Green, Mamie Hayworth, Mrs. M. R. 
Teague, W. D. Spurgeon. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— R. R. Surratt, E. Z. Smith. 

CENTER HILL— H. L. Miller, D. C. Hunt, Ulis Hunt, W. J. Beck, 
J. C. Palmer, Mrs. H. L. Miller. 

CHURCHLAND— S. A. Allred, J. L. McBride, R. K. Williams, 
Robert Grubb, W. H. Lomax, W. H. Beck, Mrs. Odell Walser, D. R. 
Kesler. 

DENTON— R. O. Hedrick, Mrs. R. A. Allen, A. L. Snider, J. J. 
Snider, Julia Plummer, Dr. C. P. Clyatt, Mrs. R. O. Hedrick, Miss 
Vada Garner, Mrs. A. L. Snider, V. K. Skeen, J. W. Davis. 

GRAVEL HILL— Sam Scarlett, E. M. Russell, Frank Smith, W. A. 
Russell, Mrs. Sam Scarlett, Mrs. Frank Smith. 

HOLLOWAYS— D. R. Beanblossom, H. L. Crook, G. C. Palmer,' 
Geo. Workman, Marven Carrick, Columbus Styers, Mrs. B. R. Cross, 
Leora Carrick. 

JERSEY— Mrs. Reid Smith, Miss Elizabeth Smith, J. T. Clark, 
R. L. Palmer, W. L. Smith, W. K. Trexler. 

LEXINGTON— C. W. Trice, J. K. Hankins, A. L. Yarbrough, H. C. 
Myers, Rev. Arthur Gallimore, Mrs. G. S. Hartzog, A. J. Newton, C. 
M. Wall, Sr., Mrs. D. F. Conrad, Miss Roxie Sheets, Gilmer Cross, Otis 
Lanning, Mina Misenheimer, P. V. Critcher, Dwight Pickard, Dr. F. G. 
Johnson, Dr. C. R. Sharoe, Mrs. J. K. Hankins, Mrs. E. G. Hunt, B. C. 
Phillpot, H. L. Leonard. 

LIBERTY— C. O. Hepler, J. R. Watford, H. P. May, Mrs. L. E. 
Hepler, Mrs. H. P. May, W. W. Whitaker, J. W. Myers, C. H. Sowers, 
Miss Lois Hepler, Miss Pauline Watford, J. A. Hepler, Marvin 
Whitaker. 

LICK CREEK— J. A. Kinney, H. C. Keever, C. L. Daniel, J. E. 
Skeen, E. L. Bean, David Kinney. 

MILLS HOME— R. D. Covington, Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Mrs. B. F. 
Cruchfield, Mrs. Maggie Scarbrough, Miss Minerva Rickman, Miss 
Mary Susan Brock, Miss Sallie McCracken. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Rev. J. M. King, Maskey M. Smith, Elmer 
L. Snyder, L. Galven Hartman, Miss Ola Crowder, Miss Florence Mot- 
singer. 

REEDS — I. A. Myers, J. F. Foster, J. H. Thompson, J. C. Leonard, 
J. N. Myers, J. L. Myers. 

RICH FORK— T. H. Small, Willie Bowers, R. S. Everhart, Jake 
Kannoy, Thomas Everhart, Mrs. Sallie Orrender. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Spurgeon Ayers, Mrs. J. J. Carrick, Mrs. 
Dave Smith, B. T. Privette, Will Gallimore, Mrs. J. H. Guffy, Miss 
Mary Swing, J. J. Carrick. 



8 



MINUTES OF THE 



SMITH GROVE — G. S. Smith, Hugh Snyder, Miss Biddie Snyder, 
Miss Elizabeth Beck, Mrs. Zeb Brown, Mrs. J. G. Young. 

SOUTHSIDE— J. W. Clodfelter, Olen Clodfelter, Mose Workman, 
Hosie Hill, Lillie Byerly, Mrs. N. G. Goodin/ 

STONERS GROVE— Mrs. L. E. Lookabill, J. C. Thompson, Hugh 
Wafford. 

SUMMER VILLE — J . L. Carrick, L. C. Carrick, M. L. Bean, Timp 
Bean, Mrs. L. C. Carrick, Mrs. W. H. Carrick. 

TABERNACLE— Mrs. L. A. Carswell, Mrs. C. R. Johnson, Rev. C. 
R. Johnson, Miss Leutella Hames, W. G. Teague, W. L. Smierson, H. 
W. Walker, Mrs. Fred Brooks, Mrs. L. L. Bishop, Mrs. J. H. Shytles, 
Howard Carlton, Mrs. C. L. Barnes. 

TAYLORS GROVE— Jerry Caldwell, Mrs. Add Cranford, Mrs. 
Flatie Russell, A. H. Michael, Mrs. A. H. Michael. 

THOMAS VILLE — Z . V. Cruchfield, L. A. Bruton, L. W. Hansell, 
L. E. Teague, J. N. Wood, T. S. Vogle, Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Mrs. R. 
S. Green, Miss Ellen May Pegg, Mrs. J. Stiwell 

WALLBURG— J. E. Motsinger, Mrs. J. B. Motsinger, C. R. Dodson, 
J. W. Tuttle, Mrs. J. W. Tuttle, Charlie Cook, Walter McCuston, G. 
W. Wall. 

WELCOME— M. L. Graver, Raymond Disher, Mrs. W. W. Brinkley, 

Miss Edna Zimmerman, W. S. Disher, J. E. Crotts. 
WESTFIELD— Not represented. 

VISITORS ENROLLED 
Rev. J. M. Hillard, High Point, N. C, Piedmont Association. 
Miss Cora Lee Cannon, Durham, N. C, Mt. Zion Association. 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Gallimore, Missionaries, Canton, China, 
Rev. John R. Miller, Raeford, N. C, Roberson Association. 
George J. Burnett, Greensboro, N. C, Supt. N. C. Anti-Saloon 
League. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Miller, Greensboro, N. C, Piedmont Associa- 
tion. 

Dr. W. L. Poteat, Wake Forest, N. C, ex-President Wake Forest 
College. 

Dr. J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro, N. C, President N. C. State Bap- 
tist Convention. 

Hugh F. Latimer, Asheville, N. C, Eastern Representative of the 
Relief and Annuity Board. 

NEW PASTORS WELCOMED INTO THE ASSOCIATION 

Rev. J. M. Pickler, Albemarle, N. C, Pastor of Taylors Grove 
Church. 



PROCEEDINGS 



of the 

ONE HUNDRETH ANNUAL SESSION 
of the 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Held With the 
First Baptist Church 
Lexington, N. C. 



FIRST DAY 
Tuesday, Sept. 6th, 1932 

1. The One-Hundredth annual session of the Liberty 
Baptist Association convenes with the First Baptist 
Church, Lexington, N. C, Tuesday, Sept. 6th, 1932, at 
9 :45 A. M. 

2. Devotional service led by Rev. Ira D. Ferguson, 
pastor of Wallburg Church. 

3. The Moderator called the Association to order, for 
the transaction of business. 

4. G. Wilson Miller, of Lexington re-elected Modera- 
tor, Rev. E. F. Mumford, of Wallburg, N. C, re-elected 
Vice-Moderator and Sam J. Smith, of Lexington, N. C, 
was made Clerk and Treasurer. 

5. Rev. J. M. Hayes, Pastor of the Lexington Church, 
delivered a short address of welcome and introduced to 
the Association Rev. Arthur R. Gallimore, Missionary to 
China, who after a few remarks presented to the body a 
gavel which he purchased in Jerusalem. The gavel is 
made of Olive wood, said to have grown on the Mt. of 
Olives. 

The Moderator, G. W. Miller accepted the gavel for the 
body. 

On Motion of Rev. J. M. Hayes, the Association extend- 
ed to Mr. Gallimore a rising vote of thanks for his gift. 

i 6. The following order of business for the session was 
adapted. 



10 MINUTES OF THE 



PROGRAM 
Tuesday Morning 

9:45 Devotional Ira D. Ferguson 

10:00 Election of Officers. 

10:10 Address of Welcome \ Rev. J. M. Hayes 

10:15 Home Missions Rev. J. A. McMillan 

10:45 Religious Literature Rev. B. K. Mason 

11:00 W. M. U.. Miss Sallie McCracken 

Foreign Missions Miss Roxie Sheets 

Address Dr. J. Clyde Turner 

12:10 Recognition of Visitors and Appointment of Committees. 
12:30 Dinner. 

Tuesday Afternoon 

1:30 Devotional Rev. O. P. Dix 

1:45 Hospitals Rev. R. L. West 

2:15 State Missions Rev. E. F. Mumford 

Address Dr. J. R. Jester 

3:00 Sunday Schools R. D. Covington 

3:30 Miscellaneous and Adjournment. 

Evening 

7:30 Devotional Rev. R. N. Honeycutt 

7:45 Mills Home P. V. Critcher 

8:15 Sermon Dr. G. A. Martin 

Wednesday Morning 

9:45 Devotional Rev. Earl Bradley 

10:00 Report of Centennial Committee. 

10:30 Address Dr. W. L. Poteat 

11:15 Report of Executive Committee. 

11:30 State of the Churches Rev. M. O. Alexander 

12:30 Dinner. 

Wednesday Afternoon 

1:30 Devotional Rev. E. C. Roach 

1:45 B. Y. P. U Rev. Walter Wafford 

2:15 Christian Education Rev. C. R. Johnson 

2:45 Ministerial Relief Rev. H. T. Penry 

3:00 Obituaries Rev. S. B. Wilson 

3:15 Miscellaneous and Adjournment. 



7. Rev. J. A. McMillan, Pastor of Mills Home Church 
read the report on Home Missions ; which was adopted. 

HOME MISSION REPORT 

The Home Mission Board is very definitely out from under the 
cloud that passed over it a few years ago. There is no other agency 
v/hose work is viewed with more satisfaction than that of this board 
whose field of labor is the Southland, Cuba, and the Canal Zone. The 
heavy indebtedness is being reduced in a sure and certain manner. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



All obligations are being met promptly, but there is a sad lack of 
funds to carry on our reduced work, and none to meet present oppor- 
tunties. 

The present work is confined largely to evangelism. The moun- 
tain schools, which for years were the chief item of the program of 
the Board have either ceased to exist, or are maintained locally. They 
served their day and generation in a large way, but are not needed 
now that the Baptists of the South have taught the States that 
schools should be provided by the State for all the children. Thirty- 
eight workers among foreigners supply one hundred twenty-two 
churches and mission stations. There are twenty-one workers and 
forty churches and missionaries among the Indians. The Board feels 
its responsibility for the Negroes and maintains six workers for them. 
This number should be greatly multiplied and will be as soon as 
finances permit. Good Will Centers are maintained in a half dozen 
strategic cities. The work in Cuba and Panama is most encouraging. 
Three hundred fifty-two people were baptized in Cuba last year. The 
Balboa Heights Baptist Church of Panama is self-supporting, aggres- 
sive and deeply missionary. The mission stations in the Zone are 
prosperous. Every one is acquainted with the good work of the field 
representatives: Rev. Jacob Gartenhaus, Mrs. Una Roberts Lawrence, 
Dr. J. W. Michaels, and Mr. A. O. Wilson. 

May we note in closing that Dr. J. J. Hill succeeded Dr. G. S. 
Dobbins as editor of Home and Foreign Fields, that periodical that is 
essential to the work of a missionary Baptist church. 

J. A. MCMILLAN. 

8. Rev. B. K. Mason, pastor of Wallburg Church read 
the report on Periodicals; after motion to adopt, it was 
discussed by Rev. B. K. Mason and Archibald Johnson, 
Editor of Charity and Children and was adopted. 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS 

We have two state Baptist papers of which we may be justly 
proud, because among the Baptist papers of the South in their fields, 
they are unexcelled. 

First is the Biblical Recorder, Raleigh, N. C, founded in 1833 by 
Thos. Meredith in Edenton, moved to New Berne in 1835, then to 
Raleigh, its present home, in 1838. N. A. Dunn is president of the 
Board of Directors and J. S. Farmer is the editor and business man- 
ager. The Biblical Recorder is the official organ of the Baptist State 
Convention and has an approximate circulation of 15,000 in a Baptist 
population of around 100,000 homes. 

Charity and Children, Thomasville, N. C, is our other state 
Baptist paper. It is the organ of the Mills Home, was founded in 1887. 
Archibald Johnson is editor and John Arch McMillan is associate 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



editor of our orphanage paper. It has an approximate circulation of 
30,000. 

The difference in circulation is accounted for in the fact Charity 
and Children is in the budget of churches .taking it and the Biblical 
Recorder has been forced to rely on personal subscriptions for support 
and render what service it may be able with the meager response 
given to such personal appeals. The convention has recommended to 
our churches that the Recorder be placed in their budget also. Some 
have accepted this recommendation. 

The Recorder has seen 99 and Charity and Children 45 years of 
faithful service in their special fields of endeavor. 

We heartily commend both papers. Both should be in the budgets 
of all our churches that our people may have the benefit of their in- 
formation and inspirational value. 

B. K. MASON. 

9. Miss Sallie McCracken read the report on W. M. U. 
work, motion was made for its adoption. 

Miss Roxie Sheets read the report on Foreign Missions ; 
motion was made to adopt same. 

MISSION ADDRESS 

The Association was addressed at this time by Dr. J. 
Clyde Turner, President of the North Carolina Baptist 
State Convention, on the subject of Missions. The address 
was most ably delivered and attentively received by the 
body, after which the two reports were adopted. 

THE WOMANS MISSIONARY UNION 

While we are this year celebrating the one hundredth anniversary 
of the Liberty Association, our W. M. U. cannot claim such honors, 
as we only passed our quarter of a century anniversary last year. How- 
ever, I am sure the women have been interested and had a share in 
the work from the beginning. 

Organized work among the women of North Carolina began as 
early as 1805. When Luther Rice returned from India early in the 
19th century to seek help from the Baptists of America for the mis- 
sion work carried on by Adoniram and Anne Haseltine Judson he 
found a hearty response as he travelled over the state of North Caro- 
lina. 

There is one phase of missionary work done many years ago that 
has hardly had the proper recognition, that done by the women of the 
South for the slaves in their homes, reading the Bibles to them and 
teaching them to read it for themselves, and telling the Bible stories 
which delighted them as they sat around in groups listening to the 
wonderful stories selected by their mistresses for the occasion. A lead- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



ing Negro preacher has said that the Southern women were the first 
missionaries to the Negroes. 

Our State W. M. U. work was organized in 1877, but there was de- 
cided opposition to the work of the women in a separate organization, 
so this was disbanded and was not reorganized until the year 1886 at 
which time our present Superintendent, Mrs. W. N. Jones, then Miss 
Sallie Bailey, was elected Corresponding Secretary and has held an 
office in the organization during the forty-six years of its existence. 

The Womans Missionary Union of the Liberty Association was or- 
ganized in 1907 and is now composed of 19 Woman's Missionary Socie- 
ties with 44 Junior organizations, making a total of 62. Our young 
people's societies have grown in number even beyond our greatest ex- 
pectations, 12 new ones having been organized last year. 

Our Associational meeting this year was held in April with the 
Mills Home Church. A very interesting program was rendered. The 
guest speakers were Mrs. George Green, missionary to Africa; Mrs. 
Edna R. Harris, our State Corresponding Secretary, and the closing 
devotional was brought by Dr. A. B. Conrad, of High Point. 

Dinner was served in each of the cottages, thus giving the guests 
a little insight into the home life of the orphanage. In the afternoon 
a brief program was given by the Sunbeams, R. A.'s, and G. A.'s of 
the Mills Home Society. The meeting will be held next year with the 
Wallburg Church. 

Our contributions held up well during the past year, in fact we 
were asked to raise our apportionment for the present year from 
$4,550 to $5,000, and the hearty agreement to this was most encourag- 
ing. We have contributed during the past two quarters $2,711, so it 
seems we will have no trouble in reaching our apportionment. 

Our Heck Memorial offering went this year to the mission school 
operated in China by our North Carolina missionary, Mrs. George W. 
Greene, who has served there for 40 years. The amount raised above 
her needs was applied on the convention debt. Our association gave 
about one hundred dollars for this worthy cause. 

Our work is growing. All these added organizations of young peo- 
ple mean added responsibilities and added opportunities. May we all 
look about us and find our place of service and fill it during the com- 
ing year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

sallie l. Mccracken, 
report on foreign missions 

More than nineteen hundred years ago the Master said, "The 
harvest truly is plentious but the labourers are few." 

Just as truly could he say the same to us were he here in our 
midst today. And he is saying, "Pray ye therefore the Lord of the 
harvest, that He will send forth labourers into His harvest." There 
are wider opportunities presenting themselves to us now than ever 



14 



MINUTES OF THE 



Defore in the history of the world,. The most remarkable progress has 
been made on the Foreign Mission Fields in the past quarter of a 
century. 

We baptized more people last year than .we had church members 
twenty-five years ago. We had only about thirteen thousand mem- 
bers then, whereas in 1931 we had nearly 170,000. 

The work abroad, during the last two years, has stood the strain 
caused by our failure to give it adequate support, in a wonderful way. 

It is good news that 16,568 were baptized last year. This is the 
largest number ever reported in one year. Listen to this report from 
Africa written by one of our missionaries. It is that of a thrilling re- 
vival experience. He tells how a whole village came to Christ and 
says, "One of our Baptist pastors went there and baptized 1,444, and 
another thousand was seeking baptism." They had left their idols 
and they wanted a true and living God, but they did not know how 
to go about finding Him. There are still countless thousands in many 
lands who "do not know how to find Him," and it is your duty and 
mine to stand by our workers at the front and to give "as the Lord 
has prospered us," and even more, that they may continue to give the 
gospel to those who know it not. Our Foreign Mission Board is con- 
fronted by the most critical emergency it has ever faced, because of 
the distressing decline in receipts. 

God has laid on us the duty and privilege of carrying His mess- 
age to the lost, and we must wake up to the grave peril now 
facing our work. The only salvation lies in the increase of gifts. 

We need not only to keep the workers we now have on the 
field, but to send out the many young men and women whom 
God has called to this work. They are so much needed, the board is 
anxious to send them and they are eager to go. 

We must face this matter in the fear of God. He gave his only 
son, his best, Christ gave his life. Shall we, too, do our best? We 
must go on with Him, or He will go alone. 

What will the answer be? 

10. Visitors and New Pastors are recognized at this 
time. See page 6. 

11. Motion is made by Rev. E. F. Mumford that the 
body hold a Spring Session on Friday before the 5th Sun- 
day in April. Motion is adopted. 

12. The Moderator at this time made committee ap- 
pointments as follows : 

ON DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS : Rev. J. A. Mc- 
Millan, Rev. Walter L. Wafford and Sam J. Smith. 

ON FINANCE : R. D. Covington, P. A. Myers and G. 
C. Palmer. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER : C. R. Dodson, 
B. R. Cross and C. 0. Hepler. 

ON NOMINATIONS: M. 0. Alexander, C. M. Wall 
and Miss Sallie McCracken. 

ON OBITUARIES : Rev. S. B. Wilson, Rev. Earl L, 

Bradley and C. H. Teague. 

13. Rev. J. M. Hayes, makes motion that George J. 
Burnett, Supt. of the N. C. Anti-Saloon League be allow- 
ed to speak at this time, motion is carried and Mr. Bur- 
nett makes an earnest speech on the subject of Prohibi- 
tion. 

14. The Body is dismissed by Dr. J. Clyde Turner at 
12 :45 P. M. to reconvene at 1 :45 P. M. 

Tuesday Afternoon Session 

15. The Association reconvenes at time stated. 

Rev. 0. P. Dix, pastor of the Gravel Hill Church con- 
ducts the devotional. His subject was "Importance of the 
Prayer Life." 

16. Rev. R. L. West, pastor of the churches at Caro- 
lina Ave., Southside and Rich Fork read the report on 
the Hospital ; on motion to adopt it was discussed by the 
reader and Rev. E. F. Mumford and was adopted. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

Our Hospital has been doing business for our Lord for about 
ten years, and has been a wonderful success. Perhaps it renders 
a greater immediate service to humanity and is neglected more, 
in the matter of support, than any other institution. We have, 
or some of people seem to have the wrong conception of the Hos- 
pital. Some think because they are Baptist they ought to go free. 
Perhaps this would be true if every church in the state would 
support it. The Baptist Hospital needs the support of every Bap- 
tist., rich or poor. It is wonderfully equipped and has as fine 
a staff of doctors as can be found in the state, and our own girls 
as the nurses. We ought to support it first, last, and always, be- 
cause it is ours. 

RICHARD WEST 

17. Rev. E. F. Mumford, pastor of Abbotts Creek 
Church read the report on State Missions; on motion to 
adopt ; he discussed the report and it was adopted. 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



STATE MISSIONS 

The work of State Missions is carried on through the following 

agencies: 

I. The pastor and his many activities. * 
II. The Sunday School. 

III. The Baptist Young People's Union. 

IV. The Woman's Missionary Union. 

As the Sunday School, the Baptist Young People's Union and the 
Woman's Missionary Union will each have a separate report, this re- 
port will be chiefly confined to the pastor, his duties, work and op- 
portunities. 

In 1931 there were 47 pastors serving 104 churches. The amount 
paid for this service was $35,421.18. During this year, because of the 
lack of funds deductions had to be made. 

During the year 1931, the churches served raised the following: 

For building and repairs • • $12,435.97 

For convention objects 11,919.36 

For other objects 10,809.91 

The average missionary has a large field and meets with many 
perplexing questions. There are many isms to contend with. Thus, 
he comes face to face with the duty of teaching tactfully God's word 
as it is found in the Bible and opportunities are seen on every hand 
for growth, but for the lack of money and service the work makes 
slow progress. 

There is now a crying need for a full-time evangelist to preach to 
and instruct the prisoners in our state prisons and camps. 

There is also an important work that needs to be done among the 
colored Baptist of the State. They need leaders to help them organize 
their work. They have four conventions, virtually independent of 
each other, viz: A Sunday School Convention, a Woman's Conven- 
tion, a Young People's Convention and a Baptist State Convention, 
but no organized State Mission work, except what has been done this 
summer. This summer a Negro worker has been employed during the 
three summer months to work among his brethren in the churches 
holding study classes, Daily Vacation Bible Schools, etc. Good reports 
have come from this work. 

About three years ago because of a financial crisis of the Home 
Mission Board the State Mission Board came to the rescue of the 
Home Mission Board and took over the mission work among the In- 
dians of North Carolina. Last year $2,500.00 was spent for this work 
in Robeson County and the Cherokee work in Swain County. 

During the Spring and Summer months much volunteer evange- 
listic service has been rendered in Eastern North Carolina. Pastors all 
over the State have volunteered their services for expenses only. The 
plan is to have all meetings on a missionary field at one time. On 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



August 1, five pastors went to Hyde County to conduct a ten or twelve 
days' meeting in all the churches. Other groups have been and are 
doing the same work in other missionary fields. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. F. MUMFORD. 

18. The report on Sunday Schools was read by R. D. 
Covington, Treasurer of Mills Home ; on motion to adopt, 
it was discussed by R. D. Covington, Rev. E. F. Mumford 
and Rev. S. B. Wilson and was adopted. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 
The Sunday School is the church at study. It is the church, of 
the church, and for the church. It is an instrument for the advance- 
ment of the Kingdom of God. It has as its text-bood the Word of 
God. It endeavors to enlist all classes and ages in the great work of 
Bible study. It seeks to introduce every pupil to Jesus. It creates an 
interest in missions, stewardship, and in every Kingdom cause. Such 
an institution deserves our earnest prayers and our liberal support. 
In the Bible there are many passages about Bible study such as: 
"Study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that 
needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth." 
2 Timothy 2:15. 

'Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom; teach- 
ing and admonishing one another in Psalms and spiritual songs, sing- 
ing with grace in your hearts to the Lord." Col. 3:16-17. 

These and many other passages encourage us to exalt Sunday 
School work as a means to lead young and old to magnify all phases 
of Kingdom work, to surrender their hearts to Jesus, to let the Holy 
Spirit guide each life as it grows in grace and in the knowledge of 
our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. 

Jesus is our great example as teacher and we would point all Sun- 
day School workers to Him as their ideal. Let them study His 
methods, ponder over His illustrations, meditate upon His many para- 
bles, sit at his feet and learn of Him. 

We recommend to every Sunday School in this Association: 

1. That they take a deeper interest in Sunday School work. 

2. That they try to reach a greater number of unenlisted. 

3. That they conduct Teacher Training Classes at least once each 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. D. COVINGTON. 

19. The Association adjourns at 3 :30 P. M. 

Tuesday Evening Session 

20. The Body reconvened at 7 :30 P. M. 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



21. P. V. Critcher read the report on The Mills Home, 
after motion to adopt it was discussed by Mary Black, 
Grace Bennett, two girls from the home and by P. V. 
Critcher and R. D. Covington. 

Misses Black and Bennett aided by Miss Essie Mae Jar- 
rel and Miss Flossie Stancil two other girls from the Mills 
Home stirred the souls of the audience with two songs. 

"Be Silent" and "Can the World See Jesus in Me?" 

After which the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON THE MILLS HOME 

Though there was no orphanage in North Carolina prior to 1870 
and though many others saw the need, John H. Mills was the first 
man to bring the idea into practical operation. Now the Mills Home, 
named in honor of him and his work, is a Baptist Institution full of 
bright young faces that touch the hearts and purses of young and old 
in Sunday School and Church for their support. Indeed this orphan- 
age is well named. He was the pioneer of child welfare work in North 
Carolina. 

However, the recent tragic death of Supt. Martin Luther Kesler 
of this institution sends a chill through the veins of thousands of Bap- 
tists who loved this Christian man as a leader, as a lover of little 
children, with twenty-seven years of untiring work in supervising and 
improving our orphanage work. God give us more Mills and more 
Keslers. 

From the late Dr. Kesler's report to The Board of Trustees of the 
Mills Home, Inc. I desire to quote: 

"Our population changes very little. We have now (June 4, 1932) 
in the home 632 children, of these 136 are in the Kenndy Home. There 
were 696 children enrolled last year. Prom the beginning 2,923 chil- 
dren have been cared for in the home. There are now 298 children 
with 74 mothers cared for in their own homes by Mothers Aid. Count- 
ing those in the home and those aided with their own mothers we 
have now in our care 932 children. From the beginning we have 
helped by Mothers Aid 929 children, and these added to the whole 
number received into the home runs the number up to 3,852 children 
who have through these forty-seven years felt the kindly touch of 
North Carolina Baptists." 

"The experience of the last two years deepen some of my 
convictions expressed to you at various times before. One you will 
know is that no child should be taken into the institution from his 
mother for reasons of poverty only. I go further and say that no child 
should be taken from his people, mother or father or what not, if 
there is no other reason for his removal. "For poverty only," to be 
sure must be strictly and conscientiously interpreted. Then aid should 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



be given for the same reason and with the same safeguards as Moth- 
ers Aid is given. It would mean an immense saving of expenditure in 
money, and even more in care, worry and broken family life. It 
would give zest to our work if we had the means to lead out and do 
more of this type of children's aid." 

Your reporter makes the following recommendations: 

1. That the churches and Sunday Schools continue their regular 
monthly offerings to this institution. 

2. That the annual Thanksgiving offering be continued. 

3. That for the year 1932 each and every church represented in 
the Liberty Baptist Association hold a memorial service on the Sun- 
day prior to Thursday of Thanksgiving and that if it is possible each 
and every member of each and every church in this Association in- 
crease their Thanksgiving offering. 

4. That it be requested that each and every Christian in said 
Association petition through earnest and fervent prayer to our Divine 
Father for the future leadership in this most important work of child 
welfare. 

Respectfully submitted, 

P. V. CRITCHER. 

22. Rev. M. 0. Alexander read the report of the Com- 
mittee on Nominations. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS 

Associational Director G. W. Miller, Lexington, N. C. 

Orphanage Representative C. M. Wall, Lexington, N. C. 

To prepare reports for next session, see page 3. 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE FOR 1933 

M. O. Alexander Thomasville, N. C. 

G. W. Miller Lexington, N. C. 

S. B. Wilson High Point, N. C. 

Executive Committee, see page 3. 

COMMITTEE ON DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS FOR 1933 

Walter L. Wafford Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith Lexington, N. C. 

Miss Elizabeth Smith Linwood, N. C. 

Prevette Westmoreland Thomasville, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL PROMOTION COMMITTEE FOR 1932-1933 

Chairman, R. D. Covington Thomasville, N. C. 

G. A. Martin Denton, N. C. 

E. F. Mumford Wallburg, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith Lexington, N. C. 

L. E. Teague Thomasville, N. C. 



20 



MINUTES OF THE 



Walter L. Wafford.... 
Miss Sallie McCracken 
Prevette Westmoreland 



. .Lexington, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 



Annual Sermon 



23. Rev. G. A. Martin, pastor of the churches at Den- 
ton and Center Hill preached the Annual Sermon, his sub- 
ject was "Vision, Voice and Challenge." The sermon was 
ably delivered to an attentive audience. 



24. The Association convened at 9 :45 A. M. The De- 
votional was conducted by Rev. Earl L. Bradley, pastor of 
Churchland and Smith Grove churches. 

25. Sam J. Smith read the report of the Centennial 
Committee ; on motion to adopt the report a most interest- 
ing address was made by Dr. W. L. Poteat, ex-President 
of Wake Forest College. His subject was the "Achieve- 
ments of the Last Century." 

The Centennial report was adopted, and a rising vote 
of thanks extended to the reader. A like vote of thanks 
was extended to Dr. Poteat for his masterful address. 

HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

In order that we may better understand the remarks to be made 
about the Liberty Association and more thoroughly appreciate its his- 
tory we will preface our sketch with a few colonial Baptist Historical 
facts. 

Non-Conformists or Dissenters in the Old County — and all true 
Baptists belonged to this class — sought a place where they could 
worship God without fear or molestation from the State Church of 
England. In order that they might enjoy such heritage they were will- 
ing to bid farewell to the land of their nativity and forever cast their 
lots in the far distant wilds of America. 

But alas: on their arrival here they found, to their surprise that 
many Puritans, who had preceded them to this land and who had 
fled England because of Religious persecution, had themselves become 
violent persecutors in America. 

The Baptists and Quakers seemed to have been special objects of 
Colonial Government hate and persecution. 

Persecution and efforts to tax the people for the support of the 
State Church of England by the colonial governments of Massachu- 
setts, Virginia and several of the other colonies was one factor in the 



SECOND DAY 



Wednesday Morning Session 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



spreading of the Baptist Doctrine. This was especially true among 
the Baptists known in the old days as Regular Baptists. The first 
Baptists settlements in this section were Jersey and Abbotts Creek 
about 1755. The Jersey church was of the Regular Baptists while 
that at Abbotts Creek was by the Separate Baptists. 

One historian says "The mercies of the Tuscarora Indians were 
preferable to the whippings and brandings practiced in Virginia and 
other colonies by the Colonial governments to force conformity to the 
established church of England. 

Roger Williams held that non-members should not be forced to 
support the established church of England, and that the Indians 
should be paid for their land. For this he was by law ordered ban- 
ished from Massachusetts. But before he could be captured and sent 
back to England he escaped and took refuge among the Indians, 
bought land from them and established Providence, R. I. Here real 
religious freedom had its birth in America. Here protected to a cer- 
tain extent by the Indians begins Baptist history in America. 

Persecuted in one place Baptist would move on to a new abode. 
The first or second church established in N. C, was at Shiloh in 1727 
by Elder Paul Palmer, in the Chowan section of the State. Palmer 
was born in Maryland, baptized in Delaware, ordained in Connecticut, 
was then in New Jersey, then back into Maryland, and from there to 
N. C, where he established Shiloh. 

Baptists did not escape persecution in N. C. An old colonial rec- 
ord shows that an indictment was made against Palmer and his wife, 
through a malicious prosecution and was kept up for years and finally 
thrown out of court because the witnesses failed to appear. In 1741 
some Baptist men made application to the court at New Bern, this 
State, for a permit to build a church in that town. They were refused 
the permit, whipped in public and required to give bond for their fu- 
ture good behavior. Many other similar incidents could be related if 
time and space permitted. 

In what is now the territory of the Liberty Association, we find 
the first Baptist preachers to be, Benjamin Miller, Shubael Sterns, 
James Younger and Daniel Marshall. Benjamin Miller started the 
work at Jersey in 1754 or 1755. He was pastor of Scotch Plains Bap- 
tist church in New Jersey from its organization in 1747 until his death 
in 1781. It is more than probable that the settlers of the Jersey settle- 
ment in this county, who came from the State of N. J., were many of 
them members of the Scotch Plains church in that state. This fact 
in part at least accounted for the coming of Miller to Jersey. 

Besides he was at the time a missionary for the Philadelphia Bap- 
tist Association. The Scotch Plains church was a member of that 
association. 

Miller was followed at Jersey by John Gano. He also came from 



22 



MINUTES OF THE 



N. J. He served as pastor there for about three years and returned to 
N. J., because of war in this section at that time with the Cherokee 
Indians. 

The Jersey church was enrolled in the Charleston, S. C, Associa- 
tion in 1759, which was the third Baptist Association to be organized 
in America. After Gano left, the church seems to have become dis- 
banded; for we learn that it was reorganized in 1784. Gano left in 
1759, from then until 1784 there is no record of any activities by the 
church. 

On October 16th, 1784 it seems that the scattered tribe from the 
1755 organization got together and invited Elders Drury Sims and 
Wm. Hill to sit with them and organize the newly constituted body. 
This was called the Church of Christ at the Jersey Settlement Meet- 
ing House. At that time it began with a membership of 14 including 
the pastor. Sims was made pastor and served as such until 1790. In 
1793 Thomas Durham a settler in the community was made pastor, he 
was paid no salary, but this congregation made up enough money to 
buy him a slave to do his work, in order that he could preach to them 
three Sundays out of each month. 

It is almost certain that the Jersey church united with the Yad- 
kin Association in its first session October 13, 1786 at Petty's Meeting 
House in Surry County. She joined the new Pee Dee Association in 
August, 1818; the Abbotts Creek Union Association when it was or- 
ganized in 1825 and the Liberty when it was organized in 1832. An 
old record shows that the Jersey church contributed to Robert Daniel 
a Baptist Missionary on September 13, 1823, the sum of $4.88%. 

Abbotts Creek 

In 1755 Sheubel Sterns came from Virginia to Sandy Creek In 
what is now the Northeast corner of Randolph County. Before this 
time a Welch Baptist minister by the name of James Younger came 
by way of S. C. to Abbotts Creek and was preaching on that ground. 
Younger seems to have been the first Baptist to preach in the terri- 
tory which now composes the Liberty Association. What became of 
him is not known. An old preserved manuscript written by one of 
his daughters makes no mention of her father's work and life. An- 
other daughter named Anna married James Evans in the Abbotts 
Creek community. She is buried at Abbotts Creek. I have stood be- 
side her grave. An old head stone bears this inscription, "In Memory 
of Anna Evans — Midwife, Departed Jan. 7, 1843, age 97 years." No 
church was established at Abbotts Creek until 1758 when it was done 
by Daniel Marshall, who came to Abbotts Creek from Sandy Creek at 
the request of James Younger. 

The church at Sandy Creek was organized Nov. 22, 1755, with 18 
members, three years later they had increased to three churches and 
900 members. The first arm was Abbotts Creek, the next Deep River. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



On the second Monday in June, 1758, these three churches formed 
themselves into the Sandy Creek Association. The Sandy Creek was 
the fourth Baptist association to be organized in America. It was the 
first association to reach into what is now the territory of the Liberty. 
The Abbotts Creek church was the first church in the territory now 
covered by the Liberty Association to belong to an associational body. 
In 17 years more the Sandy Creek Association had increased to 42 
churches and 125 ministers, its boundries were on the north the 
Potomac river, on the east, the Atlantic ocean; on the south, S. C, 
and on the West the Mississippi river. It was the first association to 
be organized in this great central Atlantic territory. Daniel Marshall 
was a brother-in-law of Sheubel Sterns, having married his sister. 
He stayed with Abbotts Creek church for five years. 

Marshall left here in 1763 for Beaver Creek in S. C. For the next 
twenty years, until 1783 we have no record of the activities of the 
Abbotts Creek church. A large number of the settlers in the com- 
munity went with Marshall to South Carolina; one historian says it 
is probable that they carried the church organization with them. In 
1783 George Whitefield Pope came to Abbotts Creek as pastor and 
served for 31 years. He was followed by Ashley Swaim in 1814, who 
served the church till the denomination split, and the organization of 
the Liberty Association. 

We have seen that it was a charter member of the Sandy Creek 
Association, it did not join the Pee Dee; the next association to be 
organized in this territory but remained with the Sandy Creek until 
the organization of the Abbotts Creek Union Association in 1825, and 
then helped to organize the Liberty in 1832. 

Jersey and Abbotts Creek churches being the two oldest in this 
section of course have the richest history, but it is well enough here 
to give some facts about the other churches, which existed before the 
birth of the Liberty Association and helped to organize it. 

Lick Creek 

There is not a ray of light as to who first preached here, or how 
the work started. There is some little record that the work was 
started in 1784. In 1787 the church at Abbotts Creek received a re- 
quest from Lick Creek for help. In 1805 the body requested Jersey 
church for help to constitute them into a church. But for some rea- 
son the church was not constituted until 1808. That same year it 
joined the Sandy Creek Association. 

It joined the Pee Dee Association when it was formed in 1816. In 
1819 the annual meeting of the Pee Dee Association was held with 
the Lick Creek church. It went into the Abbotts Creek Union Asso- 
ciation when it was organized in 1825 and was one of the seven orig- 
inal members of the Liberty. We will show later how the Lick Creek 
church and its pastor may be termed the parents of the Liberty Asso- 
ciation. Its pastor in 1832 at the time of the split was Eli Carroll. 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



Holloways 

This place was set off as an arm of Jersey in 1795. It later be- 
came an arm of Tom's Creek church. In 1831 Tom's Creek church 
granted them letters of dismission in order that they might be con- 
stituted into a church. It was constituted as a church the third Sun- 
day in January, 1831, and enrolled in the Abbotts Creek Union Asso- 
ciation that year. The next year it was one of the seven churches to 
organize the Liberty Association. 

The anti -missionary element seems to have been in the minority 
here at the time of the split. They withdrew fellowship from the ma- 
jority. At the time Rev. Eli Carroll was pastor of the church and re- 
mained with them for 11 years. 

Liberty 

An arm of Tom's Creek was set off at Liberty in 1824. On August 
22, 1829, Elders Eli Phillips, Jesse Sowell and Ashley Swaim sat with 
the following deacons from Tom's Creek: Sherwood Kennedy, Mathias 
Skeen, Rhode Riley and Henry Workman as a Presbytery to consti- 
tute the church. 

The Abbotts Creek Union association was organized at Liberty 
church in 1825 a little more than a year after it had been set off as 
an arm of Tom's Creek. Liberty joined the Abbotts Creek Union 
Association in 1829. The 1830 annual meeting of the Abbotts Creek 
Union Association was held with the Liberty church. In 1832 it help- 
ed to constitute the Liberty Association. The association was named 
in honor of this church. 

The churches at Jersey, Abbotts Creek, Lick Creek, Holloways 
and Liberty were five of the seven churches which organized and 
originally constituted the Liberty Association. Another which was 
within its present bounds and is now extinct helped to organize it, 
and was an original member of it, this was Tom's Creek. The seventh 
church in the organization was Jamestown, which later, became High 
Point, this church joined the Piedmont Association several years ago. 

We have seen that the Sandy Creek Assocaition was organized in 
1758, and how it grew so rapidly in bounds and numbers. In 1816 it 
was divided, with most all the churches on this side of Deep River 
forming themselves into the Pee Dee Association. Two churches now 
members of the Liberty Association, Abbotts Creek and Lick Creek 
once belonged to the Sandy Creek as we have seen. So did Tom's 
Creek. 

After the Pee Dee the next association to be born in this territory 
was the Abbots Creek Union, which we have already stated was 
organized at Liberty church in 1825. Abbotts Creek of the Sandy 
Creek Association and several churches from the Pee Dee Association 
had been dismissed in order that they might form themselves into a 
new association. The new association was called the Abbotts Creek 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



25 



Union. Just why this body was formed is not entirely clear, but some 
of the churches left the Pee Dee because it was not as active in mis- 
sions at the time as they thought it should be. 

The following churches now members of the Liberty once belonged 
to the old Abbotts Creek Union Association. Lick Creek, Jersey, Ab- 
botts Creek, Liberty and Holloways. The Abbotts Creek Union Asso- 
ciation still exists as a Primative Baptist body. 

Birth of the Liberty Association 

We have seen how Benjamin Miller, Sheubel Sterns and Daniel 
Marshall planted churches in this section of the State about 1755. 
For 70 years after this Baptist churches spread and multiplied with 
a limited amount of internal dissension and strife over Biblical doc- 
trine and principles. But this was not ever to be the case. From 1825 
to 1835 we find there was much bitterness, dissension, and strife with- 
in the churches between two groups. One group favored missions, 
Sunday Schools and the work of the Baptist State Convention, the 
other opposed these. The feeling grew so strong that a division was 
inevitable. 

The division in the territory that is now covered by the Liberty 
Association came in 1832 at the annual meeting of the Abbotts Creek 
Union Association at Mt. Tabor Meeting House in what is now the 
Northwest corner of Randolph County. 

The introductory sermon was preached. Isaiah Spurgeon took 
his seat as Moderator of the body. The letters from the various 
churches were called for; two were presented purporting to be from 
the church at Lick Creek. The clerk read the letter from the ma- 
jority, who claimed to be the true church. In this letter they named 
messengers and instructed them not to sit with any persons, who fa- 
vored missions or advocated the Baptist State Convention. We have 
no record, who the leaders of this majority were. The two letters 
confused the Moderator, he asked for advice. Elder John Culpepper, 
who was attending the association as a visiting messenger from the 
Pee Dee suggested that the letters be received from the undivided 
churches and then the body would be competent to determine which 
letter should be receivd from Lick Creek. His proposal was rejected, 
being opposed by Ashley Swaim, a leader of the anti-mission element. 

Moderator Spurgeon then proposed that the divided churches ask 
for help from the association and try to bring about a reconciliation 
of their membership. This was opposed by Ashley Swaim, Philip 
Snider, Solomon Snider and others and was rejected. 

The rules of decorum were read and it was ruled by the Modera- 
tor that the Association had no right to interfere with the affairs of 
an individual church. 

Ashley Swaim said he understood that Rev. Eli Carroll and his 
followers in the Lick Creek church had withdrawn from the church. 
Carroll was pastor of the Lick Creek church at the time. 



26 



MINUTES OF THE 



Carroll replied that the majority had declared those who favored 
missions, Sunday Schools and the Baptist State Convention out of 
their fellowship; and that he and his followers had withdrawn in or- 
der not to be excluded. John Culpepper then made a short defense 
and explanation of missions, the Baptist State Convention and Sun- 
day Schools. 

Moderator Spurgeon said "I have no fellowship with any of these 
institutions." And expressed a hope that all who held with him would 
proceed. James Brown asked if he meant to exclude those who favor- 
ed these institutions? He answered "We can not serve God and 
Mammon, he who is not for us is against us." The question was put 
and the association voted to exclude those who favored these institu- 
tions, and expressed a hope that they would retire and trouble them 
no more. 

During the controversy Jesse Sowell said that he had been ex- 
pelled from the Tom's Creek church because he had given $1.00 to 
missions and had attended the Baptist State Convention. 

The Abbotts Creek Union Association then proceeded with its 
business. While it did so the churches or parts of churches rejected 
went out under a tent on the grounds and organized the Liberty As- 
sociation. Out of a membership of 50 at Lick Creek, Pastor Carroll 
only had 10 with him. One hundred forty-eight from the churches 
at Jersey, Abbotts Creek, Tom's Creek, Jamestown, Liberty and Hollo- 
ways with these 11 from Lick Creek formed the total membership of 
the Liberty Association at the time it was organized. 

These 159 persons were not the total membership of these seven 
churches, it was but a small part of it in some of the seven churches, 
a majority in one or two, but not the entire membership of any one 
of them. 

After a brief organization meeting in a tent at Mt. Tabor Meeting 
House on September 24, 1832, the Liberty Association adjourned to 
meet on November 17, the same year with the church at Jamestown. 

At the meeting at Jamestown the following report was made by 
the churches. 

Churches Messengers Bapt. Mem. Cntrb. 

Lick Creek— Eli Carroll, John Parks, Dempsey Parks 13 34 $ .97% 
Jersey— Josiah Wiseman, Humphrey Owen Richard 

Owen • • 5 68 1.15 

Abbotts Creek — Alex Thomas, Joseph Spurgeon, Wm. 

Raper • .... 3 18 1.57% 

Tom's Creek — Jesse Sowell, Benj. Lanier, Jas. Brown 15 1.20 
Jamestown — Wm. Burch, Isaac Beeson, David Idol.. 9 1.25 

Liberty — Peter Owen, John Fine, Wm. Owen 27 1.50 

Holloways — Christopher Hedrick, Thos. Hatcher 2 17 .50 

Two Friends of Zion Contributed .50 

Totals • • 23 188 $8.60 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



This $8.60 was probably the minute fund, for on August 3, 7, 1832, 
at the Baptist State Convention, before the organization of the Lib- 
erty Association on September 24, 1832; we find that these seven 
churches had contributed for Home Missions $42.09, Foreign Missions 
$28.44 and to education $13.64. 

From these reports it seems that these seven churches raised out- 
side of pastors salaries in the year 1832 $92.77, an average of nearly 
50 cents per member. Not a high average, but they were planting the 
acorn, from which was to come the oak, during the last few years our 
contributions have averaged $10 or more per member. 

The next session of the Liberty Association was held with the 
church at Holloways in November, 1833. This was the first session of 
the Liberty ever held within its present bounds. 

Churches Which Came Into the Liberty Association After Its Organ- 
ization and Are Still Members of It 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— The work was started here by Elder Wm. 
Dowd, who came to this section from Moore County. He was pastor at 
Jamestown and Abbotts Creek. He commenced preaching in a school 
house a short distance East of where the church now stands in 1825 
or 1826. 

The church was constituted on January 27, 1827. Dowd served as 
pastor till 1833, when he moved to Tennessee. At the time of the split 
the church lost its records. They were carried West by some one 
migrating to that section. 

It is not known why this church was not a member of the Liberty 
Association during the first few years of its history. Other early pas- 
tors here included Peter Owen, Josiah Wiseman, Alfred Kinney, F. H. 
Jones, Wm. Turner and Henry Sheets. Turner served as pastor for 
33 years. Sheets served for nine years and it was during his pastorate 
that the brick church was built, as a memorial to the late Wm. Tur- 
ner. Turner had it in his heart to build the church, but passed on to 
his reward before the work was started. Rev. John R. Miller recently 
served here as pastor for several years. 

REEDS — Preaching was held at this place as early as 1790. On 
February 6th, 1795 the Jersey trustees paid George Reed five shillings 
for two acres of land to build a church on. It was an arm of the 
Jersey church for more than forty years. The church was constituted 
on October 12, 1839, with a membership of 25. Richard Owen and 
Daniel Wommack were the first deacons. Pastors, who served here in 
the old days were Josiah Wiseman, Wm. H. Hammer, Wm. Turner, 
Azariah Williams, Amos Weaver, Wm. Lambeth, J. B. Jackson, Aaron 
Yarbrough, Pinkney Oliver, E. Allison, H. Morton, John F. Redwine, 
Henry Sheets and Thomas Carrick. 

CHURCHLAND— This place was known in its early history as 
Pine Meeting House. Preaching was started at this place sometime 



28 



MINUTES OF THE 



before 1800, the exact date is not known. In 1803 Benjamin Abbott 
for the sum of $25.00 deeded three acres of land at this place jointly 
to the Lutherans, Presbyterians, Methodists and Baptists. They were 
known jointly as the Revival Congregation. * 

The Baptists had no church organized here until May, 1837. 
Joseph Pickler and Josiah Wiseman, pastors at Fork and Jersey 
churches constituted the Presbytery of organization. They were the 
first two pastors there, followed by C. W. Bessant, Azariah Williams, 
Benjamin Lanier, Aaron Yarbrough, H. Morton, Wm. Turner, H. 
Sheets. About 1906 this church had the largest membership of any 
church in the association. 

THOMASVILLE— The first record we have here is an old entry 
in a church book, which reads as follows, "There was no regular 
meeting from the 17th day of August, 1859, until Saturday before the 
second Sunday in April, 1869. The church was received into the Lib- 
erty Association in 1859. In that year it reported nine members with 
John Mitchell as pastor. In 1888 it reported a membership of 44, at 
that time J. N. Stallings was pastor. In 1870 it only had 18 members. 
Other early pastors here were J. B. Jackson, J. B. Richardson, H. Fon- 
taine, F. M. Jordon, J. J. James, H. Morton, C. G. Wells, J. M. Hil- 
liard, W. H. Rich and G. A. G. Thomas. This church now has over 
600 members. 

LEXINGTON — Lexington was one of the county seats in the state 
in which the Baptists were tardy in establishing a church. Some- 
time before the Civil War the Baptist State Convention sent Elder 
William Bryan here to preach once a month, but there was so little 
to encourage him that he gave up the undertaking. In 1879 Rev. 
Henry Sheets, who was missionary for the Liberty Association was 
passing through town. He was hailed almost in front of where the 
church now stands and urged to spend the night in town and hold a 
service. That night a prayer meeting was held in the residence of 
Moses Lamb, which stood on the lot immediately north of the present 
church lot. In 1881 Rev. S. F. Conrad came here as a missionary to 
take charge of the work. The church was constituted on July 3, 1881. 
The Presbytery consisted of W. H. Hammer, J. B. Richardson, and S. 
F. Conrad. Eighteen members constituted its membership at the time 
of its constitution. The membership is now nearly 900. Some cf its 
pastors have been besides Conrad, S. H. Thompson, L. E. Duncan, P. 
O. Duncan, Thomas Carrick, J. H. Lambeth, who died while pastor, 
W. H. Rich, W. A. Smith, A. K. Wright and Fred D. Hale. The first 
building was erected in 1883. Rev. R. Gallimore, a member of the 
church, has been a missionary in China for 14 years. 

SUMMER VTLLE — This church was constituted on July 6, 1873. 
Elders A. P. Stoker and John P. Styers served as the Presbytery. Mr. 
Stoker was called as pastor and served for 14 years. He served one or 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



two shorter pastorates after this. Among the pastors here besides 
Stoker have been John A. Summey, G. W. Henderson, M. J. Leach, 
L. G. Lewis. 

The church was received into the association in 1874 with 37 
members. In 1890 the church reported a membership of 124. A short 
time after this the Denton Baptist church was organized, largely from 
the membership at Summerville. It now has a membership of nearly 
300. 

DENTON — Preaching was begun here in 1890. After preaching 
was discontinued at Tom's Creek, an effort was made to have the old 
organization moved to Denton and continue as Tom's Creek church. 
But it was found the plan could not be carried out. A Presbytery 
was called on August 30, 1891 to dissolve the old Tom's Creek church. 
Immediately after the dissolution, the same Presbytery sat and con- 
stituted the Denton church. It was organized with a membership of 
38; several of which were members of the old Tom's Creek organiza- 
tion. H. Morton was the first pastor. Some of his successors have been 
H. Morris, John A. Summey, Jeff Lanning, J. M. Bennett. In 1907 its 
membership was around 90. It is now about 250. 

MILLS HOME— The orphanage was established in 1884. The 
church was constituted on April 28, 1891. There had been pretty regu- 
lar preaching at the institution all the time by Baptist ministers liv- 
ing near or by visiting ones. Rev. Henry Sheets served here under 
appointment of the State Board during 1888. During this time he 
baptized seven boys and seven girls, the first of the orphanage chil- 
dren to be baptized. The membership of this church has been made up 
at 'all times of the children of the orphanage and the officials and 
employees of the institution. It has since its organization been a 
leader in the association in its spirituality and contributions. Among 
its first pastors were J. D. Newton, J. M. Hillard, S. W. Hall, W. H. 
Rich, C. A. G. Thomas and Geo. P. Harrill. In 1906 its membership 
was 166, it is now over 400. 

RICH FORK — This church was established on December 2, 1884, 
near the home of the late J. H. Mills and largely through his efforts. 
It was constituted with 18 members. H. Morton was the first pastor. 
Rev. Henry Sheets followed him, some other pastors here have been 
J. D. Newton, John A. Summey, and John R. Miller. The church 
built a very substantial brick building in 1926. Its membership now is 
around 250. 

WALLBURG— This church was established September 4, 1892. 
Elders J. N. Stallings and Henry Sheets served as the Presbytery. 
Stallings was called as the first pastor. C. C. Smith and P. N. Mot- 
singer were the first deacons. C. M. Wall was the first Sunday School 
Superintendent. Henry Sheets was the second pastor. It was at this 
point that the Liberty Institute or Wallburg High School was con- 



30 



MINUTES OF THE 



ducted by the Baptist of the association for many years. A committee 
was appointed at a Union meeting in November, 1902, to choose a 
suitable location for a school and make arrangements for opening 
same. The people at Wallburg offered the best inducements, the 
school was located here and run most successfully for many years. 

STONERS GROVE— During the years 1898 and 1899 J. M. Ben- 
nett, John R. Miller and W. H. Rich preached in the school house 
near this place. The Holloways church established an arm at this 
place in 1900. It was constituted into a church March 6, 1900. Jeff 
Lanning became the first pastor and served for many years. This 
church has never been large in numbers, but it has been a leader in 
contributions. 

TAYLORS GROVE— The work was started here by John A. Sum- 
mey. The church was constituted on September 29, 1901, with 17 
members. It is located in a Methodist community and has never ex- 
perienced any growth of great note. Its present membership is 
around 20. 

GRAVEL HILL— In 1901 A. A. Loflin donated the land and a 
house of worship was built at this place, a meeting was held the same 
year by Rev. L. G. Lewis and the church was constituted on November 
21st of that year. The church is located in the Southwest corner of 
Randolph County. It and Westfield, which is also located in Ran- 
dolph are the only churches in the Liberty Association outside of 
Davidson County. The church now has 61 members, and during the 
last year has built a substantial brick building. 

Other churches which are now members of the Liberty Associa- 
tion and which have been organized during the last 25 or 30 years are 
Smith Grove, Southside, Center Hill, Tabernacle (Erlanger), Welcome, 
Westfield, Sheets Memorial and Carolina Avenue. 

The following churches once belonged to the Liberty Association 
and have since gone to other associations, Salisbury, Greensboro, 
Clemmonsville, Pleasant Grove, now Randleman; Kernersville, Big 
Creek, now El Dorado, High Point and Asheboro. Of these Jamestown, 
now High Point and El Dorado were among the older churches in 
this section, they once belonged to the old Abbotts Creek Union Asso- 
ciation. 

Churches which once belonged to the Liberty Association and 
have become extinct are Tom's Creek, i. e. the missionary branch of 
it, Stokers Chapel, Pleasant Fork, Marion, Oak Hill. These churches 
were located in Eastern Davidson, Western Randolph and Northwest- 
ern Montgomery Counties. All honor to the preachers who labored at 
these places and the good people who composed their membership, 
but much of the seed sown at these places fell on rocky soil and 
among the thorns and thistles. 

None of these churches existed over a long period of years except 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



Tom's Creek. The church at that place had a varied and interesting 
history. It was constituted on October 29, 1811, after it had 
been an arm of Jersey for a few years. Before the split Nathan Riley 
and James B. Badgett who lived in the neighborhood were the pastors 
of the church. At the time of the division Jesse Sowell seems to have 
been the pastor. The mission element held the old church and rec- 
ords. The anti-mission element went about three miles away and 
built New Tom's Creek church, which still exists. It is not common 
that the anti-mission element has outlived the mission. But lets see 
why this was true here. The majority of its membership in 1832 were 
in sympathy with missions, Sunday Schools and the Baptist State 
Convention. During the Civil War, missionary endeavors by the as- 
sociation were practically suspended. But in the early 70's the associa- 
tion began to take on new life in this line. Efforts were made to raise 
money for this purpose in the churches. When it was mentioned at 
Tom's Creek it was ridiculed in open conference by a preacher as well 
as by the members. The opposition was not only against the work 
but also against the individuals, who advocated it. The church sealed 
its doom, its numbers steadily declined until it was dissolved in 1891. 

Elder Henry Sheets in writing about the church penned the fol- 
lowing words: "It is sad indeed to pen these lines, this was the 
church into which the author was baptized, and where he received his 
ordination to the gospel ministery. 

"No church, nor family, nor individual church member, can ob- 
struct or in anywise hinder the work of a church of Jesus Christ and 
hope to escape God's displeasure." 

This church probably joined the old Sandy Creek Association in 
1812. 

Early Missionary Work in the Liberty Association 

The first report made to the association on mission work was at 
the 1837 session. During that year Elder Barton Roby worked for 80 
days as a missionary in the association. Other missionaries, who lab- 
ored in the association before the Civil War were, Benjamin Lanier, 
Azariah Williams, William Turner, Richard Jacks, W. N. Herriford 
and Amos Weaver. 

In 1856 the association employed four part-time missionaries. 

For 15 years during and after the war little or no missionary work 
was done. Several attempts to revive the work were made, which 
were not successful until the 1877 session of the association held with 
the church at El Dorado. From then on for many years associational 
missionaries were kept on the field, some of whom were R. A. Moore, 
Henry Sheets, H. Morton, D. C. Culbreth, B. C. Copple, John A. Sum- 
mey, Thomas Carrick, J. D. Newton, J. N. Stallings, W. F. Watson, L. 
G. Lewis, M. J. Leach, W. H. Rich, G. A. Thomas and Geo. P. Harrill. 

These men were kept in the field by the association, not by the 



32 



MINUTES OF THE 



State Board. They gave a part of their time in assisting the weak 
churches and in various other ways. 

Sunday Schools 

Seven small churches were rejected by v the Abbotts Creek Union 
Association; one ground upon which they were rejected was because 
they favored Sunday Schools. But in these seven churches Sunday 
Schools had a struggle to get started and to exist. In fact it was with 
very much irregularity that they did exist for many years. 

From the organization of the association in 1832 until 1844 not 
one word is said in the records about Sunday Schools. 

In 1845; Not a single school in the association. 

In 1846; Report, but nothing being done. 

In 1847; Committee on Sunday Schools have nothing of interest 
to report. 

In 1851; two or three churches in association have irregular 
schools. 

In 1854; But one Sunday School in the association. 

In 1859; But little being done in the line of Sunday Schools. 

In 1861; The Committee urges the brethren to do more than talk. 

In 1867; Only two schools in successful operation. 

In 1873; Five schools with an enrollment of 263. 

In 1878; Nine schools with 587 enrolled. 

In 1905 ; Sunday Schools in almost all churches, 2,028 enrolled. 
In 1931; Sunday School in every church except one, 6,204 enrolled. 

Some Early Baptist Preachers in the Liberty Territory Before and 
Since Its Organization 

BENJAMIN MILLER — Some facts concerning him in connection 
with the Jersey church have already been given. He was made pastor 
of Scotch Plains church in New Jersey when it was organized in 1747. 
He was a native of N. J. But little is known of his life before his 
conversion in 1837. He served as pastor of Scotch Plains church for 
34 years, during this time he did outside work over a large territory. 
Besides the work he did at Jersey church, he also helped to organize 
the First Baptist church of New York City in 1862, which was organ- 
ized as an arm of the Scotch Plains church. 

The Scotch Plains church was a member of the Philadelphia As- 
sociation and it was as a missionary of the Philadelphia Association 
that he came to Jersey. He died November 14, 1781, and is buried at 
Scotch Plains, N. J. 

JOHN GANO — He descended from a French Huguenot refugee 
of 1688, who corrupted his name into Gano. When around 20 years 
of age he was converted under Benjamin Miller, and began preaching 
before he joined the church. He was ordained at Hopewell, N. J., 
in May, 1754. 

Immediately after he made an extended Southern trip, going as 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



33 



far as Charleston, S. C. On his return he came back by Jersey. The 
people at Jersey were so favorably impressed with him that they sent 
two men all the way to New Jersey to ask his church to give him up 
in order that he might come and labor with them. His church con- 
sented. In 1856 he came back to Jersey church, where he remained 
for about three years; the church was constituted while he was there. 
The reason for his leaving is found in his own statement, "The reason 
of my leaving this place was the war with the Cherokee Indians." He 
owned a farm in the Jersey settlement which he did not sell when 
he left. He later served as pastor of the First Baptist Church in New 
York City for 26 years. 

He was a chaplain in Washington's army during the Revolution. 
Washington stood one day and listened to one of his sermons, and 
when he had finished he asked him to baptize him. Washington said 
"I am an Episcopalian and expect to remain such, but I want you to 
baptize me. The request was granted and Gano baptized Washington 
in the presence of about 40 persons. This was at Valley Forge. 

DANIEL MARSHALL — We have seen how he came to Abbotts 
Creek at the request of James Younger, and founded Abbotts Creek 
church. 

He was born at Windsor, Conn., in 1706. He was converted when 
about 20 years of age and joined the Presbyterian church. He was 
about 38 years of age when that flaming herald of the Cross, George 
Whitefield visited New England. There was something new and un- 
usual in Whitefield's manner. He was on fire himself and kindled a 
Holy Zeal in those who heard him. Marshall was one of these. 

We will digress here to say a few words about the old Regular and 
Separate Baptists. Before the coming of Whitefield the churches had 
become very careless about the reception of members, many were re- 
ceived, who had not been converted. Whitefield preached a new doc- 
trine, and said "You must be Born Again." His followers in the Bap- 
tist church became known as Separate Baptist because they con- 
tended that none but converted people should be received into the 
church. They would admit no one to membership until they had 
shown satisfactory evidence of a new birth. 

Those who clung to the old order became known as Regular Bap- 
tists, they held to Predestination and Calvinism, and had many in 
their churches, who had been baptized, but had not been converted. 

The church at Jersey was established by Regular Baptists, while 
that at Abbotts Creek was established by the Separate Baptists. For 
years there was little or no correspondence or relationship between 
these two churches because of this fact. At the time Marshall came 
to Abbotts Creek, there was difficulty in securing a Presbytery to or- 
dain him. If Gano was at Jersey he was not called upon, it is thought 
that Gano had not yet arrived, for a friendly relationship later 



34 



MINUTES OF THE 



existed between Gano and Sterns. A Regular Baptist preacher in 
S. C. was requested to come to Abbotts Creek and help ordain Mar- 
shall. He refused, saying "I have no relationship with Sterns' party. I 
believe them to be a disorderly set." Marshall was later ordained by 
his two brothers-in-law, a Mr. Ledbetter from S. C, and Sheubcl 
Sterns. The Old Sandy Creek Association was a Separate Baptist 
Association. The Jersey church never did belong to that body. 

The two branches of Baptists later became united over the entire 
country. 

Their chief differences were over methods of receiving members 
and holding protracted meetings. 

The split that come again in 1832 was to some extent a parting 
of the way again between these old branches. 

The Regulars in many ways were like our present Primitive Bap- 
tists, while the Separate Baptists were thoroughly missionary in their 
endeavors. 

Marshall's son in speaking of his father and the work of White- 
field said, "My father was one of thousands, who heard that son of 
thunder, George Whitefield, and caught his fire." 

Marshall was one of the missionaries that went to preach among 
the Indians in the Susquehanna territory. He went from there to near 
Winchester, Va. Here he joined a Baptist church and was licensed! 
to preach. From there he and Sheubel Sterns with their families 
came to Sandy Creek, from Sandy Cr&ek he went to Abbotts Creek 
and constituted a church, which was sometime between 1756 and 
1758. He stayed here for a few years and went to S. C, where he was; 
greatly blessed in his work. He died November 2, 1784, and is buried, 
at Appling Court House, Ga. 

GEORGE WHITEFIELD POPE— Of the many noble and conse- 
crated men who toiled for Christ in his day, few did as much as Geo. 
W. Pope. He was born in England; was a leader in the Old Sandy 
Creek Association. But the fact that concerns us most is the fact 
that he followed Marshall as pastor at Abbotts Creek and served! 
as such for over 30 years, from 1783 to 1813. His father came across; 
and settled at Philadelphia when he was 6 years of age. His father 
soon died, his mother moved to Baltimore, and from there to Guilford 
County this State. When and where he was ordained is not known,, 
but probably at Sandy Creek. He would often pray that all his de- 
scendants might follow him in the Baptist faith. His prayer was an- 
swered; but while he was pastor at Abbotts Creek one of his daughters 
was expelled from the church because she attended a dance. He* 
was not offended at the action of the church. It is said that he could 
often be heard for a mile away while preaching or singing. 

He was a loyal American during the Revolution, since he was borm 
in England this offended the Tories. One day while he was pastor at 
Abbotts Creek a body of men called for him, he was not at home, they 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



35 



left word with his wife for him to meet them at a school house that 
night. Upon meeting them as requested he learned that they were 
Tories and intended to kill him. 

He begged to be permitted to preach to them, they finally agreed, 
he preached with such power and conviction, that after his message 
they told him to go home in peace. He died in 1818 in S. C. 

ELI CARROLL — This man as we have shown could be termed the 
father of the Liberty Association. He was born in Orange County, 
December 20th, 1785. Was married in 1810 and settled on a farm two 
miles Southeast of Lick Creek Church, where he lived, died and was 
buried. The first record of his church work we find, is that he was 
a delegate to the Sandy Creek Association from Lick Creek Church in 
1814. An old record of Jersey Church dated July 12, 1817, says that 
Lick Creek church called on them to help ordain Carroll to the minis- 
try. He had been preaching 15 years when the split occurred. Some 
of the leaders had prejudiced a part of the Baptist people against 
missions, etc. But Eli Carroll advocated missions, Sunday Schools 
and the Baptist State Convention and stood like a stone wall, with 
Benj. Lanier, Wm. Buch, Jessee Sowell, Wm. Dowd, Eli Phillips and a 
few others, and as a result of their activities the Liberty Association 
was organized. He was the most prominent figure in the association 
for many years after it was organized. He was its moderator eight of 
its first nine years. Peached three of the first eight Introductory Ser- 
mons. For several years after its birth he was pastor of three of its 
seven churches, Lick Creek, Liberty and Holloways. During his min- 
istry he served other churches in the association as well as some out- 
side. 

Many of his descendants now live in the county. He died on 
June 22, 1846. 

ALFRED KINNEY— Was born in what is now Davidson County, 
July 2, 1801. He was ordained to the ministry after he was 40 years 
of age. He was pastor of Lick Creek Church for 22 years, Holloways 
18 years, he also served as pastor at New Friendship, El Dorado and 
some churches in Stanly County. He had been a member of the Lick 
Creek Church about four years when the split came, and went out 
with the anti-mission element, but later came back and told them that 
he was wrong and wanted them to receive him back. This was before 
he was ordained. He was uneducated but an able preacher. One day 
after he had preached at Liberty Church, Elder J. J. James suggested 
to him it might be well for him to keep a dictionary close by. He re- 
plied, "Brother James I have the advantage over you, when you want 
a word you have to go to the dictionary for it, when I want one I 
just make it and go a head." 

WILLIAM TURNER — This man was perhaps more dearly beloved 
by all the people than any other man who ever labored as pastor in 



3G 



MINUTES OF THE 



the association. He was born June 23, 1816, joined Jersey Church in 
1834 and was ordained in 1844. He served as a pastor in the associa- 
tion for 45 years. His ministry was a crowded one, many churches 
wanted him, but his time was always taken up. He had rare gifts as 
a preacher. His pastorates were long above the average in length. 
Often he would melt an entire audience to tears with a timely illustra- 
tion, hold them spellbound and move them with his pathos as rarely 
ever seen. During the last nine years of his life he was so afflicted 
that he had to sit on a high stool and deliver his messages, but this 
did not detract from their effectiveness. He often said he wanted to 
die in the harness. His wish was granted. On April 6, 1889, he had 
preached at New Friendship, where he had been pastor for 33 years, on 
the way home he fell into the arms of his wife and went to be with 
Christ, whom he had preached for 45 years. "Blessed are the dead 
that die in the Lord." 

PETER OWEN — Was the first clerk of the association; he served 
as such for 10 years; he lived in the Liberty section. He was at Mt. 
Tabor when the association was organized. He served the Liberty 
Church as pastor for several years, was also pastor at the Old Marion 
Church which has been extinct for many years. He and his family 
moved West in 1842. 

BENJAMIN LANIER— Was born in this county July 26, 1807, was 
an ordained minister for more than 60 years. He served many 
churches in this and adjoining counties, two in Stanly County for 
over 20 years, Tom's Creek his home church for over 30 years. He 
helped to organize the association. It was under his ministry that 
the late Henry Sheets was converted. 

He was Moderator of the association for 17 years, died August 5, 
1893 at the age of 87. 

HENRY SHEETS— The ministry of this widely loved and known 
man began soon after the Civil War. For over 50 years he preached 
on the field of the Liberty Association, where he spent his entire life. 

Besides his service in his home association, which in some way, if 
not as pastor, reached every church in it during his day, he served 
churches in the surrounding counties of Davidson, Cleveland, Rowan, 
Stanley, Montgomery, Randolph, Guilford and Forsyth. 

The Liberty Association is indebted to him in a greater way than 
to any other man, who ever labored in its bounds. Besides his faith- 
ful services as pastor of churches in the association over a period of 
50 years, he served as clerk of the association for 36 years and was 
Moderator for five years. But his greatest single piece of work was his 
writing a history of the Liberty Association. He spent much time and 
labor in gathering the material. Sheets' History of the Liberty Asso- 
ciation was published in 1906, eleven years before the death of its 
author. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



37 



Brother Sheets never reecived any financial returns from the 
book, but he compiled information concerning Baptist in this section, 
which makes his memory dear to every loyal member of the denomi- 
nation in the association. He went to his eternal reward on Sunday, 
September 30, 1917. He served as clerk of the association just a few 
days before his death. 

The words of this historical sketch of the Liberty Association are 
largely quotations from his history of the body. 

Other ministers, who labored in this territory during early Baptist 
history and whose work is worthy of mention were Drury Sims, Wil- 
liam Dowd, Eli Phillips, Jesse Sowell, William Burch, Wm. H. Ham- 
ner, Aaron Yarbrough, Josiah Wiseman, Nathan Riley, James B. Bad- 
gett and Azariah Williams. 

Since the Civil War days we have had many faithful and loyal 
men, who have labored within the bounds of the association, some of 
them have been, H. Morton, H. W. Reinhart, J. H. Owen, Thomas Car- 
rick, A. P. Stoker, S. F. Conrad, J. M. Bennett, J. H. Hillard, John R. 
Miller and M. L. Kesler. 

The labors of these and many others in the association have been 
just as fruitful and as loyal to the denomination, as that of the early 
history characters, which we have mentioned, but we do not have time 
to go into their work at length. 

During its history the associaiton has had 19 Moderators and ten 
clerks. The late James Smith, of Lexington, has the distinction of 
having held the place of Moderator over the longest period of years. 
He served for 19 consecutive years. Henry Sheets served much longer 
than any other person as clerk, he held this position for 30 consecu- 
tive years and later was clerk again for four years. 

For 41 years commencing in 1877 Henry Sheets was an official of 
the body except for two years in 1907 and 1908 when he was neither 
clerk nor moderator, during these 41 years he also preached the Intro- 
ductory Sermon five times. The second clerk of the body was Azariah 
Williams, who lived about two miles out from Lexington on the Wins- 
ton-Salem road. He served for 22 years, from 1842 to 1864. 

James Smith was the first layman to serve as Moderator. Since 
him three other laymen have served in that office. 

It would be interesting to go into some of the old customs and 
styles practiced in the association, but we will pass with the relation 
of one incident. In the old days many of the churches had tall and 
boxed pulpits. 

Once upon a time at a certain church in the association, which 
had one of these old pulpits, a stranger was invited to preach. He was 
short of statute, he was the first person to arrive at the church. He 
went inside and behind the old tall and boxed pulpit, and busied him- 
self studying his sermon. The congregation came in seated them- 



38 



MINUTES OF THE 



selves, no preacher was to be seen, they began talking about his fail- 
ure to come, when suddenly he arose — only his head to be seen, and 
announced his, test "It is I, be not afraid." 

As before stated seven small churches or parts of churches were 
rejected by the Abbotts Creek Union Association in 1832 because 
among other things they stood for missions. 

But when we look at the small amounts raised for missions in the 
early days of the association, we would think that they would not have 
been very objectionable from a missionary standpoint. 

But no great structure was ever built in a day's time. Slowly 
but surely the association has built, lets notice some reports made 
at its annual sessions in former days. 

Members reported in 1832,, 188; in 1835, 661; in 1845, 588; a loss of 
73 over a ten-year period, in 1855, 793, 620 whites and 173 colored. In 
1866, 909, 653 whites and 256 colored. In 1875, 1,299; In 1885, 1,663; of 
which 1,033 were females and 593 males, and 37 colored members, 
which were mostly females. In 1895, 2,372; of which 1,483 were females 
and 889 males. No colored members were reported in that year. In 
1905, 2,227 of which 1,380 were females and 847 males, we find here a 
net loss of 35 over the ten-year period from 1895 to 1905. In 1915 we 
had a membership of 3,159, of which 1,913 were females and 1,246 
males. In 1931 our total membership was 6,065. It is interesting to 
note that while the female and male membership was listed separately 
the females outnumbered the males almost 2 to 1. 

In the examination of old minutes we find very little or nothing 
being given for missions and outside objects before 1855. In that year 
we find the churches of the association reported to its annual session 
the sum of $22.50 raised for missions and all outside objects. In 1875 
we find the amount raised for these objects was $70.47. We pass over 
a period of ten years and find that in 1885 the churches only raised 
$44.10 for these objects. We do not know the reason for this decrease 
but we do know that during that period, one of the churches of the 
association, one of the original seven; had gone anti -missionary and 
finally disbanded a few years later. This seems to have been the 
dawn just before the break of day. In 1895 we find the churches 
raised for missions and outside objects the sum of $1,886.57; in 1905, 
$2,752.66; In 1915, $10,763.91; in 1931, nearly $18,000.00. 

The churches of the association paid their pastors very little dur- 
ing the first 50 years of its history. 

We find little or no record of how mucn was paid them before the 
year 1885. In that year the total paid pastors was $925.33. At that 
time the churches at High Point and Salisbury were members of the 
Liberty Assoication; and they paid $182.58 of the $925.33. In 1895 the 
amount paid pastors was $2,582.00; High Point Church was still in the 
association and paid $650.00 of this, the church at Lexington paid its 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



39 



pastor $575.13 that year. During the next ten years there must have 
been a "depression," because we find in 1905 the total amount paid for 
pastor's salary was $2,476.23 a net loss of $115.77, but during this time 
the High Point church had joined the Piedmont Association. 

Pastors were paid $4,699.22 in 1915; and in 1931 the sum of 
$19,478.13. 

The total amount raised for all purposes in any one year previous 
to 1885 probably was not over $1,000.00. In 1895 the total for all pur- 
poses was $4,468.57, in 1905, $5,228.89 in 1915, $15,436.13, in 1930 $60,- 
429.32. The association was 85 years old before its total gifts in any 
single year amounted to $15,000.00, but 15 years later we find it raised 
more than four times this much in a single year. 

It required 85 years to reach a total membership of 3,000, but dur- 
ing the past fifteen years we have more than doubled this. Let us 
thank God for our numbers and pray Him that we all may be conse- 
crated to his cause. 

SAM J. SMITH, 
For the Committee. 

26. Rev. J. M. Hayes, Pastor First Church Lexington 
read the report of the Executive Committee, on motion to 
adopt it was discussed by Rev. Hayes and was adopted. 

REPORT ON EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Your Committee makes the following report: 

Upon application from Sheets Memorial Church for aid on pas- 
tor's salary, recommendation was made to the General Board that 
such aid be granted. We are glad to report that the requested help 
was given by the Board. We are happy to know that the work of this 
new church, under the leadership of its faithful and efficient pastor, 
Brother Walter Wafford continues to go forward with marked prog- 
ress. The church was organized two years ago with a membership of 
about thirty. They now have one hundred and seventy-eight mem- 
bers, and a Sunday School attendance of more than two hundred. 

Your committee joined in trying to lend encouragement towards 
making the Every Member Canvass a success in the churches last 
year. We sent a letter, also, urging every pastor and superintendent 
to do their best in leading their church and Sunday School to make a 
liberal Thanksgiving offering for the Mills Home. 

Recommendations 

1. We recommend that special effort be made in every church to 
put on a thorough Every Member Canvass this year. We believe that 
this is the best way, perhaps the only way, out of the distressing situa- 
tion confronting our churches and our great denomination. It is 
neither a campaign nor a drive. It is just simply an undertaking to 
enlist every member of every church to practice God's plan of financ- 



40 



MINUTES OF THE 



ing Kingdom work in both the church and denomination. It is cer- 
tainly Scriptural for every member is urged to give the tithe as the 
minimum, and to bring his gift every week into the Lord's storehouse, 
the church. If we approve tithing, as Jesus did (Matt. 23:23), and be- 
lieve in the method of bringing our gifts to the church taught us by 
Paul (I Cor. 16:2), surely we cannot find Scriptural grounds for ob- 
jecting to the every member canvass as the nearest approach to God's 
plan of financing His work through the churches. We are persuaded 
that God's plan is our only hope of salvation from utter collapse and 
dismal failure in this hour when we are unable to pay our debts and 
to support our workers. Our Foreign Mission Board has recently noti- 
fied thirty-two of our missionaries at home on furlough that they can- 
not be sent back because of the continued falling off of receipts with 
which to carry on the work. And who knows but that the Board will 
have to call some of our missionaries now on the field back home? 
How we feel the sting of this situation when we think of our own 
Brother Gallimore and his family, who are with us now, and to whom 
word has just come from the Foreign Mission Board that they cannot 
go back to the work in China to which they have given 14 years of 
their life. If we fail our Lord in giving His Gospel to the nations of 
the earth, how can we expect His blessings to be continued upon us? 

2. That we designate the Sunday before Thanksgiving as "Kesler 
Memorial Day," and that the pastor and superintendent of every 
church prepare a fitting memorial service that will do honor to the 
memory of our great leader who has gone to enjoy his reward for the 
faithful life he so nobly lived. We believe that such a service will in- 
spire our people to make the largest Thanksgiving offering for our 
great orphanage we have ever made. 

3. That we enter upon the beginning of the second century of 
the organization of the Liberty Association with an ever increasing 
feeling of appreciation for what our forefathers so nobly achieved in 
the century just come to its close, and, with increased devotion and 
undying hope, we "press on toward the mark for the prize of the high 
calling of God in Christ Jesus, always looking unto Jesus the author 
and finisher of our faith." Respectful iy submit ted, 

JAMES M. HAYES, 
For the Committee. 

26. The Association adjourned at 12 :30 P. M. 

Wednesday Afternoon Session 

27. The body reconvened at 1 :30 P. M. 

28. The devotional was conducted by Rev. Arthur 
Gallimore, missionary to China. 

29. Rev. M. 0. Alexander, pastor First church, 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



41 



Thomasville read the report on State of the Churches, af- 
ter motion to adopt, the report was discussed by Rev. 
Alexander, Rev. R. L. West, Rev. G. A. Martin and others 
and is adopted. 

REPORT ON STATE OF CHURCHES 

In spite of many things that might have prevented the Liberty 
Baptist Association of twenty-six churches has gone forward on sure 
foundations. There has been no high pressure methods, either in 
finance or evangelistic efforts, but most of our churches have made 
real progress on permanent bases. Today we are about $1,000.00 ahead 
in our gifts to missions of what we were at this time last year, to me, 
this is certain evidence of real progress. May the day soon come when 
our zeal shall burst into flame for the great mission of Christ and to 
carry out His commission. 

The First Church of Lexington has given about twice as much this 
year to missions as it gave in the flourishing years of 1926 and 1927, 
proving the worth of able, sincere and wise leadership. Most of our 
churches have made similar progress and we have good reasons to 
rejoice. 

We deem it wise, in view of the above paragraph, to caution our 
churches to be prayerfully careful in selecting pastors, and leaders. 
There are some of the nineteen pastors of our churches who deprive 
us of their presence, fellowship and counsel in our associational meet- 
ings, this ought not to be. 

Lick Creek has used her losses of last year to thrust herself for- 
ward and has gained twenty-five years I think and made herself per- 
manent, and has today an equipment far surpassing any in her long 
and useful history. 

Grand Hill has built a new and beautiful church house adequate 
for her work for many years to come, this church is to be commended 
for her faith and energy. 

Now I could not be true to myself nor to our cause if I did not 
call to your attention the fact that Westfield, Walters Grove and Tay- 
lors Grove need special attention by this body and above all, these 
churches with some faithful members in them need our help. 

I commend to you pastors, our monthly pastors conference, to 
the whole body our Union meetings on Friday before the fifth Sunday. 
Dr. M. L. Kesler has said to me more than once, that these meetings 
of the pastors and Union meetings of the people have put us far ahead 
of many associations of equal ability. 

By simple faith and honest work shall we in prayer make progress 
in things eternal. M . Q . ALEXANDER. 



30. Rev. Walter L. Wafford, pastor of Sheets Me- 



42 



MINUTES OF THE 



morial Church read the report on B. Y. P. XL's; on motion 
to adopt it was discussed by Mr. Wafford, and was 
adopted. 

REPORT ON R. Y. P. U. 

The seventh annual session of the Liberty Baptist Associational 
B. Y. P. U. Convention was held with the First Baptist Church, Lex- 
ington, N. C, August 26, 1932. There was an unusual attendance, and 
a marked interest in the work of the B. Y. P. U. As a whole the con- 
vention was very encouraging, and, I believe, points toward increased 
activity and interest in the work of the B. Y. P. U. 

During the past year our work has made some gain in the organ- 
ization of new unions, and the enlistment of new members. One adult 
union has been organized making a total of three Adult Unions in the 
Association. Two Senior Unions have been organized, making a total 
of 18; one Intermediate Union has been organized making a total of 
12 unions; 5 Junior Unions have been organized making a total of 17 
unions. We have at present 50 unions in the Association. The total 
enrollment has gained during the year from 891 to 991, an even gain 
of 100. 

In spite of the fine work that is being done in the B. Y. P. U.'s 
of the Association, we have not yet more than begun. We have en- 
rolled in the Junior department of our Sunday Schools, 1,040 pupils, 
more than we have in all our B. Y. P. U. work combined. We have 
enrolled Jin the Intermediate department of our Sunday Schools 991, 
nearly as many as in all our B. Y. P. U. work combined. We have in 
the Young People's department of our Sunday Schools 1,179 pupils, 
more than in all our B. Y. P. U. work combined. We have enrolled in 
the Adult department of our Sunday Schools 1,491. At least half of 
these are definite prospects for the Adult Union. Counting only half 
of the Adults enrolled in Sunday School as definite prospects for the 
B. A. U. we have in our Sunday Schools 3,910 prospects for B. Y. P. 
U. while only 991 of this number is enlisted in the work. What a 
challenge for enlistment. 

What a challenge this field offers for enlistment. Oh, may we 
all realize our opportunity, and may we work and pray that the time 
may soon come when every church shall maintain a B. Y. P. U., and 
the majority of our young people are enlisted in this great work. 

31. The report on Christian Education, prepared by- 
Rev. C. R. Johnson, pastor of Tabernacle Church was read 
by R. D. Covington, which after motion to adopt was dis- 
cussed by Rev. Arthur R. Gallimore and was adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

What are Southern Baptists doing in the field of education? 
Roger Babson, the far famed statistician says: "The need of the hour 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



43 



is not more factories or materials, nor more railroads or steamships, 
not more armies or navies, but rather more education based on the 
plain teaching of Jesus. When our country calls in time of war, we 
are willing to give our property, our time and even our lives; yet the 
call of Christian Education is of even greater importance than even 
the call of the army or navy. It is estimated that there are 16,000,000 
people in the South who come under our Baptist influence and re- 
sponsibility, who have not yet been reached for any kind of definite 
religious instruction and guidance through our churches. What a host 
of unreached possibilities. These people rightly belong to our Baptist 
constituency in the South. In the method of Jesus, preaching and 
teaching went hand in hand. We need to preach far and wide and 
hold all the revival meetings we can, but along with this must go a 
serious and enthusiastic effort to train and enlist those who may be 
reached. 

The great purpose of religious education for the masses is to so 
teach the Bible and the message of the Christian religion that boys 
and girls, and men and women, will learn, accept, and live this mes- 
sage. We must think of "Christian Education" in broader terms than 
heretofore. If our civilization is to rest upon the principles of Christ's 
teachings, then we must have Christian schools. We cannot have 
Christian schools without the support of Christian people. If we Bap- 
tists believe, therefore, in Christian Education, we must have Chris- 
tian schools. We must give more emphasis to the Christian Education 
of the masses of the people all the way "from the cradle to the grave." 
The term "Christian Education" should include all the educational 
agencies of the local churches as well as our schools, colleges and 
seminaries. 

In a broader and richer sense of the term then, why not have 
"Christian Education" for all our people? Why do we not as a de- 
nomination, and through our local churches, move forward into a big- 
ger and better program for providing Christian education for all our 
people? First. Because we have not seen the need and caught the 
visions. Second. The lack of trained workers. Third. The lack of 
adequate financial support. Fourth. The difficulty of reaching the 
people. We must "go into the highways and hedges, and constrain 
them to come in. We must, and we shall,, have a better vision and a 
more adequate program. The teaching method is central in the pro- 
motion of the Christian religion. It has been from the beginning and 
always will be. At the heart of the great commission is the teaching 
method, for "make disciples" and "teaching" are both educational 
terms, with emphasis on the educational method. And so we must 
pray and work not only to provide real Christian education for "all 
the children of all the people" but for all the people as well, till Christ 
comes again and his Kingdom prevails in all the earth. 

C. R. JOHNSON. 



44 



MINUTES OF THE 



32. The report on Ministerial Relief by Rev. H. T. 
Penry, pastor at Holloways, Liberty and Stoners Grove 
was adopted and the subject was discussed by Hugh F. 
Latimer, Eastern Representative of the Relief and An- 
nuity Board. 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF AND ANNUITIES 

The achievements of the Relief and Annuity Board since its or- 
ganization, fourteen years ago, are notable and worthy. More and 
more our people are realizing that our Southern Baptist Convention 
made no mistake when it launched this new work. It is still so new 
that most of our people know but little about it. Hence we think it 
well to present in this report the salient facts contained in the Board's 
report to the Convention at St. Petersburg, Florida, in May last. 

First, The Board paid during 1931 benefits totaling $211,017.59. 
Of this sum $132,356.41 was paid to Relief Beneficiaries and $78,661.18 
was paid to participants in the Annuity Department. 

Second, There were 1,514 ministers, missionaries, widows, and or- 
phans aided through the Relief Department, and 211 ministers, mis- 
sionaries, widows, and orphans who received annuities. Total number 
receiving benefits, 1,725. (150 orphans included in these figures do 
not receive direct help.) 

Third, The Benefits in the Relief Department were reduced in 
March of this year from $132,000.00 to $100,000.00. This was due to the 
inability of the Board to make up the lack of gifts from the churches 
from its reserve. The Relief Reserve has been completely exhausted 
and heavy drafts have been made upon the small earnings reserve. 
No more reduction in reserves can be made. 

Fourth, The Relief and Annuity Board is supposed to receive 7 per 
cent of South- wide benevolences. Only 3% per cent of the gifts of 
our people for South-wide causes actually gets to the Relief and An- 
nuity Board. This is due to the fact that so many of our people 
designate their gifts and so little money is designated to this cause. 
The Board in its report pleads for a more equitable division of gifts. 

Fifth, The present membership in the Annuity Fund, (old) is 
1,499. Of these 1,288 are active or paying members, 122 are age and 
disability annuitants. There are also 78 widows and seven orphans 
receiving annuities. There are four special annuitants who paid in 
full for the annuities they now draw. The total sum to be paid in 
annuities during 1932 is estimated at $100,000.00, and the number of 
annuitants is expected to reach 225 during the year. 

Sixth, The new form of annuity contract, styled the SERVICE 
ANNUITY has begun to be issued. The Board inaugurated this new 
plan on January 27th, and made the same retroactive to January 1st, 
1932. The membership is small but is sure to grow to large propor- 
tions. There is a growing interest among preachers and laymen in 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



45 



this plan. Already more than 1,500 preachers have agreed to enter 
the plan when their churches are ready to join them. The beginning 
which has been made in times of great depression is a distinct victory 
and this beginning is on an actuarially sound basis. 

Seventh, The Board's assets as of December 31st, 1931, were $3,- 
844,667.20. There are additional resources from which the earnings 
are being sent regularly to the Board of approximately $160,000.00. 
Thus the total resources are over $4,000,000.00. The bulk of these re- 
sources are in the Annuity Department. 

Eighth, The business affairs of the Board are carefully handled 
by Committees on which are able business and professional men re- 
siding in Dallas, Texas. Its funds are invested in sound securities in 
which there has been practically no default either in interest or 
principal. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. T. PENRY. 

33. The report of the Committee on Obituaries was 
read by Rev. S. B. Wilson, pastor of the Summerville and 
Lick Creek Churches. The report was adopted, and Mr. 
Wilson payed a brief tribute of respect to those whose 
names it contains. 

34. Miss Sallie McCracken, read a Memorial to Dr. M. 
L. Kesler, who was killed in an accident a few days ago; 
and who had been General Manager of the Mills Home for 
27 years and active in the deliberations of this body for 

the same period. The memorial was adopted and ordered 
printed in the minutes. 

M. L. KESLER 

Martin Luther Kesler was born in Iredell County, August 25, 1858. 
His father was Charles W. Kesler who had married Elizabeth Keziah 
Lazenby. Other children in this family were John Louis, Minnie, 
Mary and Margery. He joined New Hope church which has sent out 
a number of leading Baptists. 

He was educated at Moravian Falls Academy which was under the 
charge of Rev. George W. Greene, afterward a missionary to China 
for many years. From there he went to Wake Forest where he grad- 
uated in 1888, then to the Seminary at Louisville and took the degree 
of Master of Theology. Wake Forest conferred on him the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity in 1916. Mr. Kesler did some associational mission 
work in South Carolina and while engaged in this work he met Miss 
Ethel Browne, of Aiken, whom he afterward married in 1892. The 
three sons of Mr. and Mrs. Kesler are J. M. and J. C. of Winston- 
Salem, and M. L., Jr., of Newark, N. J. 



DR. M. L. KESLER 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



47 



Mr. Kesler has served the following churches as pastor: Laurin- 
burg, Spring Hill, High Point, Rocky Mount, Scotland Neck and Mor- 
ganton . From the latter place he was called to be General Manager 
of the Thcmasville Baptist Orphanage in 1905. He had been a trustee 
of this institution for nearly ten years before he was chosen as its 
head. This, along with the varied experiences of the past years 
fitted him well for the position which he assumed on September 1, 
1905, and remained until August 19, 1932, when returning from some 
associations in the west his car collided with a freight train in 
Thcmasville and he was instantly killed. He did a monumental work 
at the orphanage. The name of the institution was changed to Mills 
Home during his administration, the grounds and farm much im- 
proved, many new buildings erected and the number of children cared 
for greatly increased. He has been a leader in Child Welfare work, 
not only in North Carolina, but throughout the South, and his in- 
fluence extended even farther for he was one of the directors of the 
Child Welfare League of America. He was the pioneer in Mothers Aid 
work in North Carolina, having made it one of the departments of 
the Mills Home before the State Board of Charities and Public Wel- 
fare entered on this field. He served as trustee of Wake Forest Col- 
lege, Meredith College, Baptist Hospital; director of the State School 
for the Blind and of the Child Welfare League of America; member 
of the Board of Education of Davidson County, of the State Board of 
Missions and of the Southern Baptist Assembly. He had been chosen 
President of the Thcmasville Rotary Club a few weeks previous to his 
death. 

When Mr. Kesler moved into the bounds of the Liberty Associa- 
tion he joined heartily in the work and has been a great factor in the 
upbuilding and advancement of Kingdom interests. His tragic death 
has thrown a pall over our association. He was chairman of the pro- 
gram committee for the Centennial celebration and nobody was look- 
ing forward to this meeting with more joyous anticipation than he. 
One of the newspapers has given us a beautiful and true picture of 
him: 

"He lived his religion daily and his walk was with God. His going 
was tragic, sudden, in the dark night, but he was ready and died in 
the line of duty as much as any soldier ever died on a battlefield — a 
gentleman unafraid." 

35. Rev. E. F. Mumford offers the following resolu- 
tion, which is adopted. 

RESOLUTION OF THANKS 

Resolved: That we hereby extend to the pastor, Rev. J. M. Hayes 
and the members of the First Baptist Church, Lexington, N. C, and 



48 



MINUTES OF THE 



the people of this city our sincere thanks and gratitude for their 
gracious entertainment and hospitality during the sessions of this as- 
sociation. 

And that we also thank them for the v use of their church and 
equipment for the present session. 

E. F. MUMFORD. 

36. Rev, J. A. McMillan made a motion that the body- 
pay the expenses of Dr. J. Clyde Turner and Dr. W. L. 
Poteat incurred in attending the Association. The motion 
was adopted. 

37. The 'Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 
made their report which was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 
FOR 1933 

Place : Lick Creek, High Rock, N. C. 
Time : Tuesday and Wednesday after the First Sunday 
in September, 1933. 

Preacher: Rev. E. F. Mumford, Wallburg, N. C. 
Alternate: Rev. E. C. Roach, Rt. 3, Lexington, N. C. 

FOR SPRING SESSION 
Time: April 28th, 1933, (Friday before the 5th Sunday 
in April.) 

Place : Liberty, Thomasville, N. C, R. F. D. No. 3. 
Preacher : Rev. Walter L. Waf f ord, Lexington, N. C. 

38. The Association votes to include in the minutes of 
this session the proceedings of the Associational Meeting 
of the W. M. U. held with the church at Mills Home on 
April 27th, 1932. 

39. Rev. J. A. McMillan makes motion that the De- 
nominational Program suggested for the period of Sep- 
tember 5, 1932 to January 1, 1936 be submitted to the 
churches of the Association for their serious considera- 
tion. The motion was adopted. 

40. Sam J. Smith read the report as Treasurer of the 
body. The report was adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
FOR YEAR ENDING AUGUST 31, 1932 



Abbotts Creek 
Center Hill . . . 



RECEIPTS 



$ 6.00 
2.00 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 49 



Churchland 6.50 

Denton 6.50 

Gravel Hill '., 1.10 

Holloways 3.00 

Jersey • • 3.20 

Lexington 26.00 

Liberty 4.00 

Lick Creek 2.00 

New Friendship • • 5.52 

Mills Home 12.50 

Reeds 5.00 

Rich Fork • • 5.00 

Smith Grove 4.00 

Southside 3.00 

Stoners Grove 6.00 

Summerville • 3.25 

Tabernacle 7.00 

Taylors Grove 1.00 

Thomasville 16.00 

Wallburg 5.00 

Walters Grove • 00 

Welcome 3.50 

Westfield • . 3.00 

Sheets Memorial 5.00 

Carolina Avenue • • 3.00 



Total Receipts .$148.07 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Economy Printing Co., Printing Minutes ....$ 97.94 

Express on Minutes 2.06 

Paid Charity and Children, for programs 1.50 

Lexington Book & Stationery Co., for cardboard .75 

Phone calls 1.75 

Postage 6.80 

Balance due Clerk on 1931 account 11.63 

Sam J. Smith for service as clerk 25.64 

Total disbursements $148.07 

Balance due Sam J. Smith, clerk-. $ 4.36 

SAM. J. SMITH, 

Treasurer. 

Pine Knot Mission 

41. Rev. S. B. Wilson read a request from Summer- 
ville Church and workers at Pine Knot School House, that 



50 



MINUTES OF THE 



the work at that place be recognized by the Association 
as a mission of the Summerville Church. 

Upon motion of Rev. Wilson it was voted by the body 
to grant the request, and it was also voted that hereafter 
the Summerville Church make a report of the work to the 
Association in their church letter to the body. 

Work shown as having been done at Pine Knot last year 
is as follows : 

Sunday School organized with a membership of 68, 
average attendance 49. Money raised for revivals $48.00. 
Two additions recommended to the churches at Summer- 
ville and Holloways. 

Carlie Carrick, Supt. of Sunday Schools, Rev. S. B. Wil- 
son, Supply Pastor. 

42. Song, "God be With You Until We Meet Again." 
Prayer, by Rev. R. N. Honeycutt, pastor of the Jersey 
Church. 

The Association adjourned at 3 :45 P. M. 



SAM J. SMITH, 

Clerk. 



G. W. MILLER, 

M oderator. 



IN REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE, WHO HAVE ANSWERED 
THE ROLL CALL SINCE OUR LAST ASSOCIATION 



"In My Father's House Are Many Mansions." 



ABBOTTS CREEK: 

Mrs. Ella Blanch Hine 
CENTER HILL: 

Mr. J. V. Palmer 
CHURCHLAND: 

Deacon W. A. Beeker 

Mr. William Wilson 
DENTON: 

Mr. A. H. Gallimore 

Rev. J. L. Shinn 
HOLLO WAYS: 

Mrs. Josie Wall 
JERSEY: 

Mrs. Jennie Kepley 
LEXINGTON: 

Mr. Tom S. Cross 

Mr. Ruffin Redwine 

Deacon W. B. Tucker 

Mrs. J. M. Daniel 

Mrs. Jane Broadway 

Mr. Baxter Shemwell 
LIBERTY: 

Mrs. Susan Dorsett 

Mrs. Jane Cashatt 

Miss Flora Lambeth 
LICK CREEK: 

Mr. J. M. Stafford 
MILLS HOME: 

Dr. M. L. Kesler 

Miss Alice Rudd 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: 

Mrs. Alma Burton Whirlow 

Mr. Dannie C. Swaim 



REEDS: 

Mrs. C. W. Benson 

Mr. T. E. Michael 
RICH FORK: 

William A. Clinard 

Mrs. Emma Kanoy 
SHEETS MEMORIAL: 

Mrs. Martha Byars 
SMITH GROVE: 

Mr. Floyd S. Young 
STONERS GROVE: 

Mrs. C. L. Long 

TABERNACLE: 

Mr. R. J. McGinn 

Mr. W. P. Hawkins 
TAYLORS GROVE: 

Mrs. M. A. Bailey 
THOMASVILLE: 

Deacon W. G. Fitzgerald 

Deacon Monroe Bean 

Mrs. Mary Kearns 

Mrs. A. D. Green 

Mrs. D. N. Godby 

Mrs. Martha Russell 

Mr. M. S. Stone 
WELCOME: 

Mrs. M. L. Craver 

Mrs. J. W. May 

WESTFIELD: 
Two reported but no names 
given. 

S. B. WILSON, 
EARL L. BRADLEY, 
C. H. TEAGUE, 
Committee on Obituaries. 



52 



MINUTES OF THE 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 
NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist As- 
sociation/' 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this association to furnish the 
gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the associa- 
tion, and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the asso- 
ciation, pastors of the churches in the association, and messengers 
from the churches. Each church shall be entitled to three messengers 
and one additional messenger for every 50 members or fraction there- 
of over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, 
vice-moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected 
each year by the association at its annual meeting and shall hold 
office until their successors are elected. The duties of the officers 
shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in like organiza- 
tions, or as defined by the association from time to time. 

BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee each 
year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel preached 
in all parts of the association, and to attend to all business in the 
association between the sessions and to make such reports as they 
deem advisable at the annual meeting of the association. The asso- 
ciation may appoint or elect such other boards or committees from 
time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The association shall meet annually, on Tuesday after 
the first Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request 
of the Executive Committee change the time or the place of meeting 
of this association when it may be deemed by him not expedient to 
meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive Com- 
mittee may fill any vacancy occurring between meetings of the asso- 
ciation. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular ses- 
sion of the association by a two-thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules of 
Order for Parliamentary Authority. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



53 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



WHERE HELD 



Uamestown 
Hollo ways 1 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting H 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Greek 
Reeds X Roads 

3Big Creek 

Uamestown 
Liberty 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3Big Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Greek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

Summervil'le 

Lexington 

Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H. 

High Point 

Kernersville 

Holloways 

Pleasant Grove 

Denton 
5Piney Grove 

Rich Fork 

Abbott's Creek 

Reeds X Roads 



PREACHER 



Geo. W. Purefoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eii Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Eli Carroll 
Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 

Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P.'Stocker 
Wim. Turner 
W. M. Wdngate 
H. Morton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. F. Redd 
C. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H. Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 
J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J, K. Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 



MODERATOR 



Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eii Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tuessey 
Sidney Lamer 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
H. Morton 
Wm. Turner 
Wm, Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 



CLERK 



Peter Owen 
x-eiar Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah AViiliams 
by Civil War 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



54 



MINUTES OF THE 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Year 


WHERE HELD 


PREACHER 


MODERATOR 


CLE] 




1901 




C. A. G. Thomas 


T n vn pc Q m i + V» 
J ctlllco oi Iltl III 


Henry She 




1902 


| X-illV_-lY 1 CCA. 


Henry Sheets 


O C-IllC/O OI11I1 LAI 


Henry She 


et 


1903 


1 Tnrcpv 


W. A. Smith 


U CllllCo OHlli LI1 


Henry Sheet ! 


1904 


[ 9 p i n a Mpptincr W 
| __Jriilt7 IVXtitJ LIll^ XI. 

| xNcW X 1 I 1 till U. oil 1L/ 


flpn P T-farrill 

UCU. -L . X-LO.1 1 111 


J a m e s Smii t h 


Henry Sneetl 


1905 


lohn "R MillPir 

UKJUIL 11. XVJ.liJ.Ci. 


James Srniith 


Henry She 




1906 


r JT Tro ni a^s v il 1 6 


J. S. Farmer 


TPITYIPCJ STTliltVl 
J allies L_- lJ itii.il 


Henry Sheet' 


1907 


V V CL 1 1 U Ul g 


Dr. R. T. Vann 


*J • VV . v VV Cll 


P. S. Vann 1 


1908 




1M. L. jKesler 


T W NnwpTI 

*J • VV. i^U WC11 


P. S. Vann 1 


1909 


j Liberty 


S. D. Swain 


T^T pt~it*v £n Vi p p 1 a 


P. S. Vann 'I 


1910 


OiTTi'Vi ana p^p 


O. A. Keller 


T-T p y\ T* V J**' ilAAtS 

llCliJ- kJllCCLo 


P. S. Vann i 


1911 


| ^lUUUC'to C/l CCJ\ 


G A. IMartin 


11C111 ^ OllCC Li3 


P. S. Vann 


1912 


KJ 1 LU1IC1 o vjj i <_j v t; 




X-J pvifV Q Vl P P' t Q 

iiciii uiicc to 


P. S. Vann ! 


1913 


| 1V1C11 X C^ 1 JV 


M„ L. Kesler 


T-T pnrv 5>Ti p P' f q 


P. S. Vann 


1914 


T— T o 1 1 r\ wt a vs 

| XXU11U W Ct jr O 


G. A.. iMartin 


d A 1VT artin 

V_T. XV__CL'A L11A 


Henry Sheet 


1915 


1 Center Hill 


O." A." Keller 


O. A. Keller 


Henry Sheet! 


1916 


"\A7"'i3 1 1 hn rcr 

| > V C--A.1 U 


I. M. Mercer 




Henry Sheet'i 


1917 


S mi 't'li G^rove 


Ered D. Hale 


R. S. Green 


Henry Sheet! 


1918 


Lexington 


M. L. Kesler 


R." s! Green 


Archibald 


J- 


1919 


| Denton 


R. E. White 


R. S. Green 


Archibald 


J. 


1920 


| New Friendship 


J. S. Hardaway 


R. S. Green 


Archibald 


J- 


1921 


| Cliurchland 


M. L. Kesler 


R. S. Green 


Archibald 


J 


1922 


Summervii'lle 


W. A. Hough 


R. S. Green 


Paul C. New! 


1923 


] Abbotts' Creek 


W. L. Barrs 


Archibald Johnson 


Paul C. New; 


1924 


| Reeds 


C. H. Trueblood 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smit) 


1925 


1 Liberty 


C. A. Owens 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smitl i 


1927 


| Thomasville 


E. N. Gardner 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Srr 


it' 


1928 


j HoJloways 


H. T. Penry 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smit:, 


1929 


| Stoners Grove 


M. Li. Kesler 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smit: 


1930 


Abbotts Creek 


J. M. Hayes 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Smitl' 


1931 


I Denton 


M. Li , Kesler 


Archibald Johnson 


Sam J. Sir 


it: 


1926 


1 Rich Fork 


M. O. Alexander 


G. Wilson Miller 


Sam J. Smitl' 


1932 


| Lexington 


G. A. Martin 


G. Wilson Miller 


Sam J. Smit! 1 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Chunchland ; 3 Now Eldorado; 
4 Now Clemmonsviiie ; 5 Now Waliburg". 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



55 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE W. M. U. 

of the 

LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

The Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Asso- 
ciation held its twenty-sixth annual session with the so- 
ciety of the Mills Home Church on April 27, 1932. The 
meeting was called to order by the Superintendent, Miss 
Sallie L. McCracken, at ten o'clock. The opening hymn, 
"Jesus Shall Reign," was sung, after which the devotional 
was conducted by Mrs. M. 0. Alexander, of Thomasville. 
She brought to mind many different virtues of a number 
of women mentioned in the Bible, whose lives were 
worthy of emulation. A vocal solo, "Man of Sorrows," 
was rendered by Mrs. C. J. Stone of Thomasville. Mrs. 
I. P. Frazier gave the visitors a very hearty welcome to 
which Miss Elma Cornatzer, of Smith Grove, responded 
in a few well chosen words. Further words of welcome 
were spoken by the local pastor, Rev. J. A. McMillan, and 
also by Miss McCracken, who said that even the flowers 
were blooming in the W. M. U. colors for the occasion, as 
a massive bouquet of lavender and white attested. 

The roll call of the societies was then taken up and 
most all of the societies responded with good reports. 
Reports of officers were given as follows : 

TREASURER'S REPORT 



Balance in treasury January 1, 1931 $21.67 

Collected during year 29.00 

Total $50.67 

DISBURSEMENTS 

May 2, W. M. U. Programs $ 2.00 

May 2, Postage 5.00 

May 30, Miss McCracken Traveling Expenses 25.00 

June 1, Miss Lazenby for Exp. Charlotte Div 5.00 

Total $37.00 

Balance December 31, 1931 $13.67 



The report of the Mission Study Chairman, Mrs. W. J. 
Griffin, showed that mission study work had been done 
in a number of the societies and that 118 certificates, 26 
record cards, and 123 seals had been given. 

Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, the Personal Service Chairman 
gave her report which showed a large number of services 
of various kinds that had been rendered. 

Mrs. C. R. Redwine, the Young People's Leader, re- 



56 



MINUTES OF THE 



ported some important work done among the young peo- 
ple namely the beginning of ten new organizations. 

Our Superintendent, Miss McCracken, gave an unusual 
ly encouraging report. She spoke of many things tha 
had been accomplished during the past year : 56 societie 
enlisted; 7 new societies organized; 6 societies visited; 
241 letters and postals written; 1,531 miles traveled; 
$829.41 contributed through our societies for payment o 
the convention debt; 7 full graded unions, and in one th 
G. A. is supporting a missionary in China; $6,074.59 
credited us on Miss Hunter's report, which was far above 
our quota. A round table conference was then held by 
Mrs. Edna R. Harris, our State Corresponding Secretary 
of Raleigh. Many questions were discussed and an 
swered. 

The different committees were then appointed, afte 
which the Mills Home choir rendered an anthem. Rev. 
C. R. Johnson offered the closing prayer at the time o~ 
adjournment for the noon hour. 

Afternoon Session 
After re-assembling, the devotional was given by Mrs. 
K. D. Stukenbrok, of Spencer, who used John 15:1-17 a~ 
her scripture selection and offered prayer. 

An interesting hour with the Mills Home Young Peo- 
ple's Societies was profitably spent. A playlet, "Why 
Some Dollies Went as Missionaries," was rendered by the 
Sunbeams. The scripture and song period was conducted 
by the Miles Durham Nursery children. Another play- 
let, "Aunt Margaret's Tenth," was given by a group of 
young people. Three girls dressed appropriately, repre- 
sented the Three Sisters, Royal Service, Training School, 
and Y, W. A., each of whom is celebrating her 25th birth- 
day anniversary. 

Mrs. Edna R. Harris called attention to the steward- 
ship declamation contest, which is held annually. Mrs. 
Harris then gave an inspiring address. Her subject was 
"The Five Doors." 

Mrs. George Green, a missionary to Africa, brought to 
us an impressive message about the people of the Dark 
Continent. In closing she spoke beautifully of how side 
by side, the missionary, the one who hears, and the one 
who sends may together lay their sheaves at the feet of 
the Master. 

The reports of the committees were given as follows: 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



57 



NOMINATIONS 

Superintendent Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 

Assistant Superintendent Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 

Secretary Treasurer - Mrs. M. M. Smith, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Junior Superintendent Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Lexington, N. C. 

Mission Study Leader Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Personal Service Chairman .. Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Thomasville, N. C. 

The nominating committee was composed of Mrs. J. M. Hayes, 
Mrs. Will Johnson, and Mrs. Alda Craver. 

TIME AND PLACE 

The committee composed of Mrs. A. P. Warfford, Mrs. J. B. Mot- 
singer, and Mrs. N. G. Goodin decided on Wallburg Church and 
Thursday after the third Sunday in April for the 1933 meeting. 

The courtesy committee which was composed of Miss Roxie 
Sheets, Mrs. C. R. Johnson and Mrs. E. R. Lanning reported as fol- 
lows: 

We, the members of the Liberty Associational W. M. U. wish to 
extend our hearty appreciation to everyone connected with the Mills 
Home, whose efforts helped to make our visit there so delightful. The 
dinner so daintly prepared and served was enjoyed by all, and we in 
years to come will remember the kind hospitality so generously ex- 
tended to us. The flowers in our W. M. U. colors made the auditorium 
a place of beauty. We also wish to thank Mrs. Edna R. Harris and 
Mrs. George W. Green for so worthily filling their places on the pro- 
gram. We also wish to thank the children who so delightfully enter- 
tained us with song and playlets. We greatly appreciate the timely 
closing message from Dr. A. B. Conrad on "The Signs of the Times." 
Finally, we wish to express to our Superintendent and all the officers, 
who have worked with her, our sincerest appreciation for the service 
given during the past year. 

The obituary committee reported as follows : 
With humble submission, we bow to the will of God in the going 
home of the following members of our W. M. U. of the Liberty Asso- 
ciation: 

Mrs. E. L. Hepler and Mrs. Mary Kearns, of Thomasville; Mrs. 
Jim Daniels, of Lexington; Mrs. Ruth C. Young, of Smith Grove; Miss 
Alice Rudd, of Mills Home; and Mrs. Celia Ann Prim, of Holloways, 
who only lacked a few months of reaching the century mark. We 
sorrow that we are separated for a time, but we rejoice in the life 
that is promised to his followers, who live and die trusting in the 
Lord. May the tasks that they began on earth be finished in heaven, 
and as we journey from day to day, may we be more loyal to the 
cause the loved, more kind to those about us, more Christlike in our 
living, and thus emulate the example of these, who have lived, loved, 
and labored with us for a little while. May we ever cherish the mem- 
ory of our departed. 

MRS. C. M. HOWELL, 

MRS. R. L. PALMER, 

MRS. CONRAD MOTSINGER, 

The closing devotional was conducted by Dr. A. B. Con- 
rad, who used as his subject, "The Signs of the Times." 
He said in closing that we must follow Christ's great 
words, "Come and Go." 

Rev. Walter Warfford, of Lexington, led the closing 
prayer. 



58 



MINUTES OF THE 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 

Pastors of the Association 



Name Address Church Member of 

Alexander, M. O., Thomasville, N. C Thomasville 

Bradley, Earl L., Spencer, N. C • • Smith Grove 

Dix, O. P., High Point, N. C Gravel Hill 

Ferguson, Ira D., Mt. Airy, N. C Wallburg 

Hanes, J. H., Belews Creek, N. C Westfield 

Hayes, J. M., Lexington, N. C Lexington 

Honeycutt, R. N., Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 7 Jersey 

Johnson, C. R. Erlanger, N. C, Box 183 Tabernacle 

Mason, B. K., Winston -Salem, N. C, Box 2030 New Friendship 

Martin, G. A., Denton, N. C •• Denton 

McMillan, John Arch, Thomasville, N. C Mills Home 

Mumford, E. F. Wallburg, N. C Abbotts Creek 

Penry, H. T., Southmont, N. C • • Stoners Grove 

Pickler, J. M., Albemarle, N. C Taylors Grove 

Roach, E. C, Lexington, N. C, Rt. No. 3 Reeds 

Wafford, Walter L., Lexington, N. C, Box 122. ..... . .Sheets Memorial 

West, Richard L., Welcome, N. C, Rt. No. 1 Rich Fork 

Wilson, S. B., High Point, N. C. • • Lick Creek 

Ordained ministers holding membership in the Association, who 

are not pastors. 

Name Church Member of Address . 

Bishop, S., (Retired) Tabernacle. Lexington, N. C, Rt. 4 

Caldwell, M. R. N., (Inactive) — Taylor Grove, New London, N. C, Rt. 2 

Gallimore, A. R., (Miss, to China) Lexington Lexington, N. C. 

King, J. M. (Student) New Friendship Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

Newton, J. D. (Retired) Thomasville Thomasville, N. C. 



ASSISTANT PASTORS AND EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 
Rev. Wafford, Walter L., Asst. Pastor, Lexington Church, Lexington, 
N. C. 

No church in the Association has an Educational Director 

B. Y. P. U. ASSOCIATIONS OFFICERS 
President, Walter L. Wafford ...Lexington, N. C. 

Secretary & Treas., Miss Sarah Ann Martin Denton, N. C. 

Vice-President, (Lexington Group) Miss Esther Hutchins — 

Lexington, N. C. 

Vice-President, (Denton Group) R. O. Hedrick Denton, N. C. 

Vice-President (Thomasville Group) Mrs. C. H. Howell— 

Thomasville, N. C. 

Junior Intermediate Leader, Miss Annie Johnson Erlanger, N. C. 

Chorister, Eddie Wiggs Erlanger, N. C. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



59 



B. Y. P. U. PRESIDENTS, LEADERS AND DIRECTORS 

CAROLINA AVENUE— 

W. H. Beusse, Thomasville, N. C, Director. 

Miss Gertrude Ingram, Thomasville, N. C, Prest. Senior Union. 

Miss Sadie Hoyle, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2, Leader Jr. Union. 
CENTER HILL: 

Holt Brown, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5, Pres. Sr. Union. 
CHURCHLAND: 

Gilmer Beck, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5, Pres. Sr. Union. 

Miss Freda Barnes, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1, Leader Jr. Union. 
DENTON: 

A. L. Snider, Denton, N. C, Director. 

Miss Vada Garner, Denton, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union. 

R. O. Hedrick, Denton, N. C, Leader Inter. Union. 

Miss Beatrice Cashatt, Denton, N. C, Leader Jr. Union. 
JERSEY: 

Claude Smith, Linwood, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union. 

Mrs. Nannie Smith, Linwood, N. C, Leader Inter. Union. 
LEXINGTON: 

Miss Esther Hutchins, Lexington, N. C, Director. 

John A. Sink, Lexington, N. O, Pres. Adult Union. 

Miss Vivian Sowers, Lexington, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union, No. 1. 

A. J. Newton, Lexington, N. C, Pres. Sr., Union No. 2. 

Mrs. Guy Thomas, Lexington, N. C, Leader Inter. Union. 

Miss Violet Cross, Lexington, N. C, Leader, Jr. Union No. 1. 

Miss Adelaide Craver, Lexington, N. C, Leader Jr. Union No. 2. 
MILLS HOME: 

Mrs. J. A. McMillan, Thomasville, Director. 

Miss Grace Bennett, Thomasville, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union No. 1. 

Miss Mable Hunsucker, Thomasville, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union No. 2. 

J. C. Hawkins, Thomasville, N. C., Pres. Sr. Union No. 3. 

Arbutus McManus, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Inter. Union No. 1. 

Miss Bertha Piland, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Inter. Union No. 2. 

Miss Rebecca Allen, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Jr. Union No. 1. 

Miss Louise Petty, Thomasville, N. C, Leader, Jr. Union No. 2. 

Miss Ethel Johnson, Thomasville, N. C, Leader, Jr. Union No. 3. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP: 

Elmer L. Snyder, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5, Director. 

Mrs. George Nading, Winston-Salem, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union. 

Miss Ola Crowder, Winston-Salem, N. C, No. 5, Leader Int. Union. 

Mrs. Allen Jones, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5, Leader Jr. Union. 
REEDS: 

Miss Annie Lee I^eonard, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3, Pres. Sr. Union. 
Miss Arlene Leonard, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3, Leader Int. Union. 
Miss Elizabeth Patton, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3, Leader Jr. Union. 



60 



MINUTES OF THE 



RICH FORK: 

Wilford Eddinger, Thomas ville, N. C, Rt. 1, Director. 

Wilford Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1, Pres. Sr. Union. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL: 

Tolbert Stroud, Lexington, N. C, Director. 

Earnest Miller, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6, Pres. Sr. Union. 

Miss Mattie Bean, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6, Leader Jr. Union. 

Mrs. Tolbert Stroud, Lexington, N. C, Leader Int. Union. 
SMITH GROVE: 

C. L. Broadway, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1, Director. 

Miss Elizabeth Beck, Spencer, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union. 

Miss Ruth Snyder, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1, Leader Int. Union. 

Miss Irene Beck, Spencer, N. C, Leader Jr. Union. 
SOUTHSIDE: 

Mr. Loyd Black, Thomasville, N. C, Pres. Adult Union. 

Mrs. N. G. Goodin, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 3, Leader Jr. Union. 
TABERNACLE: 

James E. Pruitt, Erlanger, N. C, Director. 

Fred Brooks, Erlanger, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union. 

Miss Annie Johnson, Box 183, Erlanger, N. C, Leader Int. Union. 

Mrs. H. W. Walker, Erlanger, N. C, Leader Jr. Union. 
THOMASVILLE: 

Miss Ellen Mae Pegg, Thomasville, N. C, Director. 

Roy Bray, Thomasville, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union. 

L. E. Teague, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Int. Union. 

Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Jr. Union. 
WALLBURG: 

Evangeline Pardue, Wallburg, N. C, Director. 

Mrs. Santhard, Wallburg, N. C, Pres. Adult Union. 

Miss Lula Mae Motsinger, Wallburg, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union. 

Miss Lena Tuttle, Wallburg, N. C, Leader Jr. Union. 



Supt., Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Supt., Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 

Sec'y. & Treas., Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, Winston-Salem, N. C, 

R. F. D. No. 4. 
Junior Supt., Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Lexington, N. C. 
Personal Service Chairman, Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Thomasville, N. C. 
Mission Study Chairman, Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C, 



W. M. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 



Rt. 4. 



Church 
Abbotts Creek 
Center Hill. . . 



President and Addresses 
Mrs. N. R. Teague, High Point, N. C, Rt. 4 
Mrs. G. A. Martin, Denton, N. C. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



61 



Churchland Mrs. Odell Walser, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Denton Mrs. C. E. Clyatt, Denton, N. C. 

Holloways Mrs. W. H. Johnson, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Jersey •• Mrs. C. A. Smith, Linwood, N. C. 

Lexington Mrs. G. S. Hartzog, Lexington, N. C. 

Mills Home Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Thomasville, N. C. 

New Friendship Mrs. Wm. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 

Reeds Mrs. Alda Craver, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 

Rich Fork - Mrs. Minnie Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. No. 1 

Sheets Memorial Miss Mattie Bean, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Smith Grove Mrs. E. R. Lanning, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Stoners Grove • • Mrs. L. E. Lookabill, Southmont, N. C. 

Southside Mrs. N. G. Goodin, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 3 

Tabernacle Mrs. R. K. Smith, Erlanger, N. C. 

Thomasville Mrs. M. O. Alexander, Thomasville, N. C. 

Wallburg Miss Etta Teague, Wallburg, N. C. 

Y. W. A. COUNSELLORS 

Holloways Miss Tela Beanblossom, High Rock, N. C, Rt. 1 

Lexington • • Mrs. J. M. Hayes, Lexington, N. C. 

New Friendship — Mrs. Farris Swaim, Winston-Salem, N. C, 1904 
Waughtown St. 

Sheets Memorial ■ • . . . .Mrs. Tolbert Stroud, Lexington, N. C. 

Smith Grove Elvira Cornatzer, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Stoners Grove Mrs. A. F. Wafford, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 2 

Tabernacle. • Miss Virginia Johnson, Erlanger, N. C. 

Thomasville Miss Lios Johnson, Thomasville, N. C. 

Wallburg Miss Clara Wall, Wallburg, N. C. 

G. A. LEADERS 

Holloways Miss Elva Crook, High Rock, N. C. 

Lexington Miss Agnes Carrick, Lexington, N. C. 

Mills Home Miss Mary Susan Brock and Mrs. R. D. Covington, 

Thomasville, N. C. 

New Friendship Mrs. Wm. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 

Rich Fork Miss Merriedth Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1 

Smith Grove Mrs. A. H. Lassiter, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Stoners Grove Miss Alma McElhaney, Southmont, N. C. 

Southside. . . • • Miss Lissie Byerly, Thomasville, N. C. 

Tabernacle Miss Virginia Johnson, Erlanger, N. C. 

Thomasville — P. W. Westmoreland and Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomas- 
ville, N. C. 

Wallburg Miss Euva Clinard, Wallburg, N. C. 



62 



MINUTES OF THE 



R. A. LEADERS 

Lexington ....Mrs. Chas. Redwine, Lexington, N. C. 

Mills Home — Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Mrs. R. D. Covington and Mrs. B. P. 
Crutchfield,' Thomasville, N. C. 

New Friendship Miss Florence Motsinger, W.-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

Smith Grove C. L. Broadway, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1 

Stoners Grove Miss Blanch Wrenn, Southmont, N. C. 

Tabernacle Grady J. Haynes, Erlanger, N. C, Box 114 

Thomasville .Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C. 

Wallburg Mrs. R. C. Fowler, Wallburg, N. C. 

SUNBEAM LEADERS 

Denton Mrs. G. A. Martin, Denton, N. C. 

Lexington Mrs. Emery Lanning, Lexington, N. C. 

Mills Home • • Mrs. Mary Cooke, Thomasville, N. C. 

New Friendship Mrs. Oliver F. Doty, W.-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 

Rich Fork Miss Zelma Clinard, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 2 

Sheets Memorial • ■ Mrs. Tom Cooper, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Smith Grove Mrs. Irene Beck, Spencer, N. C. 

Stoners Grove • • Miss Ruth Wrenn, Southmont, N. C. 

Southside Mrs. Maggie Parker, Thomasville, N. C. 

Tabernacle • • . . .Mrs. L. A. Carswell, Erlanger, N. C. 

Thomasville Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C. 

Wallburg • • Mrs. J. W. King, Wallburg, N. C. 



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- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 



One Hundredth and First 
Annual Session 



LICK CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

High Rock, North Carolina 

September 5,-6, 1933 



The Next Session will be Held Tuesday and Wednesday 
After the First Sunday in September, 1934 
with the Jersey Church, 
Linwood, N. C. 



North Carolina 




Held With 



LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 




One Hundredth and First 
Annual Session 

Held With 
LICK CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

High Rock, North Carolina 

September 5,-6, 1933 



The Next Session will be Held Tuesday and Wednesday 
After the First Sunday in September, 1934 
with the Jersey Church, 
Linwood, N. C. 



INDEX 



Page 

Appointment of Committees 11 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors . 42 

Auxiliaries — Associational 1 6 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 6 

Church Clerks 49 

Church Treasurers 51 

Churches and Messengers 7 

Collection Special 31 

Committees: Executive 5 

Finance 11 

On Nominations 11 

Program for 1934 31 

To Report 1934 Chairman 5 

On Digest of Church Letters— 1934 31 

On Time, Place and Preacher 11 

Associational Advisory : 5 

Standing 6 

Constitution and By-Laws 35 

Deceased Members 34 

Directories: Associational 5 

Church 41 

B. Y. P. U 42 

Ordained Ministers 42 

W. M. U 44 

Historical Table 3*5 

Mills Home Sketch 25 

Officers, Associational 5 

Organization 9 

Orphanage Representative 19 

Pastor; of Association 41 

Pastors, New 8 

Proceedings, Associational 9 

Proceedings of W. M. U. Annual Meeting 38 

Reoorts: Biblical Recorder, Religious Literature 12 

B. Y. P. U. 15 

Committee on Nominations j 31 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 30 

Committee on State of Churches 14 

Education 17 

Foreign Missions 23 

Hospitals 27 

Home Missions 22 

Orphanage 19 

Public Morals 28 

State Missions 21 

Sunday Schools 28 

Treasurer 31 

Woman's Work 10 

Executive Committee 13 

Resolution of Thanks 33 

Roll Call of Churches 14 

Statistical Tables 47 

Sermon, Annual 11 

Spring Session 30 

Sunday School Superintendents 48 

W. M. U. Auxiliaries and Officers 42 



DIRECTORIES 

OFFICERS 



G. W. Miller, Moderator 

C. C. Wrenn, Vice Moderator 

Sam J. Smith, Clerk and Treasurer. 



..Lexington, N. C. 
Southmont, N. C. 
...Lexington, N. C. 



ASSOCIATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Rev. Walter L. Warfford, Chairman Lexington, N. C. 

Jesse W. Dickens, Secretary Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6 

D. S. Hayworth, High Point, N. C, Rt. 2; W. H. Lomax, Linwood, 
N. O, Rt. 1; A. L. Snider, Denton, N. C; E. M. Russell, New Hope 
Academy, N. O; J. W. Dickens, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6; R. F. Barnes, 
Lmwood, N. C; C. M. Wall, Lexington, N. C; O. F. Hughes, Thomas- 
ville, N. C, Rt. 3; J. A. Kinney, High Rock, N. C; R. D. Covington, 
Thomasville, N. C; Maskey M. Smith, Winston- Salem, N. C, Rt. G; 
J. F. Foster, Lexington, N. O, Rt. 3; Wilford Eddinger, Thomasville, 
N. C, Rt. 1; W. L. Smith, Lexington, N. O; Miss Ruth Snider, Lin- 
wood, N. O, Rt. 1; Ed Epps, Thomasville, N. O; C. C. Wrenn, South- 
mcnt, N. C; L. C. Carrirk, High Rock, N. O, Rt. 1; E. C. Haynes, 
Erlanger, N. C; L. E. Teague, Thomasville, N. C; Miss Etta Teague, 
Wallburg, N. C; Earlie Klass, Cid, N. C.„ Rt. 1; M. L. Craver, Wel- 
come, N. O; G. W. Summey, Fullers, N. C; All Pastors, the Modera- 
tor and Clerk of the Association are Ex-Officio Members. 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES TO REPORT IN 1934 



Baptist Hospitals I. G. Greer, Thomasville, N. C. 

B. Y. P. U Clyde Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C. 

Christian Education L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N. C. 

Foreign Missions Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 

Home Missions E. F. Mumford, High Point, N. C. Rt. 2 

Ministerial Relief M. O. Alexander, Thomasville, N. C. 

Orphanage Miss Vera Ruth, Thomasville, N. C. 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement.. ..Sam J. Smith, Lexington, N. C. 

Religious Literature J. A. McMillan, Thomasville, N. C. 

State of Churches Walter L. Warfford, Lexington, N. C. 

State Missions Miss Mary Misenheimer, Lexington, N. C. 

Sunday Schools Conrad Motsinger, Winston -Salem, N. C. 

W. M. U Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Thomasville, N. C. 



6 



MINUTES OF THE 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 



b. y. p. u. 



Annual meeting was held with the church at Thomasville, N. C... 
September 1, 1933. 

President — Rev. Walter Warfford, Lexington, N. C. 
Secretary — Miss Eva Jones, Thomasville, N. C. 



Annual Associational Meeting was held with the church at Wall- 
burg, April 20, 1933. 



Personal Service Chairman — Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Thomasville, N. C. 
Mission Study Chrm— Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston- Salem, N. C. R. 4 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 

The Association has no annual Sunday School Convention. 

BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS LOCATED IN THE ASSOCIATION 

The Mills Home— Established 1885 

General Manager — Hon. I. G. Greer Thomasville, N. C. 

Treasurer — R. D. Covington Thomasville, N. C. 

Trustees : 

Chairman— B. W. Spillman Kinston, N. C. 

Secretary— Rev. Thomas Carrick High Point, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY, STANDING COMMITTEES, 
REPRESENTATIVES, AUXILIARY MEETINGS, ETC. 

Associational Missionary or Other Paid Employees — None. 

Standing Committees — None. 

Representative of Laymen's Movement — None. 

Auxiliary Meetings — The Association has no W. M. U. Auxiliary, 
Sunday School Convention, B. Y. P. U. Convention which meet at 
the same time or during the Association. 

Laymen's Movement — None. 



W. M. U. 



Superintendent — Miss Sallie McCracken. 

Associate Supt. — Mrs. R. S. Green 

Sec -Treas.^Mrs. M. M. Smith 

Junior Supt. — Miss Elizabeth Smith 



Thomasville, N. C. 

Thomasville, N. C. 

.Winston- Salem, N. C. Rt. 4 
Linwood, N. C. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



LIST OF MESSENGERS 1933 SESSIONS 

ABBOTTS CREEK— Roy Hayworth, Charlie Spurgeon, Clarence 
Moore, Miss Minnie Hayworth, Charlie Bodenheimer, T. Carrick 
Teague. 

CENTER HILL— Holt Brown, Ulus Hunt, R. B. Sheets, Clifford 
Hunt, Miss Virgie Hunt, Mrs. Holt Brown. 

CHURCHLAND— E. L. Rickard, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Lomax, 
Mrs. J. C. Sowers, Elizabeth Barnes, Treva Barnes, D. R. Kesler, W. 
H. Beck, L. O. Barnes, J. L. McBride. 

DENTON— Mrs. R. A. Allen, J. J. Snider, A. L. Snider, J. L. Sni- 
der, C. E. Clyatt, Mrs. Chas. Lambeth, Mrs. J. W. Davis, J. E. Rus- 
sell, W. R. Snider, J. R. Highsmith, Miss Lantie Daniel. 

GRAVEL HILL— Sam Scarlett, Arthur Loflin, E. M. Russell. 

HOLLOWAYS— Jones Hunt, Albert Warfford, George Workman, 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Palmer, Marvin Hedrick. 

JERSEY— W. K. Trexler, S. A. Sharpe, W. L. Smith, Mrs. Reid 
Smith, Miss Sadie Sharp, Miss Elizabeth Smith. 

LEXINGTON— Mrs. G. D. Crutchfield, Mrs. D. S. Bennett, Mrs. 
T. S. Cross, A. J. Newton, Miss Mary Misenheimer, Helen Smith, 
David Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Sam J. Smith, E. L .Morgan, G. W. Mil- 
ler, Gilmer Cross, P. Lee Smith, Mrs. F. Lee Smith, Miss Gertrude 
Martindale, Mrs. C. R. Sharpe, Miss Alma Owen, S. L. Owen, Mrs. 
E. L. Morgan. 

LIBERTY— B. J. May, L. V. Miller, Mrs. L. E. Hepler, Mrs. H. 
P. May, Miss Bessie Clodfelter, Mrs. B. J. May, Mrs. L. V. Miller, J. 
A. Hepler, H. P. May, I. Z. Clodfelter. 

LICK CREEK— W. R. Cross, W. L. D. Surratt, H. C. Keever, 
Mrs. P. M. Snider, Mrs. W. S. Carrick, Mrs. M. W. Davis. 

MILLS HOME— C. C. McKoin, A. C. Lovelace, Mrs. I. P. Frazier, 
Miss Myra Olive, Miss Jennie Ballard. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Robert Hartman, C. F. Motsinger, M. M. 
Smith, Miss Lois Nifong, Erastus Swaim, Thomas Lambeth. 

REEDS — I. A. Myers, W. L. Craver, James C. Leonard, Neal C. 
Carter, R. W. Hege, Mrs. James C. Leonard, Mrs. N. C. Carter, Mrs. 
G. F. Koonts, Mrs. Walter Craver. 



8 



MINUTES OP THE 



RICH FORK— Miss Mozelle Clinard, E. K. Myers, Wilford Ed- 
dinger. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Spurgeon Ayers, Clarence Cooper, Mrs" 
R. O. Bowers, Mrs. J. J. Carrick, Miss Kate Williams, Mattie Bean, 
Mrs. J. H. Guffy, Miss Mary Swing, B. T. Privett, W. L. Smith. 

SMITH GROVE— Rev. D. Banger, H. R. Lanning, Mrs. E. R. 
Lanning, J. B. Brewer, Miss Ruth Snider. 

SOUTHSIDE— Mrs. M. G. Goodin. 

STONERS GROVE— Mrs. J. C. Thompson, Hugh Warfford, O. 
L. Stoner, Mrs. J. E. Lookabill, Mrs. C. R. Monsees, Joe Long. 

SUMMERVILLE— M. L. Bean, Sam Buie, Earlie Gallimore, Mrs. 
Essie Davis, Carlie Carrick, Creola Carrick. 

TABERNACLE — Rev. C. R. Johnson and Wife, R. S. Hames, 
Miss Lutella Hames, Rev. Grady J. Haynes and Wife, Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred Brooks. 

TAYLORS GROVE— Jerry Caldwell, Mrs. Flatie Russell, Mrs. J. 
M. Coggins, John Epps, Mrs. Lacy Michael, Mrs. Shellie Taylor. 

THOMASVILLE — L. E. Teague, M. O. Alexander, Miss Myrtle 
Chislom, L. W. Hansell. 

WALLBURG— G. W. Wall, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Motsinger, Miss 
Lu!a Motsinger, C. R. Dodson, W. R. Green, C. C. Smith, Marlow 
Tuttle, H. F. Pardue. 

WELCOME— Mrs. E. C. Roach, W .S. Disher, J. F. Crotts, Mrs. 
W. W. Brinkley, Mrs. W. S. Disher, Miss Edna Zimmerman, M. L. 
Craver. 

WALTERS GROVE— Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Gallimore, Mrs. John 
Pierce, Mrs. Fletch Loflin, Miss Arvis Gallimore, Miss Virgie Galli- 
more. 

WESTFIELD— G. W. Summey, A. B. Skeen. 

NEW PASTORS RECEIVED INTO THE ASSOCIATION 
Rev. Louis S. Gaines, Pastor First Church, Lexington, N. C. 

Rev. C. D. Barringer, Salisbury, N. C. Rt. 2, Pastor of Smith 
Grove Church. 



PROCEEDINGS 

of the 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 

of the 

LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Held With the 
LICK CREEK CHURCH 

High Rock, N. C. 
R. F. D. No. 1 



FIRST DAY 
Tuesday, September 5, 1933 

1. The One Hlmdred and First annual session of 
the Liberty Baptist Association convened with the Lick 
Creek Church, High Rock, N. C, R. F. D. No. 1, Tues- 
day, September 5, 1933, at 9:45 A. M. 

2. The devotional service was led by R. D. Coving- 
ton, Treasurer of the Mills Home. 

3. The Association Was called to order by the Mod- 
erator for the transaction of business. 

4. Gr. W. Miller, of Lexington, and R. D. Covington, 
of Thomasville, were placed in nomination for Mod- 
erator. A vote of the body resulted in the election of 
G. W. Miller as Moderator by a vote of 96 to 60. Sam 
J. Smith, of Lexington, was elected Clerk and Treas- 
urer for his 10th consecutive term. C. C. Wrenn, of 
Southmont, was named as Vice Moderator. 

5. Rev. S. B. Wilson, Pastor of the Lick Creek 
church, extended a hearty welcome to the messengers 
and all present. A response was given by Sam J. 
Smith, of Lexington, N. C. 

6. Miss Sallie McCracken, of the Mills Home, reads 
the Report on W. M. U., which was adopted without 
discussion. 



10 



MINUTES OP THE 



REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

The Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Association held 
its annual meeting with the Wallburg church in April, with a good 
attendance. It was a pleasure to have our missionaries, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. R. Gallimore, with us and to have them take prominent 
parts on the program. All the officers were reelected with the ex- 
ception of Mrs. C. R. Redwine, who presented her resignation; Miss 
Elizabeth Smith was chosen to succeed her as young people's leader. 

Our watchword for the year is "Launch out into the deep and 
let down your nets." Many splendid programs have been built 
around this theme during the year and we feel that there has been 
a deepening of the spiritual life in many of our churches' because of 
the messages that hae been delivered on this subject. 

At our State annual meeting in March it was decided that the 
1933 June Heck Memorial offering be designated as follows: $500.00 
to Dr. George Green for surgical instruments for his work in Ogbo- 
moso, Africa; $300.00 to Dr. John Lake for his leper work in China; 
$2 ; 000.00 to the Calder Willingham school in Japan and the remain- 
der to be used in building a home for single missionary women in 
Wuchow, China. This money was raised and appropriated as 
planned. There is one regret, however, connected with it and that 
is that the money did not reach reach the school in Japan before 
th death of Mr. C. K. Dozier, who, with Mrs. Dozier, had given to 
this work his best years of sacrificial and efficient service. The 
Liberty W. M. U. was glad to have a share in this Heck Memorial 
offering which through the years has meant so much to many of 
our mission fields. 

We raised in our association last year $5,525.00, going a little 
over our quota. This year we are asked to make a ten per cent in- 
crease. The offerings so far do not indicate that we will reach this 
goal, certainly not unless the reports for the next two quarters show 
a large increase. 

We regret that North Carolina did not see her way clear to go 
into the Hundred Thousand Club plan which is for each individual 
to pay one dollar a month above the pledge to be applied on the 
debts. But this fact should not bar any one who can do so from 
joining the club which seems to be the only solution for paying off 
our debts. We are glad to report some members among our societies 
and trust we may have many more. 

The W. M. U. is stressing Royal Ambassador work this year, this 
being their 25th anniversary. Mrs. Gallimore made a special appeal 
to the pastors and men of the association in behalf of the work for 
the boys. It is hoped that some splendid young men may be found 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



11 



for leaders of these groups as they respond more readily to the 
leadership of men. 

In closing this report I wish to pass on a message that our State 
President has sent out to the societies: "There can be no question 
that at this time we need to present a united front againt the effort 
to repeal the 18th Amendment. The Woman's Missionary Union 
stands with all its strength for the forces of righteousness against 
the forces of evil." 

sallie l. Mccracken. 

7. Hugh Lattimore, representing the Relief and 
Annuity Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 
made a very interesting speech in the behalf of aid for 
retired ministers. 

8. Several visitors were recognized at this time, 
among whom were Rev. John A. Summey, w'ho served 
many churches in the Association 30 and 40 years ago, 
and C. C. Smith, Moderator of the Piedmont Associa- 
tion. Members of other denominations were asked to 
stand by the Moderator, who gave them a most hearty 
welcome. 

9. Rev. Louis S. Gaines was recognized as the new 
Postor of the First Church, Lexington, and Rev. D. C. 
Barringer as the recently called Pastor at Smith Grove. 

10. The Moderator at this time makes the follow- 
ing Committee Appointments : 

ON FINANCE: C. C. Wrenn, A. L. Snider, G. W. Wall. 

ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER: G. C. Palmer, John A. 
Kinney, L. E. Teague. 

ON NOMINATIONS: M. O. Alexander, Miss Mary Misenheimer, 
Sam J. Smith. 

ON OBITUARIES: E. C. Roach, E. L. Bradley, Sam Sharpe. 

ANNUAL SERMON 

11. Rev. E. F. Mumford, pastor of the Abbotts 
Creek church, preaches the Annual Sermon. His sub- 
ject was Missions. The sermon was ably delivered 
and well received by a large and attentive audience. 

12. The body adjourns at 12:30 P. M. to reconvene 
at 2:00 P. M. 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

13. After songs by E. C. and Mark Lovelace, Miss 
Myrtle Chislom and the children of Rev. and Mrs. R. 
N. Honeycutt, the devotional was conducted by Rev. 
Grady Haynes, of Erlanger, N. C. His subject was, 
The New Day Challenge to the Baptist Denomination. 

14. Rev. B. E. Morris, pastor of First Baptist 
church, Statesville, N. C, delivers an address present- 
ing to the Association some facts concerning the South- 
ern Baptist Theological Seminary at Louisville, Ky. 

15. Rev. B. K. Mason reads the Report on Religious 
Literature. After motion to adopt the report is dis- 
cussed by Rev. Mason and is adopted. 

REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION SESSION 1933 

"At each Annual Session of the Liberty Association, we re- 
ligiously read and adopt a report on the Biblical Recorder, praising 
it as a paper and pledging to it our fealty and support. Yet, mighty, 
mighty few of us take it, read it, or aid it in any whatever. 

What I suspect the paper needs in order to run is cash rather 
than bouquets, subscribers rather than sweet platitudes, and genuine 
support from pulpit and pew rather than spreading upon the min- 
utes of our Association a lot of meaningless words and, phrases tell- 
ing our people what a great denominational paper we have, and we 
might add, read perhaps as little as we read the Bible. 

We have been going through a serious depression. Our denomi- 
national papers have fared hard. I suspect as I look through a re- 
cent issue of the Recorder that if it were not for Lydia E. Pinkham's 
Vegetable Compound, Grove's Tasteless Chill Tonic, and Calotabs 
that the Recorder would be compelled to suspend publication. It is 
a shame that the Organ of our Baptist State Convention must live 
on advertising that decent dailies and secular publications spurn. 

Our people have been hard hit by the depression, too. But most 
of us Baptists waste far more in a year and spend far more on non- 
essentials than the cost of a year's subscription to the Biblical Re- 
corder. 

We can say once more that the Recorder is a worthy paper; that 
Mr. Parmer is carrying on in a great way in the place once graced by 
J. W. Bailey, Hight C. Moore and Livingston Johnson; that one 
must have the Recorder to be a well informed Baptist. Let us add 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



that as pastors and laymen, we will prove this year that we mean it 
or let us quit adopting reports that praise a paper we do nothing to 
help support." 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. K. MASON. 

16. C. C. Wrenn reads the Report of The Executive 
Committee. 

Rev. G. A. Martin, pastor of the Denton church, 
reads the Report on State of the Churches. The reports 
are discussed by Rev. Martin and are adopted. 

REPORT ON EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Your Committee makes the following report: 

Upon application from Sheets Memorial Church for aid on pas- 
tor's salary, recommendation was made to the General Board that 
such aid be granted to the amount of $500.00. $400.00 of this amount 
was granted by the Board. We are glad to report that the work of 
this new church, under the leadership of its faithful and efficient 
pastor, Brother Walter Warfford, has made such fine progress. This 
church has been organized but three years and has grown in mem- 
bership from around thirty to 199, and now has an attendance in 
Sunday School of around three hundred. We feel that the oppor- 
tunity at this point is very great and we ask that the Association do 
all that is possible to assist this church in the great work of carry- 
ing forward the kingdom in the community. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

I. We recommend that this Executive Committee be abolished. 

II. That a board, to be known as the Advisory Board, be ap- 
pointed by the Association. 

1. That this board be composed of one member from each 
church in the Association, with the Moderator, Clerk and all pastors 
ex officio members. 

2. That there shall be a chairman of the board appointed from 
the membership thereof by the Association. 

3. That there shall be a Secretary to the board appointed from 
the membership thereof by the Association. 

4. That the chairman and secretary be elected from the board 
and by the board after this year. 

5. That this board shall have the right and power to fill by ap- 



14 



MINUTES OP THE 



pointment any vacancy or vacancies which may occur upon the rec- 
ommendation from the church from which such vacancy or vacan- 
cies may occur. 

6. That this board shall be at all times subject to the Acts of 
the Association. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. C| WRENN, 
For the Committee 

THE STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

Churches, like people, are different. All seven reported on by 
the Holy Ghost in Revelation were alike in status but different in 
state. The churches at Rome, Philippi and Ephesus and Colossians 
are very different from Corinth, Athens and Thyariria. 

The status of each and every one of these are exactly the same 
and we need to make a distinction between status and state. Status 
is our standing in heaven. Redeemed, bloodwashed, newborn, from 
above, of God; the sheep of his pasture, the children of God, and 
joint heirs with Jesus Christ to all the honors, privileges and bene- 
fits of his abundant mercies. However humble, weak, trifling and 
no account one of these little ones may seem, the great 
white Christ interceeds with the Father, interposing five bleeding 
wounds as his surety. Of this relation no committee may presume 
to report. It is private, personal and individual. Whatever the 
state may seem to be the status remains the same, unchanged and 
unchangeable. The least Christian is most important to Christ. Its 
emotions, reverent awe, aspirations and exultations and raptures re- 
fuses to be measured by human expedients. Even in those organi- 
zations that seem moribund there remains a divine spark that will 
leap to flame at His call. 

I know that in all this there ia not one tangible thing that you 
can tabulate in totals. I know also that all the others that will give 
flattering totals are as chaff as compared to these spiritual intangi- 
bles. The finest things that the Christ saw in the seven he saw in 
the one that would have made the poorest show at the association. 

G. A. MARTIN. 

17. Rev. Walter L. Warfford makes motion; That 
hereafter one member of the Committee on Digest of 
Church Letters write the Report on State of the 
Churches. The motion was adopted. 

18. Roll Call of the Churches was made at this time; 
the following persons spoke of the greatest accom- 
plishments of their churches during the last year: 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



Carrick Teague Abbotts Creek 

R. K. Williams Churchland 

A. L. Snider Denton 

E. M. Russell Gravel Hill 

G C. Palmer Holloways 

Mrs. Reid Smith Jersey 

Sam J. Smith Lexington 

L. V. Miller Liberty 

S. B. Wilson Lick Creek 

J. A. McMillan Mills Home 

M. M. Smith New Friendship 

J. P. Foster Reeds 

Wilford Eddinger Rich Fork 

Rev. W. L. Warfford Sheets Memorial 

Miss Ruth Snider Smith Grove 

Mrs. N. G. Goodin Southside 

C. C. Wrenn Southmont 

Rev. S. B. Wilson Summer ville 

Grady Haynes Tabernacle 

Rev. M. O. Alexander Thomas ville 

C. R. Dodson Wallburg 

M. L. Craver Welcome 

G. W. Summey Westfield 

Miss Virgie Gallimore Walters Grove 

19. Mr. Clarence C. Smith, Moderator of the Pied- 
mont Association addresses the Association in praise 
of the Board and Chart prepared by the Committee on 
Digest of Church Letters. 

Adjournment at 4:10 P. M. 



TUESDAY EVENING SESSION 

20. The Devotional is conducted by Rev. B. K. Ma- 
son, pastor of the New Friendship church. 

21. The Report on B. Y. P. U. Work is read by Rev. 
Gilmer Cross, of Lexington. After being discussed by 
Mr. Cross the report is adopted. 

REPORT ON B. Y. P. U. 

The eighth annual session of the Liberty Baptist Associational 
B. Y. P. U. convention convened with the First Baptist Church. 
Thomasville, N. C, September 1, 1933. Miss Winnie Rickett, Secre- 
tary of the State B. Y. P. U., and Mr. Bryan Hurd, President of the 



16 



MINUTES OP THE 



Regional B. Y. P. U. were the guest speakers at both sessions of the 
association. Each of the guest speakers brought a very helpful and 
inspirational talk to the young people of J;he Liberty Association. 

New officers were elected for the year with Rev. W. L. Warfford, 
President; Mr. Clyde Edinger, Vice-President; Miss Eva Jones, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer; Mr. Jack Freeman, Chorister; Miss Virginia 
Fritts, Pianist; and Miss Vera Ruth, Junior-Intermediate leader. 
The new district leaders were also elected with Mrs. Cy Howl!, 
Thomasville District Leader; Miss Esther Hutchins, Lexington Dis- 
trict Leader; and Mr. R. O Hedrick, Denton District Leader. In this 
group of new officers and district leaders, we believe that we have 
the most competent persons that could have been chosen from the 
Liberty Association. We earnestly believe that each of these new 
officers and district leaders will give of their very best to this par- 
ticular division of the Master's work. We also believe they will 
command the whole-hearted support of every B. Y. P. U. member 
of the Liberty Association. Under the regime of these new officers 
and leaders, we are hoping and trusting our B. Y. P. U.s shall be 
enlarged and the extension work be spread throughout the entire 
Liberty Association. 

During the past year the work has made no gain in the organ- 
ization of new unions and the enlistment of new members. Instead 
of making a gain this work has lost two Senior unions and 68 mem- 
bers of the total enrollment. At the present we have three Adult 
Unions in the Association with 25 members; 16 Senior Unions with 
310 members; 12 Intermediate Unions with 257 members; 17 Junior 
Unions with 331 members making a total of 43 Unions in the Asso- 
ciation and a total enrollment of 923 which shows a loss of 68 mem- 
bers during the year. 

In spite of this decrease in the work for the year, we must take 
new courage because the harvest fields are ripe. We have enrolled 
in the Junior department of our Sunday Schools 1,115 pupils, more 
than we have enrolled in all our B. Y. P. U. work combined. We 
have enrolled in the Intermediate department of our Sunday Schools 
928 pupils, which number is almost equal to the total enrollment of 
all our B. Y. P. U. work combined. We have enrolled in the Young 
People's department of our Sunday Schools 1,244 pupils, more than 
in all our B. Y. P. U. work combined. We have enrolled in the Adult 
department of our Sunday Schools 1,550 pupils. At least one fourth 
of these are definite prospects for the B. A. U. Counting only one 
fourth of the Adults enrolled in our Sunday Schools as definite 
prospects for the B. A. U., we have a total of 387 B. A. U. prospects 
while only 25 are enlisted in the work. We have 3,287 prospects for 
the B. Y. P. U.s while only 898 are enlisted in the work. Counting 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



the prospects for the B. A. U. and the prospects for the B. Y. P. U. 
together we have a total of 3,674 prospects while only 923 are en- 
listed in the work. 

Oh, what a challenge this field offers for organization and en- 
listment. "Then saith he unto his disciples, The harvest truly is 
plenteous, but the labourers are few;" (Matt. 9:37) "Say not ye, 
There are yet four months, and then cometh harvest? behold, I say 
unto you, Lift up your eyes, and look on the fields; for they are 
white already to harvest." (John 4:35) Now, may we all obey the 
words of our Lord and may we all work and pray that the time may 
soon come when every church in the Liberty Association shall sup- 
port and enjoy the blessing^ received from the B. Y. P. U. and may 
the majority of our Young People be enlisted in this great work for 
the Master. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GILMER H. CROSS. 

22. The Report on Christian Education, prepared by 
Rev. E. L. Bradley, pastor of the Churchland church, 
in his absence was adopted without reading or dis- 
cussion. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Since the state cannot attempt to teach religion in her schools, 
what shall be our attitude toward state education? When our Bap- 
tist fathers began their educational program they did not oppose a 
state school system. There was no state system to oppose. "Chris- 
tianity has ever been the nursing mother of education. The state 
entered the field of education under the tutulage of the church. The 
teachers in the state schools were Christian men, in many cases 
Christian ministers. There has never been any antipathy and is 
not now. The state schools have been supported by our Baptist peo- 
ple But we insist that education must not be completely seculari- 
zed. If the church vacates the field of education and leaves it al- 
together to the State, we shall see the story of education during the 
nineteenth century in Germany repeated. The Christian content in 
education must be upheld and only the presence of the Christian 
school can do it. 

"The supremely essential element cf human life is spiritual. All 
of the mechanical knowledge of the Egyptians could not save her 
civilization. All the statesmanship and philosophy and mighty legal 
system of Rome could not save her boasted civilization. Neither 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



will it save ours. Lloyd George says, "Now it is -either Christ or chaos, 
either the Kingdom of God or world revolution." Bernard Shaw 
says: "Why not give Christianity a trial? After contemplating the 
world of human nature for nearly 60 years, I see no other way out 
of the world's misery but the way of doing Christ's will." 

President James of the University of Illinois says: "Education 
without religion is unnatural, dangerous and abnormal. Our people 
ought to take our denominational institutions to heart and support 
them with a generosity never before known." 

Christian Education is necessary if we are going to carry out 
the Great Commission of Christ. The chief work of Gary in India 
was that of Bible translation. Luther Rice gave his strength for the 
establishment of Columbia University for the education of the min- 
istry and the spreading of the gospel. He says, "The great enemy 
of foreign missions and of denominational progress is ignorance ,and 
that a condition of large success is in an educated ministry." Of the 
first 119 colleges built in America, east of the Mississippi River, 104 
were established by different denominations for religious purposes. 
Over the gateway of the world-famed institution, Harvard University, 
may be read these words: "That a learned ministry may not perish 
from the earth." Our own dear Wake Forest was built for the edu- 
cation of the ministry. It has been the Christian schools that have 
given to the country its leaders. Eight of the country's Chief Jus- 
tices were college graduates, while seven came from Christian col- 
leges. Eighteen of our Nation's Presidents have been college grad- 
uates, while sixteen have come from Christian colleges. Two-thirds 
of the names found in "Who's Who" came from Christian colleges. 

We must look today to the trained leaders for leadership. There 
are many important questions confronting us. Who shall decide 
these questions? There is the liquor question, the arch enemy of 
our civiliation, yet the cry on every hand is not for prohibition but 
for repeal. The same people who fought for the separation of the 
church and State will fight to see the separation of the saloon and 
the State. There is the divorce question, corrupt election laws and 
many others. Men trained in the principles of Christ, and Christ 
alone, can answer those questions for the best of the country. 

E. L. BRADLEY. 

23. Dr. A. C. Reid, a native of the Lick Creek com- 
munity and now a member of the Wake Forest Col- 
lege faculty, delivered an address on Christian educa- 
tion. 

24. The Association adjourned at 9:00 P. M. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION 

25. The Devotional, a most impressive and highly 
spiritual one, was brought by Rev. M. O. Alexander, 
pastor of First Church, Thomasville. 

26. The Report on the Mills Home is read by Miss 
Mary Misenheimer. Atfter a few remarks by Miss 
Misenheimer and a motion to adopt the report an able 
address in the interest of the Orphanage was delivered 
by Mr. I. G. Greer, Superintendent of the Mills Home. 
The report was adopted. 

REPORT ON THE MILLS HOME 

Someone has said, 

"The crying task of every human race, 
Is so to plan their children's earthly way, 
That opportunity and work and play 
Are as the air of heaven a commonplace, 
Granted by right of birth, and not by act of grace." 

Surely our child welfare program in North Carolina is the pride 
and joy of every Baptist who knows anything at all about it. We 
have been partially meeting the needs of fatherless children through 
three agencies: first, the Mills Home, second, the Kennedy Home, 
and third, Mother's Aid. What a glorious and decenf privilege it is 
to follow the Master into these paths of real sacrifice and service. 
May we each do our part. The need that has not been met is great 
and appealing in its challenge. 

However, Charity and Children said a few weeks ago that out 
of more than 2374 Baptist Sunday Schools in this state less than 600 
contribute at all regularly. Can't they also be taught that truly as 
the Master hath said, "It is more blessed to give than to receive/' 
and "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these, ye 
have done it unto me." 

Not including Mother's Aid, from Nov. 1885 to July 1933, 3022 
boys and girls have been and are being sheltered, protected, fed and 
educated by the Baptists of North Carolina. At present we are aid- 
ing in their own homes 215 children with 55 mothers. These added 
to the number now present at the Mills Home and the Kennedy Home 
makes a total of 848 children that are in our care. Nevertheless, 
another report states that during the year 1932 we have been able 
to care for 1005 dependent and neglected children. Notice the re- 
trenchment because of lack of funds. 



20 



MINUTES OP THE 



There are several reasons why our own association of churches, 
the Liberty, ought to set the pace for all of the Baptist Sunday 
Schools of N. C. with their efforts and gifts for fatherless and mo- 
therless children. 

1. The Mills Home is the only Baptist center of interest located 
in our association. 

2. During 1932 only Guilford, Forsyth and Durham counties 
could claim larger numbers of Mills Home children than the 29 who 
came from Davidson County. 

The twenty-seven churches of our association from July 1, 1931 
—July 1, 1932 gave $4,844.11; from July 1, 1932— July 1, 1933 they 
gave $3,486.05 or $1,358.06 less than the year before. Allowing $20.25 
per child per month for each of our 29 boys and girls at the Mills 
Home last year in this association we gave less than half enough 
needed for their actual care. From this viewpoint we have no real 
share in caring for our own who were helped by Mother's Aid. 

How could this association really set the pace for the others of 
North Carolina? We could more than accomplish this if one-half 
or even one-third of the adult membership of our Sunday Schools 
were to try to give one dollar per month regularly and the amount 
of one day's income at Thanksgiving. Surely, we can do better this 
year than last if indifferent S. S. superintendents will only arm 
themselves with a little love and enthusiasm We have been too 
prone to shift the burden and the responsibility on others as so 
aptly implied by the oft-heard expression, "The orphanage will be 
taken care of somehow." While interest and enthusiasm wavers and 
wanes the "somehow" must be stretched to make ends meets for tin 
meagerest necessities that children may not be hungry or orphan- 
ages padlocked. As the darkness of depression fades into the light 
of a new deal, may we pray God that the time may come when the 
child welfare forces of the Old North State may so successfully 
combine their energies as to adequately provide for all of its father- 
less. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARY MISENHEIMER. 

27. The Report on State Missions is read by Conrad 
Motsinger. 

The Report on Home Missions is read by Rev. Wal- 
ter Warfford. 

The Report on Foreign Missions prepared by Mrs. 
D. F. Conrad, of Lexington, is read by Rev. Walter 
Warfford. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



The three reports are adopted, after which the As- 
sociation is addressed by Dr. Sam Templeton, pastor 
of Brown Memorial church, Winston-Salem, N. C. His 
subject was "Missions." He stated that when a 
church ceased to be missionary it was beginning to die. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

The fact that about one-half of all church members in North 
Carolina are members of Baptist churches is due in large measure 
to the fact that for one hundred years the Baptist State Convention 
has pursued an aggressive State Mission Program. During all the 
years Baptists have used the agency of State Missions to preach the 
Gcspel to the poor. And in the course of the years this policy has 
produced rich dividends which can be counted, to say nothing of 
those spiritual values which have been created and which it is im- 
possible to measure. The poor do not always remain poor, and last 
yfjar a church in North Carolina which at one time was aided by the 
State Mission Board gave as much to the support of all objects, 
State, South wide, and world wide as was given by twenty-five entire 
associations for the same objects. 

It has ever been the policy of the Board to aid not only strug- 
gling churches but also those churches in strategic centers where the 
local congregation is unable for a time to provide the type of minis- 
terial service which is needed. This policy should be continued. 
However, due to a scarcity of funds during the past year, only about 
one-third as many churches have received aid as was the case three 
or four years ago. 

For many years now State Missions, through the Sunday School 
and B. Y. P. U. Departments, has stimulated the growth of Sunday 
schools and the improvement of the teaching staff. During a recent 
week there were about 5,000 people in eighty-five churches engaged 
in study, the purpose of which was to produce better and greater 
Sunday schools. And when the story of the growth of young peo- 
ple's work shall be written it will read like a romance. 

In recent years the Board, through its Building Evangelist, has 
planned and helped in the erection of scores of church houses in 
about every section of North Carolina, and these will remain visible 
monuments of a wise policy. This work is being discontinued as of 
October 1 of the present year. There appears hardly any need to 
state the reason for its discontinuance. Likewise it has been neces- 
sary to discontinue the work of stimulating cooperative and wise 
leadership among the about a quarter of a million negro Baptists in 
the state. The Board is still helping to provide guidance for the 
Indians who are left among us; and at Oteen the Board has some 



22 



MINUTES OP THE 



little part in providing spiritual comfort and counsel to the sick 
there. 

New times, however, demand new emphasis. The problem of the 
rural church is probably more acute today than it has ever been. 
Here is a vital problem to which we have hardly begun to find a so- 
lution. Keen and interested observers believe that the moral and 
spiritual well being of the people who live in the country is largely 
a problem which is committed, in the very nature of the case, to 
Baptist people. The resources, spiritual and financial, of our Con- 
vention should speedily be devoted to this challenging task and op- 
portunity. The rural areas of North Carolina can become the finest 
place on earth in which young people may grow physically, morally 
and spiritually strong. It is not such an area now. If, however, the 
problem is to be solved at all, trained, consecrated people must be 
secured and funds in great abundance must be provided. 

Let us remember that State Mission Day in our Sunday schools 
and churches is set for the last Sunday* in October. Let us on that 
day make a great freewill offering for State Missions. 

CONRAD F. MOTSINGER. 

HOME MISSION REPORT 

The mission program of Jesus is outlined in the eighth verse of 
the first chapter of Acts. "But ye shall receive power after that the 
Holy Ghost is come upon you: and ye shall be witnesses unto me 
both in Jerusalem, and in Judea, and in Samaria, and unto the ut- 
termost part of the earth." In these, the last words of Jesus, we 
are shown three things: Our equipment — "Power," our task — "Wit- 
ness," both "in" and "unto," and our field, "The earth." 

It is signally significant to note that in the words of our Christ 
in between "Judea' and the "uttermost parts of the earth" lies 
"Samaria." Our Samaria is the peoples, places and spiritual destitu- 
tion within our own borders, and out of reach of the state and local 
forces, yet within the boundry lines where the "uttermost parts of 
the earth" begin. This is our mission field. 

In the South we boast of our Christianity, and glory in the fact 
that we are sometimes called the Bible belt. We are prone to think 
of ourselves as the beloved of God. We have boasted of the fact 
that our people are church going people, but these alarming facts 
challenge our boastings, and should crush into oblivion our thoughts 
of conceit and pride. In this "dear Southland of ours," only 44.3 per 
cent of our population above ten years of age are enrolled as a mem- 
ber of any church. 55.7 per cent of our population above ten years 
of age are not enrolled in any church. 24.5 per cent of our popula- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



23 



tion. however, are negroes, and 13.3 per cent are foreign or children 
of foreign parents. This is our Samaria. 

Specifically, our mission work in the homeland embraces all the 
work fostered by the board among the foreign-speaking people, the 
Negroes, the Indians, the Deaf, and the work in large cities, Cuba 
and Canal Zone. Truly the favor of God has rested upon the labors 
of our faithful missionaries. They report 1,635 baptisms, and 1,033 
other conversions, making a total of 2,668 won to Christ in the last 
year. 

Truly during the past years we have been thinking of our mis- 
sionary work in terms of dollars and cents, bonds and interest, bank- 
ers and debts, until the minds of our people have been turned away 
from the great objective of Missions. We must face the facts, how- 
ever, but we must also remember that in spite of the fact that our 
nome Missionary force has been reduced, that contributions to Home 
Missions have fallen off considerably, yet the Home Mission Board 
is carrying on a vastly important Missionary enterprise. Let us ral- 
ly to the support of its work, as well as all our missionary activities, 
and may our Baptist people not be found lacking in this day when 
for the world it is "Christ or Chaos." 

WALTER L. WARFFORD. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

The gospel makes the greatest progress at times when there is 
the greatest stress and strain. Now one does not have to be pessi- 
mistic to admit that the world at large is passing through a period 
of uncertainty. Yet true followers of Jesus Christ the world over 
have no need to fear; they need only to trust. 

It should hearten us to feel that progress is being made on mis- 
sion fields. Although Satan has done his worst to undo what has 
been done, even his satanic majesty can overstep himself. And he 
has done so. 

In thinking of mission fields we should also think of our own 
land, for after all it is only Christian in name. The churches of our 
homeland need to take account of themselves. It is too often the 
case that worldliness in the churches has destroyed the working of 
the Spirit. Is it possible that the Holy Spirit has been shut out of 
some of our churches? The church of which Appolus was minister 
had not even heard that there was such a thing. (Acts 19:1). 

As we look at the course of Christian history it is sometimes dif- 
ficult to tell just what and where mission fields are. Those of the 
past are now supposedly Christian today, and at the present we can- 
not tell where will be the fields for missionary work tomorrow. We 



24 



MINUTES OP THE 



are today sending missionaries to Jerusalem, and to Rome, and even 
to Europe. And yet we do not forget that they once sent messengers 
of the gospel to us. Russia was once a so-called Christian nation, 
and yet today there has come such a reaction against the corrupt 
practices of the old Greek church that we do not know what to call 
Russia. Communism and atheism and the movement to repudiate 
God have done their best (or worst) to take that land. Certainly 
Russia needs our prayers. 

Africa is still the dark continent and yet some of the first Chris- 
tian churches were established in the northern part of that great 
continent. Reports from our own mission in Nigeria are encourag- 
ing. Even in the midst of financial stress several of our mission- 
aries have, by special means, been able to return to the work. 

South Africa continues to offer its challenge of the gross super- 
stition and corrupt practices of the Catholic church. In those lands, 
civilized enough, the question often arises — why send missionaries 
to the countries of South America? Dr. J. L. Hart, who has been in 
our Association during the year, brought eloquent appeals for the 
need of the gospel in its purity there. 

We, as Southern Baptists, have no work in India. Our Northern 
Baptist brotherhood do. India is still a challenge to our greatest 
faith 

Japan and China remain our main fields for missionary effort. 
Our Japan Mission has never been properly manned and is still in 
great need of men and money for carrying on. Rev. C. K. Dozier, 
one of the most beloved and useful workers in Japan has recently 
fallen on the post of duty there. 

China, with its millions, is still one of the greatest mission 
fields in the world. For the last ten years Satan has made every 
effort possible to stamp out the work of the gospel there. China has 
been the chief target of all the adverse movements from Russia. 
But, now we feel that a reaction is coming. There have been many 
faithful ones there who have kept their faith strong and their wit- 
ness firm, and the light has shined there. While there has been a 
sifting in the ranks we can rejoice that the work there goes on in a 
substantial way. The seed sowing time will bear fruit in a bountiful 
harvest. Each of us can have a part in that great endeavor through 
our prayers and our gifts. Along with several others who have gone 
back are the Gallimores of our own Association. Some of our 
churches were glad to have a little part in "speeding them on their 
way." 

Cur missionary enterprise is ever our greatest concern. If we 
are to maintain our great heritage as Baptists it must be by cur zeal 
for a lost world. The Lord has blessed us in the past, but if we are 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 



to claim that blessing in the future we must not look back, but go 
forward in our winning of the world for Christ. 

MRS. D. F. CONRAD. 

28. The Association adjourned at 12:30 P. M. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

29. The body re-convened at 2:00 P. M. 

30. The Devotional is conducted by Rev. C. R. 
Johnson, pastor of the Tabernacle church at Erlanger. 

31. A brief sketch of the Mills Home, written by the 
Moderator, G. W. Miller, is read and it is voted that it 
along with a cut of the late J. H. Mills, founder of the 
Home be printed in the minutes. 

THE MILLS HOME 

The day the Baptists of North Carolina organized the Conven- 
tion, every form of service in the program of Jesus became a possi- 
ble object of that body. 

Half this period passed before definite social service took on 
organized form. The very interesting fact is, that Baptists were 
leaders especially in providing homes for dependent children. J. H. 
Milk-, one of the outstanding Baptists in 1873, offered the resolution 
in the Grand Lodge of Masons at Oxford, N. C, establishing that 
institution. 

The outstanding expression of social service for this century for 
our people, is the development of the orphanage and work for de- 
pendent children, and J. H. Mills is the towering human figure. 

"Every great institution is but the lengthened shadow of one 
man" is not altogether true in this case. But "Mills was the great 
turbine around which revolved the powers: the giants" of that day. 
When the Baptist State Convention refused to adopt the orphanage 
it was Mills, Taylor, Scarborough, Green, Clement, Hangham, 
Gwaltney, Overby and Forest who organized and chartered the 
North Carolina Orphanage Association and J. H. Mills became the 
manager. 

Thomasville was selected as the site January 12, 1885. "Although 
there was interest aroused, the work was beset with difficulties suffi- 
cient to challenge the heroic souls placed at the front." 

It is significant that this institution was cradled in storm, that 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



27 



the first General Manager was of the rugged type, withal a man of 
rare ability and culture and a tender love for children, especially the 
unfortunate. 

The first meeting was held at Thomasville under the famous 
hickory tree August 5, 1885. The first copy of Charity and Children 
was issued July 14, 1887. If Mr. Mills had done no more than name 
the paper, that alone would have been a great contribution. This 
paper is the right arm of the institution, and one of the most widely 
rend papers in the state, with a circulation of twenty-seven thous- 
and. 

G. W. MILLER. 

32. Rev. J. A. McMillan, pastor at Mills Home reads 
the Report on Hospitals. 

A. J. Newton reads the Report on Sunday Schools. 

Sam J. Smith reads the Report on Public Morals. 

The three reports are adopted, after which the body 
is address by Rev. F. A. Bower, of Albemarle, N. C, in 
the interest of retaining the 18th Amendment. All 
pronounced it as one of the greatest speeches ever 
heard. Rev. C. A. Upchurch, representing the United 
Dry Forces of the State also made a few remarks. 

REPORT ON HOSPITALS 

When Jesus said, "I come that they might have life and have it 
more abundantly " he meant more than physical life but surely he 
also meant physical life. Much of his ministry was that of healing 
the sick. He did not give doles but he gave capacity. Instead of 
giving money to the sick He gave them strength so that they could 
be self supporting. The central idea behind the National Recovery 
Act and other measures recently passed by our Congress is to give 
to every one the privilege of being independent. The dole is not the 
way to assist people: it pauperizes them. 

The Baptist Hospital located at Winston- Salem is the means 
whereby Baptists give capacity to the sick. Hundreds have been 
carried there totally dependent upon others and left altogether in- 
dependent. The Hospital says to the sick, "Silver and gold have I 
none, but such as I have I give." And it gives health and independ- 
ence. 

The only time that Baptists of North Carolina have the oppor- 
tunity to give to this healing agency is on Mother's Day in the 



28 



MINUTES OP THE 



spring. We urge every church and Sunday school plan for the day, 
pray for the hospital and make a great offering. 

J. A. MCMILLAN. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

11 is inttresting to note from the minutes of the Centennial 
Session of the Liberty Association certain information concerning 
our Sunday Schools. A glimpse at this report will serve to show us 
our shortcomings and our accomplishments, from which we may 
profit in the future if we determine to go forward. 

It is observed there were 333 new church members enrolled by 
baptism. Out of this number 278 were members of the Sunday 
School. This fact alone gives unmistakable evidence of the value 
of the Sunday School in the Lord's work. 

The Mills Home Sunday School leads all others in average at- 
tendance. Its total enrollment was 599, and the average attendance 
was 520. The Tabernacle church at Erlanger deserves honorable 
mention, it having an enrollment of 412, with an average attendance 
of 362. 

A fact of much regret is that our association cannot boast of a 
standard Sunday School within her borders. Only six of our Sun- 
day Schools were graded. Not one of them held a Daily Vacation 
Bible School. In making this report, I am without information as 
to our record with reference to number of standard Sunday Schools, 
number of graded schools and number having Daily Vacation Bible 
Schools during the Associational year just closed. We will find in 
Standard Sunday Schools in almost every instance a people glorify- 
ing the name of the Man of Galilee. By seeking knowledge of Him 
we find grace sufficient. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. J. NEWTON. 

REPORT ON PUBLIC MORALS 

If in the church you say anything about Liquor the Wets say 
you are bringing politics into the church. 

Some say prohibition is a failure — Suppose the wets would have 
spent as much money and time to make it a success as they have to 
make it a failure? What would it have been? 

Anybody has a right to be a wet or a dry; but no one that takes 
the wrong side of any Moral Issue has a right to ask his or her 
church to lower its standard of morality to embrace his or her evil 
actions 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



29 



Christ did not establish his church for the world, but for the 
people, who live apart from the world. 

God invites us to follow him, but does not compel us to do so. 
When we open the doors of our churches to those who have not 
forsaken the world we are lowering God's standard. 

One of two words will describe any person who favors the liquor 
traffic. "Greed or Appetite." 

Forget every word I may say if you will, but do not say that I 
am talking politics. 

Listen to these words of some of our great men: 

Great Men Against Whiskey 

Benjamin Franklin — "Some of the domestic evils of intemper- 
ance are houses without windows, gardens without fences, fields 
without tillage, barns without roofs, children without clothing, prin- 
ciples, morals or manners." 

Thomas Jefferson — "Whiskey kills one-third of our citizens and 
ruins their families." 

Abraham Lincoln — "The liquor traffic is a cancer in society, 
eating out the vitals and threatening destruction, and all attempts 
to regulate it will not only prove abortive, but will aggravate the 
evil; there must be no attempt to regulate the cancer; it must be 
eradicated; not one root must be left behind." 

President McKinley — "By legalizing the traffic, we agree to 
share with the liquor seller the responsibilities and evils of his busi- 
ness." 

President Taft in 1906 declared himself a total abstainer and 
told young men it was the best plan, and in December, 1908, at a 
banquet he turned his glass down and said, "It is going to stay down 
forever." 

Abraham Lincoln — "The legalized liquor traffic is the tragedy of 
civilization." 

"What is evil should not only be detected and defeated, but de- 
stroyed." 

"The saloon has proven itself the greatest foe, the most blight- 
ing, withering curse of our modern civilization." 

"Legalizing the manufacture of intoxicating liquors as a bever- 
age is wrong— as all history and every development of the practice 
proves it to be — a moral, social and political wrong." 

"The saloon and liquor traffic have defenders, but no defense.". 

General W. H. Harrison, when a candidate for President of the 
United States, made this statement: "I am one of a class of seven- 



30 



MINUTES OF THE 



teen young men who graduated, and the other sixteen filled drunk- 
ard's graves, all through the pernicious habit of wine drinking." 

Bob Ingersoll was an infidel but he never stooped low enough -;o 
defend liquor. He said: 

In speaking to a jury in a case which involved the manufacture 
of alcohol: "I am aware that there is a prejudice against any man 
engaged in the manufacture of alcohol. I believe that from the time 
it issues from the coiled and poisonous worm in the distillery until 
it empties into the hell of death, dishonor and crime, that it demo- 
ralizes everybody that touches it, from its source to where it ends. 
I do not believe anybody can contemplate the subject without be- 
coming prejudiced against that liquor crime. 

"All we have to do, gentlemen, is to think of the wrecks on 
either bank of the stream of death; of the suicides, of the insanity, 
of the poverty, of the ignorance, of the destitution, of the little chil- 
dren tugging at the weary breasts of weeping and despairing wives, 
asking for bread; of the talented men of genius it has wrecked, the 
men struggling with imaginary serpents, produced by the devilish 
thing; and when you think of the jails, the almshouses, of the asy- 
lums, of the prisons, of the scaffolds upon either bank, I do not 
wonder that every thoughtful man is prejudiced against this stuff 
called alcohol." 

The moving picture business has probably done more to lower 
the morals of our country than any other agency, unless it be liquor. 

SAM J. SMITH. 

33. Grover C. Palmer reads the Report of the Com- 
mittee on Time, Place and Preacher, which is adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 
FOR 1934 SESSIONS 

Place— Jersey, P. O. Lin wood Route 2. 

Time— Tuesday and Wednesday after the first Sunday in Sep- 
tember, 1934. 

Preacher — L. S. Gaines, P. O. Lexington, N. C. 
Alternate— Walter Warfford, P. O. Lexington, N. C. 

FOR SPRING SESSION 

Time— April 27, 1934 (Friday before 5th Sunday in April, 1934) 

Place— Welcome, P. O. Welcome, N. C. 

Preacher— C. R. Johnson, P O. Erlanger, N. C. 

G. C. PALMER, 
J. W. KINNEY, 
L. E. TEAGUE, 
Committee on Time, Place and Preacher. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



31 



84. Sam^J. Smith reads the Report of the Commit- 
tee on Nominations, which is adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS 

Chairman of Associational Advisory Committee: Rev. W. L. 
Warfford, Lexington, N. C. 

Orphanage Representative: Miss Mary Misenheimer, Lexington, 
N. C. 

For Committee Appointed to Prepare Reports for Next Session 
See Page 5 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE FOR 1934 



Rev. R. N. Huneycutt Salisbury, N. C. Rt. 7 

R. D. Covington and L. E. Teague Thomasville, N. C. 

W. L. Warfford, Sam J. Smith, G. W. Miller Lexington, N. C. 

COMMITTEE ON DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS FOR 1934 

Walter L. Warfford and Sam J. Smith Lexington, N. C. 

Miss Elizabeth Smith Linwood, N. C. 

Prevette Westmoreland Thomasville, N. C. 

35. Upon motion it was voted by the body that any 



churches which had not done so, be allowed to elect a 
member of the Associational Advisory Committee. 

36. Jesse W. Dickens, of Lexington, N. C. R. 6, was 
nominated and elected as secretary of the Association- 
al Advisory Committee. 

37. A collection was taken for the benefit of the 
State United Dry Forces. The amount received was 
$4.18. 

38. Sam J. Smith read the report as Treasurer of the 
Association, which was adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT— LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 
Last Sunday in August, 1932, to Last Sunday in August, 1933 

RECEIPTS 



Abbotts Creek $ 6.00 

Carolina Avenue 4.25 

Center Hill 2.50 

Churchland 6.50 



32 



MINUTES OF THE 



Denton 6.50 

Gravel Hill 1.00 

Holloways 2.25 

Jersey 3.00 

Lexington 26.00 

Liberty 4.00 

Lick Creek 2.50 

New Friendship 5.00 

Mills Home 12.00 

Fleeds 5.00 

Rich Fork 5.00 

Smith Grove 4.00 

Southside 2.00 

Stoners Grove 5.00 

Summerville 2.00 

Tabernacle 7.00 

Taylor's Grove 1.00 

Tbomasville 16.00 

Wallburg 5.00 

Walters Grove 

Welcome 3.00 

Westfjeld 

Sheets Memorial 5.G0 



Total Receipts $141.50 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Lexington Book & Sta. Co. for Card Board and Ink $ .75 

Express on Minutes 2.83 

Postage 4.12 

Charity & Children, Printing Programs 4.00 

Paid Clerk, balance due on 1932 account 4.36 

Paid Economy Printing Co. for printing Minutes 100.00 

Retained for my service as Clerk 25.44 



Total Disbursements $141.50 

Balance due Sam J. Smith, Clerk $4.56 

SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer. 

39. Rev. E. C. Roach read the Report of the Com- 
mittee on Obituaries, which was adopted. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES 

See Page 34 

40. The following resolution Was offered by Sam J. 
Smith and was adopted. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



33 



RESOLUTION OF THANKS 



Resolved: That we hereby extend to the pastor, Rev. S. B. Wil- 
son, the members of Lick Creek church and other friends of the 
community our sincere thanks and gratitude for their gracious en- 
tertainment and hospitality during the sessions! of this one hundred 
and first assembly of this body. 

We deeply revere the history, which has been made on these 
sacred grounds during the last 150 years. 

We congratulate the members and friends of this church for 
their sacrificial devotion to God in the erection of their new and 
splendid building. 



41. Rev. S. B. Wilson, pastor of the Lick Creek 
Church, made a statement, thanking the Methodist 
people and other friends of the community for their 
assistance in entertaining the Association. 

42. Prayer and benediction by Rev. John A. Sum- 
The Association adjourned at 4:00 P. M. 



SAM J. SMITH. 



SAM J. SMITH, 
Clerk. 



G. W. MILLER, 
Moderator. 



IN REMEMBRANCE OF 


THOSE WHO HAVE ANSWER- 


ED THE ROLL CALL SINCE OUR LAST SESSION 


"Blessed are the dead, which die in the Lord" 


"In My Father's House are Many Mansions" 


ABBOTTS CREEK: 


NEW FRIENDSHIP: 


Miss Lou Hayworth 


Mr. Marvin Adams 


Mrs. Eliza Jane Raper 


Miss Phoebe Elizabeth 


Mrs. Mary Hine 


Mendenhall 


CENTER HILL: 


REEDS: 


Mr. John F. Owen 


Mr. Charles Benson 


CAROLINA AVENUE: 


RICH FORK* 


Mrs. W. H. Evans 


TVTl*c Fnc^ina rf^l in o **/■! 

1V1XS. r OSI111C l^illiSLTQ. 


DENTON: 




Mrs. J. T. Noce 


SOUTHSIDE: 


Mrs. Sarah Adderton 


Mr. Clifford Godfrey 


HOLLO WAYS: 


STONERS GROVE: 


Mrs. Alpha Koonts 


Mr. Earlie Wrenn 


Mrs. Amanda Wachter 


SUMMERVILLE: 


Mrs. Cora L. Cross 


Mrs. Cornelia Bean 


Mrs. Phoebe Shirley 


Mrs. J. I. Peacock 


Mr Wiilip Smith 


Mrs. Louise Beck 


JERSEY: 


Mrs. Mollie Gallimore 


Mr. John H. Feezor 


Mr. Wilbur Gallimore 


LEXINGTON: 


Mrs. Clara Bailey 


Mr. C. C. Shugart 


Mrs. Lina Carrick 


Mrs. W. H. Aaron 


Mr. W. C. Daniel 


LIBERTY: 


Mr. D. D. Davis 


Mr. Charlie O. Hepler 


TABERNACLE: 


Mrs. Clara Grubb 


Mrs. W. S. Allen 


Mrs. Louella Black 


WELCOME: 


Miss Bertha Miller 


Mr. Robert Sowers 


LICK CREEK: 


WALTERS GROVE: 


Mrs. Delilah Reid 


Miss Marinda Pierce 




E. C. ROACH, 




S. A. SHARPE, 




E. L. BRADLEY, 




Committee on Obituaries 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



35 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist 
Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this association to furnish the 
gospel (as we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the asso- 
ciation, and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention. 
MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the as- 
sociation, pastors of the churches in the association, and messengers 
from the churches. Each church shall be entitled to three messen- 
gers and one additional messenger for every 50 members or fraction 
thereof over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, 
vice-moderator, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected 
each year by the association at its annual meeting and shall hold 
office until their successors are elected. The duties of the officers 
shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in like organiza- 
tions, or as defined by the association from time to time. 

BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee 
each year whose duties shall be to look after having the gospel 
preached in all parts of the association, and to attend to all busi- 
ness in the association between the sessions and to make such re- 
ports as they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the associa- 
tion. The association may appoint or elect such other boards or 
committees from time to time as circumstances may require. 
TIME OF MEETING 

Article 6. The association shall meet annually, on Tuesday after 
the first Sunday in September. The moderator may at the request 
of the Executive Committee change the time or the place of meeting 
of this association when it may be deemed by him not expedient to 
meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive Com- 
mittee may fill any vacancy occurring between meetings of the as- 
sociation. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular ses- 
sion of the association by a two- thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules 
of Order for Parliamentary Authority. 



36 



MINUTES OF THE 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Year 



WHERE HELD 



PREACHER 



MODERATOR 



CLERK 



Uamestown 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty- 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting H 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 

3Big Creek 

Uamestown 
Liberty 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 

New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
| Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3Big Creek 
2Pine Meeting - H 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 

Jersey 
4M?uddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

Summerville 

Lexington 

Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H 

High Point 

Kernersville 

Holloways 

Pleasant Grove 

Denton 
5Piney Grove 

Rich Fork 

Abbotts Creek 
| Reeds X Roads 



Geo. W. Purefoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Eli Carroll 
Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 

Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stokes 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wingate 
H. Morton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. F. Redd 
C. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvey Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H. Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 
J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J. K. Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 



Wm. Bureh 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tussey 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
H. Morton 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 



Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
by Civil War 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



37 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



WHERE HELD 



PREACHER 



MODERATOR 



CLERK 



Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Paul C. Newton 
Paul C. Newton 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 



Lexington 
Lick Creek 
Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H 
New Friendship 
Thomasville 
Wallburg 
Denton 
Liberty 
Orphanage 
Abbotts Creek 
Stoner's Grove 
Rich Fork 
Holloways 
Center Hill 
Wallburg 
Smith Grove 
Lexington 
Denton 

New Friendship 

Churchland 

Summerville 

Abbotts Creek 

Reeds 

Liberty 

Rich Fork 

Thomasville 

Holloways 

iStoner's Grove 

Abbotts Creek 

Denton 

Lexington 

Lick Creek 



C. A. G. Thomas 
Henry Sheets 
W. A. Smith 
Geo. P. Harrill 
John R. Miller 
J. S. Farmer 
Dr. R. T. Vann 
M. L. Kesler 
S. D. Swaim 
O. A. Keller 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
M. L. Kesler 

G. A. Martin 

0. A. Keller 

1. M. Mercer 
Fred D. Hale 
M. L. Kesler 
R. E. White 

J. S. Hardaway 
M. L. Kesler 
W. A. Hough 
W. L. Barrs 
C. H. Trueblood 
C. A. Owens 
E. N. Gardner 

H. T. Penry 
M. L. Kesler 
J. M. Hayes 
M. L. Kesler 

M. O. Alexander 
G. A. Martin 
E. F. Mumford 



James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
J. W. Nowell 
J. W. Nowell 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
G. A. Martin 
O. A. Keller 
O. A. Keller 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 



Now High Point; 



2 Now Churchland; 



3 Now Eldorado; 



4 Now Clemmonsville; 



5 Now Wallburg 



38 



MINUTES OP THE 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE W. M. U. OF THE 
LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

The Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Association held 
its twenty-seventh annual meeting with the society of the Wallburg 
Church on April 21, 1933. The session began at ten o'clock with Miss 
Sallie L. McCracken, the Superintendent, presiding. The hymn, "All 
Hail the Power of Jesus Name," was sung and the pastor, Rev. Ira 
D. Ferguson, led in prayer. Mrs. A. R. Gallimore led the devotional 
using Luke 5:1-11. She stressed the great need of Christians turn- 
ing away from worldliness and launching out into a deeper spiritual 
life. Rev. E. F. Mumford led in prayer. Miss Mary Frances Hay- 
worth sang beautifully "Just for Today." Miss Lena Tuttle gave the 
Union a very hearty welcome and Mrs. E. Lee Fox gave a fitting re- 
sponse At this time the Union recognized the visitors, Mrs. J. J. 
Roddick and Mrs. J. S. Slate, of the Pilot Mountain Association, Miss 
Alva Lawrence, State Young People's Leader, and Mrs. Davison, of 
Georgia. 

Reports of officers were given as follows: 

Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Personal Service Chairman, reports good 
work done by some of the societies, but on account of the fact that 
a number of the societies did not report to her she could not give 
a complete record. 

Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Associational Young People's Leader, reported 
the organization of four new societies, literature sent to Sunbeam 
Band eight months, correspondences and visits with other churches, 
and two Father and Son banquets held with R A.'s in the associa- 
tion. She emphasized the great influence that grownup and older 
people have in shaping the lives of children. Mrs. Redwine offered 
her resignation to take work in the Intermediate Department of the 
Sunday School. 

Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Mission Study Chairman, being absent, the 
Superintendent read the report. It showed that 28 classes were held 
with an enrollment of 299. Awaids were: 

No. W. M. S. Rcord Cards No. 1 21; No. 2 11; Reading Cards 1. 

No. W. M. S. Small Seals 157; Official Seals 2. 

No. W. M. S. Certificates for Official Seals 44. 

No. Reading Stamps W. M. S. 1; Y. W. A. 10. 

No. Certificates Y. W. A. 3; G. A. 19; R. A. 13; S. B. 27. 

No Seals Y. W. A. 12; G. A. 29; R. A. 5; S. B. 92. 

Our Superintendent, Miss McCracken, reports letters written, 
150, cards 17, visits to societies 7, miles traveled 806. Attended State 
W. M. U. Convention and State Convention. There are at the close 
of the year 1932, 62 societies in 19 churches. This leaves seven 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



39 



churches with no society at all. We have 7 full graded Unions: 
Lexington, Stoner's Grove, Tabernacle, New Friendship, Thomasville 
and Wallburg. There are 7 A-l societies which is one more than we 
had last year. We gave more than our apportionment in 1931 and 
also in 1932. Last year we gave $5,535.21. For 1933 we are asked to 
make an increase of ten per cent, or $6,075.00. Miss McCracken 
urges that the societies accept this apportionment and that the so- 
cieties press forward in their gifts and in Mission Study. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

Balance in treasury Jan. 1, 1932 $13.67 

Received for Associational expense 27.50 



Total $41.17 

DISBURSEMENTS 

To Mrs. George Green for traveling expense $ 5.00 

To Mrs. P. S. Vann for expense of Charlotte Division 5.00 

To Mills Home for Programs 2.00 

To Miss Sallie L. McCracken for postage 10.50 

To Miss Sallie L. McCracken for postage 10.00 

Tax on checks 04 



Total $32.54 

Balance in treasury $8.63 



The treasurer gave also the financial record of the socities for 
the year. Representatives from the churches were recognized in 
this connection. 

Mrs. R. S. Green, Associate Superintendent, gave interestingly 
the history of the year's hymn, "Jesus Calls Us." Mrs. I. P. Frazier 
presented the work of the W. M. U. Training School, speaking of the 
great work being done by training school students on mission fields 
and urging that we make use of it in training workers for our home 
churcl.es. Mrs. M. O. Alexander spoke of the Margaret Fund. This 
was a very tender message and full of information. At this time 
Rev. A R. Gallimore, returned Missionary to China, gave an address. 
His subject was "A Day's Work in My China Mission." His message 
was so vivid that for the short while that he spoke we almost imag- 
inea that we were really spending a day in China instead of at Wall- 
bur^f — and a busy day it was. The different committees were now 
appointed. Adjourned for dinner. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Afternoon session was begun with the singing of the hymn, 
"Se^d the Light." Mrs. W. H. Johnson led the devotional reading, 
John 15:1-15, and Miss McCracken led in prayer. Mrs. G. A. Mar- 



40 



MINUTES OF THE 



tin presented our Missionary Magazines, making it very interesting 
by using a playlet, "Missionary Clinic." We were then entertained 
by two of the Wallburg G. A.'s, Miss Lanning and Miss Pardue, using 
a reading, "To a Violin" and duet "The Old Church Choir." Dr. G. 
C. Lumpkin spoke of the work and the needs of the Baptist Hos- 
pital. Miss Alva Lawrence spoke very forcefully on "The Impor- 
tance of Training Our Young People," emphasizing enlistment, 
prater, patience. At this point Mrs. Gallimbre, who is especially in- 
terested in the R. A.'s of the association, speaks out of a full heart 
of the necessity of having men to help in this work, to which the 
Pastors present pledge their cooperation. Miss McCracken recom- 
mends the plan of holding a Summer Session for the young people 
of the association. Mrs. I. G. Greer discussed very ably the value 
of Mission Study from the point that Missions is the heart of the 
Gospel. 

Reports of Committees were as follows: 

TIME AND PLACE 

The committee composed of Mrs. E. R. Lanning, Mrs. Farris 
Swaim and Mrs. C. C. Pritchard decided on Reeds Church and Fri- 
day, April 22, for the 1934 meeting. 

NOMINATIONS 

Superintendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Supt., Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, R. 6, Winston- 
. Salem, N. C. 

Junior Superintendent, Miss Elizabeth Smith, Linwood, N. C. 

Mission Study Leader, Mrs. W. J. Griffin, R. 4, Winston- Salem, 
N. C. 

Personal Service Chairman, Mrs. C. C. Pricthard, Thomasville, 
N. C. 

The nominating committee was composed of Mrs. A. J. Warf- 
ford, Mrs. E. Lee Fox, Mrs. R. O. Hedrick, Mrs. M. O. Alexander and 
Mrs. W. W. Scott. 

The courtesy committee composed of Mrs. G. A. Martin, Mrs. W. 
A Shoaf and Mrs. D. J. McDonald submit the following report: 

The Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Association wish 
to thank the pastor and the women of the Wallburg Church for their 
most cordial hospitality nd their delicious and bountiful dinner. The 
Young People's programs were interesting and entertaining. We 
appreciate the sane, stirring messages from our missionaries, Rev. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



41 



and Mrs. A .R. Gallimore. Our hearts burned within us as Dr. 
Lumpkin told of the needs of our Baptist Hospital. We thank Miss 
Alva Lawrence for her inspiring message of enlistment. We are in- 
debted to Mrs. M. M. Smith for the splendid financial chart of our 
association. We desire to express our gratitude to our capable, con- 
secrated leader, Miss Sallie McCracken, who patiently for Christ's 
sake keeps on keeping on. Mission study by Mrs. I. G. Greer made 
us love our missionaries more, and I think, each of us resolved to 
be more loyal to Him who gave up all that we might live with Him. 
We are grateful for the presence of our visitors, Mrs. Roddick, Mrs. 
Slate, Mrs. Davison and others. 

OBITUARIES 

This committee, which was composed of Miss Etta Teague, Mrs. 
C. R. Johnson and Mrs. R. G. Jennings report the death of Mrs. 

of Tabernacle Society, Mrs. 

Phoebe Shirley and Mrs. Josie Wall, of Holloways. 

The closing devotional was conducted by Rev. Walter Warfford 
who used as his subject "Jesus' Charge to His Disciples." This was 
a good message and closed a great meeting. Rev. I. G. Greer led in 
the closing prayer. 

CHURCH DIRECTORIES 
Pastors of the Various Churches 



Name Address Church Member of 

Alexander, M. O., Thomasville, N. C Thomasville 

Barringer, C. D., Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 2 Smith Grove 

Bradley, Earl L., Spencer, N. C Churchland 

Clark, Ben F., Thomasville, N. C Carolina Avenue 

Dix, O. P., High Point, N. C Gravel Hill 

Ferguson, Ira D., Mt. Airy, N. C Wallburg 

Gaines, L. S., Lexington, N. C Lexington 

Hanes, J. H, Belews Creek, N. C Westfield 

Hunt, Howard, Star, N. C, R. F. D. 1 Walters Grove 

Honeycutt, R. N., Salisbury, N. C, R. F. D. 7 Jersey 

Johnson, C. R., Erlanger, N. C, Box 183 Tabernacle 

Mason, B. K., Winston- Salem, N. C, Box 2030 New Friendship 

Martin, G. A., Denton, N. C Denton 

McMillan, John Arch, Thomasville, N. C Mills Home 

Mumford, E. F., Wallburg, N. C Abbotts Creek 

Penry, H. T., Southmont, N. C Stoners Grove 

Pickler, J. M., Albemarle, N. C Taylors Grove 

Roach, E. C, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 ...Reeds 



42 



MINUTES OP THE 



Warfford, Walter L., Lexington, N. C., Box 122 Sheets Memorial 

West, Richard L., Thomasville, N. C Southside 

Wilson, S. B., High Point, N. C Lick Creek 

Ordained Ministers Holding Membership in the Association, Who 
Are Not Pastors: 

Name Church Member of Address 

Bishop S. (Retired) Tabernacle Lexington, N. C. Rt. 4 

Caldwell, R. N. (Inactive) Taylors Grove New London, N. C. Rt. 2 

Cross : Gilmer (Student) Lexington Lexington, N. C. 

Darnell, W. C. (Inactive) Tabernacle Erlanger, N. C. 

Eddinger, Clyde (Student) Rich Fork Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1 

Gallimore, A. R. (Missionary) Lexington Canton, China 

Brown, Holt (Student) Center Hill Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6 

Haynes, Grady (Student) Tabernacle Erlanger, N. C, Box 114 

King. J. M. (Inactive) New Friendship.. ..Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 5 
Newton, J. D. (Retired) Thomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

ASSISTANT PASTORS AND EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 

Rev. Walter L. Warfford, Assistant Pastor First Baptist Church, 
Lexington, N. C. 
No Church in the Association has an Educational Director 

B. Y. P. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 



President — Walter L. Warfford Lexington, N. C. 

Vice-President — Clyde Eddinger Thomasville, N. C. 

Secretary — Miss Eva Jones Thomasville, N. C. 

Chorister — Jack Freeman Thomasville, N. C. 

Pianist— Virginia Fritts Lexington, N. C. 

Junior- Intermediate Leader — Miss Vera Ruth Thomasville, N. C. 

District Leaders 

Thomasville District — Mrs. Cy Howell Thomasville, N. C. 

Lexington District — Miss Esther Hutchins Lexington, N. C. 

Denton District — R. O. Hedrick Denton, N. C. 



B. Y. P. U. PRESIDENTS, LEADERS AND DIRECTORS 

CAROLINA AVENUE— 

W H. Beusse, Thomasville, N. C, Director. 
George Poole, Thomasville, N. C, President Adult Union. 
Mrs. A. J. Lowe, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Intermediate Union. 
H D. Bradshaw, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Junior Union. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



43 



CENTER HILL— 

Holt Brown, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6, President Senior Union. 

CHURCHLAND— 

Carl W. Young, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1, President Senior Union. 
Freeda Barnes, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1, Leader Junior Union. 

DENTON— 

A. L. Snider, Denton, N. C, Director. 

Miss Mary Snider, Denton, N. C, President Senior Union. 
R. O. Hedrick, Denton, N. C, Leader Intermediate Union. 
Miss Sarah Martin, Denton, N. C, Leader Junior Union. 

^SEY- 

Charles Penniger, Linwood, N. C, President Senior Union. 
Miss Nannie Smith, Linwood, N. C, Leader Intermediate Union 
Miss Elizabeth Smith, Linwood, N. C, Leader Junior Union. 

LEXINGTON— 

H. M. Fulcher, Lexington, N. C, Director. 

Mrs. A. B. Misenheimer, Lexington, N. C, Box 16, Pres. Adult U. 
Fred Golightly, Lexington, N. C, President Senior Union. 
Miss Gertrude Martindale, Lexington, Leader Int. Union. 
Miss Esther Hutchins, Lexington, N. C, Leader Jr. Union No. 1. 
Miss Ruth Meachum, Lexington, N. C, Leader Jr. Union No. 2 

LIBERTY— 

L. V. Miller, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 3, President Adult Union. 

B. J. May, Cid, N. C, Rt. 1, Director. 

Lacy Buie, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 3, Leader Int. Union. 
Mrs. L. V. Miller, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 3, Leader Jr. Union. 

MILLS HOME— 

Rev. J. A. McMillan, Thomasville, N. C, Director. 
J. C. Hawkins, Thomasville, N. C, President Senior Union. 
A. C. Lovelace, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Int. Union No. 1. 
Miss Arbutus McManus, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Int. U. No. 2 
Miss Lucille White, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Int. Union No. 3. 
Miss Lyda Beavers, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Jr. U. (Love) 
Miss Hudson, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Jr. Union (Loyalty) 
Miss Ethel Johnson, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Jr. U. (Faith) 

REEDS— 

Miss Elizabeth Patton, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3, Leader Jr. Union. 
RICH FORK— 

Wilford Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1, Pres. Senior Union. 



44 



MINUTES OP THE 



SHEETS MEMORIAL— 

Talbert I. Stroud, Lexington, N. C, Director. 

Mrs. Jessie Yarbrough, Lexington, N. C, President Adult Union. 

Mary Jenkins, Lexington, N. C, President Senior Union. 

Miss Agnes Hilliard, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6, Leader Int. Union. 

Miss Mattie Bean, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6, Leader Junior Union. 

SMITH GROVE— 

C L. Broadway, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1, Director. 
Miss Elizabeth Beck, Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 7, Pres. Senior Union. 
Miss Ruth Snider, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1, Leader Junior Union. 
Miss Irene Beck, Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 7, Leader Int. Union. 

T?1" 

SOUTHSIDE— 

Edd Epps, Thomasville, N. C, Director. 

Mrs. Isaline Byerly, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Junior Union. 

TABERNACLE— 

Mrs. Grady J. Haynes, Erlanger, Box 114, Director. 

Fred Brooks, Erlanger, President Senior Union. 

Rev. Grady J. Haynes, Erlanger, N. C, Box 114, Leader Int. U. 

Miss Lutella Hames, Erlanger, N. C, Leader Jr. Union No. 1. 

Miss Ruby Kinsey, Erlanger, N. C, Leader Jr. Union No. 2. 

THOMASVILLE— 

Paul Culp, Thomasville, N. C, Director. 

Miss Blanche Gant, Thomasville, N. C, President Senior Union. 
Mrs. Clyde Jones, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Int. Union. 
Mrs. L. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Jr. Union. 

WALLBURG— 

Miss Evangeline Pardue, Wallburg, N. C, Pres. Senior Union. 



Personal Service Chrm.— Mrs. C. C. Pritchard Thomasville, N. C. 

Mission Study Chrm.— Mrs. W. J. Griffin Winston- Salem, Rt. 4 



W. M. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 



Supt— Miss Sallie McCracken 

Associate Supt.— Mrs. R. S. Green.... 

See.-Treas.— Mrs. M. M. Smith 

Junior Supt. — Miss Elizabeth Smith. 



Thomasville, N. C. 

Thomasville, N. C. 

.Winston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 4 
Linwood, N. C. 



LOCAL PRESIDENTS 



Abbotts Creek— Mrs. N. R. Teague.., 
Carolina Avenue— Mrs. B. F. Clark. 
Center Hill— Mrs. R. B. Sheets 



.Kernersville, N. C. Rt. 1 

Thomasville, N. C. 

Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



45 



Churchland— Mrs. W. A. Hannah Linwood, N. C. Rt. 1 

Denton — Mrs. R. O. Hedrick Denton, N. C. 

HolJoways— Mrs. W. H. Johnson Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6 

Jersey— Mrs. C. A. Smith Linwood, N. C 

Lexington— Mrs. G. S. Hartzog Lexington, N. C. 

Liberty— Mrs. L. E. Hepler Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 3 

Mills Home— Mrs. I. P. Prazier Thomasville, N. C. 

New Friendship— Mrs. Maskey M. Smith....Winston-Salem, N. C. Rt, 6 

Reeds— Mrs. Alda Graver Lexington, N. C. Rt. 3 

Sheets Memorial— Mrs. Talbert Stroud Lexington, N. C. 

Smith Grove— Mrs. E. R. Lanning Linwood, N. C. Rt. 1 

Southside — Mrs. N. G. Goodin Thomasville, N. C. 

Tabernacle— Mrs. Paul Solomon Erlanger, N C. 

Thomasville— Mrs. M. O. Alexander Thomasville, N. C. 

Wallburg— Miss Etta Teague Wallburg, N. C, 

Y. W. A. COUNSELORS 

Holloways — Miss Elva Crook High Rock, N. C. Rt. 1 

Denton— Mrs. J. W. Davis Denton, N. C. 

Mills Home — Miss Grace Phelps Thomasville, N. C. 

New Friendship — Miss Farris Swaim Winston-Salem, N. C. 

1904 Waughtown Street 

Sheets Memorial — Mrs. Talbert Stroud Lexington, N. C. 

Smith Grove— Miss Elizabeth Beck Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 7 

Tabernacle— Miss Sarah Hames Erlanger, N. C. 

Thomasville— Miss Lois Johnson Thomasville, N. C. 

Wallburg— Mrs. C. V. Teague Wallburg, N. C. 

G. A. LEADERS 

Churchland — Miss Texie Sowers Linwood, N. C. Rt. 1 

Jersey— Miss Sadie Sharpe Linwood, N. C. 

Holloways— Miss Treva Dickens Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6 

Lexington— Miss Agnes Carrick Lexington, N. C. 

Mills Home— Mrs. R. D. Covington Thomasville, N. C. 

New Friendship — Mrs. Hardin Griffin Winston-Salem, N. C. Rt. 5 

Sheets Memorial — Mrs. R. O. Bowers, Mrs. Jack Byars, 

Lexington, N .C. 

Smith Grove — Mrs. A. H. Lassiter Linwood, N. C. Rt. 1 

Tabernacle — Miss Virginia Johnson Erlanger, N. C. 

Thomasville — Mrs. W. P. Westmoreland Thomasville, N. C. 

Wallburg— Miss Stella Cook Wallburg, N. C. 

R. A. LEADERS 

Churchland — Graham Barnes Linwood, N. C. Rt. 1 



46 



MINUTES OP THE 



Jersey— Claud Smith Linwood, N. C. 

Mills Home — Mrs. I. P. Prazier Thomasville, N. O. 

New Friendship— Mrs S. O. Hinkle Winston- Salem, N. C. Rt„ 5 

Sheets Memorial— Mrs. Spurgeon Ayers, Loyd Parr....Lexingtdn, N. C. 

Tabernacle— <Mrs. C. R. Johnson Eflanger, N. C. Box 183 

Wallburg — Miss Evangeline Pardue Wallburg, N. C. 

Thomasville — Mrs. C. M. Howell * Thomasville, N. C. 



SUNBEAM LEADERS 

Abbotts Creek— Miss Velna Teague Kernersville, N. C. Rt. 1 

Churchand — Mrs. Mary Barnes Linwood, N. C. Rt. 1 

Jersey— Mrs. Kenneth Lanning Linwood, N. C. 

Lexington — Miss Kathleen Westmoreland Lexington, N. C. 

Mills Home — Miss Mary Cook Thomasville, N. C. 

New Friendship— Mrs. Oliver F. Doty Winston-Salem, N. C. Rt. 5 

Sheets Memorial — Mrs. Tom Cooper Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6 

Smith Grove — Miss Irene Beck Salisbury, N. C. Rt. 7 

Southside— Mrs. Laura Leonard Thomasville, N. C. 

Tabernacle— Mrs. W. C. Darnell Erlanger, N. C. 

Thomasville— Mrs. R. G. Jennings Thomasville, N. C. 

Wallburg— Miss Blanche Cook Wallburg, N. O. 



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LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

MORTh CAROLIMA 



One Hundredth and Second 
Annual Session 

HELD WITH 

JERSEY BAPTIST CHURCH 

Linwood, Morth Carolina 
SEPTEMBER 4,-5, 1934 



The Next Session Will Be Held Tuesday and Wednes- 
day After the First Sunday in September, 
1935 With the Mills Home Church, 
Thomasville, N. C. 



INDEX 



Page 



Appointment of Committees 6 

Assistant Pastors and Educational Directors 22 

Auxiliaries — Associational 1 

Baptist Institutions Within Association 1 

Church Clerks 27 

Church Treasurers 28 

Churches and Messengers v 3 

Collection Special 9 

Committees: Associational Advisory 1 

Finance 6 

On Nominations 6 

Program for 1935 15 

To Report 1935 Chairman 1 

On Digest of Church Letters— 1935 15 

On Time, Place and Preacher 6 

Standing 1 

Constitution and By-Laws 18 

Deceased Members 17 

Directories: Associational 1 

Election of Officers 8 

Church 22 

B. Y. P. U 23 

Ordained Ministers 22 

R. A '. 24 

Sunbeams 24 

W. M. U 24 

Historical Table 19 

Oak Grove Mission 15 

Orphanage Representative 5 

Pastors of Association 22 

Pastors, New 3 

Proceedings, Associational 4 

Proceedings of W. M, U. Annual Meeting 20 

Reports: Religious Literature 5 

Associational Advisory Committee 15 

Committee on Nominations , 15 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 11 

Digest of Church Letters 7 

Education 12 

Foreign Missions 10 

Hospitals 12 

Home Missions 10 

Mills Home 5 

Public Morals 14 

Sunday Schools 8 

Treasurer 16 

W. M. U 9 

Resolution of Thanks 16 

Statistical Tables 25 

Sermon, Annual 6 

Spring Session 11 

Sunday School Superintendents 26 

Teague, Mrs. N. R 7 

W. M. U. Auxiliaries and Officers 23 



DIRECTORIES 



OFFICERS 

R. D. Covington, Moderator Thomasville, R C. 

G. W. Miller, Vice Moderator Lexington, N. C. 

Sam J. Smith, Clerk & Treas Lexington, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Rev. Wa'.ter L. Warfford, Chairman Lexington, N. C. 

D. S. Hayworth, High Point, N. C; D. L. Tysinger, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6; W. H. 
Lomax, Linwood, N. C, Rt. 1; A. L. Snider, Denton, N. C; Robert F. Russell, New 
Hope Academy, N. C; J. W. Dickens, Jr., Lexington, N C, Rt. 6; R. F. Barnes, 
Lexington, N. C, Rt. 5; CM. Wall, Lexington, N. C; B. J. May, Cid, N. C.| J. A. 
Kinney, High Rock, N. C; I. G. Greer, Thomasville, N. C; W. J. Griffin, Win- 
Eon-Salem, N. C. s Rt. 4; J. F. Fester, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3; W. R. Eddinger, 
Thomasville, N. C, Rt. 1; W. L. Smith, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 6; Lewis Barringer, 
Salisbury, N. C, c'o Rowan Mills; Edd Epps, Thomasville, N. C; C. C. Wrenn, 
Southmont, N. C; Frank Davis, Denton, N. C; Carl Haynes, Erlanger, N. C; John 
Epps, New London, N. C, Rt. 2; C. J. Stone, Thomasville, N. C; Miss Etta Teague, 
Wallburg, N. C; M. L. Craver, Welcome, N. C; J. C. Loflin, Fullers, N. C; W. M. 
Bausse, Thomasville, N. C. All pastors, the moderator and the Clerk of the Asso- 
tion are Ex-Officio members. 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES TO REPORT IN 1935 



Baptist Hospitals Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 

B. Y. P. U.s Williford Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 1 

Christian Education P. C. Newton, Thomasville, N. C. 

Foreign Missions Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 

Home Missions Miss Roxie Sheets, Lexington, N. C. 

Ministerial Relief B. K. Mason, Winston-Salem, N. C. Box 2030 

Mills Home C. M. Wall, Lexington, N. C. 

Public Morals and Law Enforcement J. A. Neilson, Thomasville, N. C. 

Religious Literature E. F. Mumford, High Point, N. C. Rt. 2 

State of the Churches L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N, C. 

State Missions Mrs. R. A. Allen, Denton, N. C. 

Sunday Schools A. C. Lovelace, Thomasville, N. C. 

W. M. U Mrs. Wm. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C. Rt 4 



ASSOCIATIONAL AUXILIARIES 

B. Y. P. U. 

No annual meeting was held during the last Associational year. President — 
Rev. Walter Warfford, Lexington, N. C. Secretary — Miss Eva Jones, Thomasville. 
N. C. 

W. M. U. 

Annual Associational Meeting was held with the church at Reeds, April 25, 
1934. Superintendent — Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. Associate Super- 
intendent — Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. Sec. -Treas. — Mrs. M. M. Smith, 
Wirston-Salem, N. C, Rt. 6. Junior Superintendent — Miss Elizabeth Smith, Lin- 
wood, N. C. Mission Study Chairman — Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Rt. 4. Personal Service Chairman — Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 
The Association has no annual Sunday School Convention. 

BAPTIST INSTITUTIONS LOCATED IN THE ASSOCIATION 
The Mills Home— Established 1885. General Manager — Hon. I. G. Greer, 
Thomasville, N. C. Treasurer — R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. C. Trustees — 
Chairman, B. W. Spillman, Kinston, N. C. Secretary, Rev. Thomas Carrick, High 
Point, N. C. 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY, STANDING COMMITTEES, 
REPRESENTATIVES, AUXILIARY MEETINGS, ETC. 
Associational Missionary or Other Paid Employees— None. Standing Commit- 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



3 



tees— None. Representative of Laymen's Movements— None. Auxiliary Meetings — 
The Association has no W. M. U. Auxiliary, Sunday School Convention, B. Y. P. U. 
Convention which meet at the same time or during the Association. Laymen's 
Movement — None. 

LIST OF MESSENGERS FOR 1934 SESSIONS 
As Listed on Church Letters 
ABBOTTS CREEK— W. D. Spurgeon, Miss Minnie Hayworth, Carrick Teague, 
Brady Green, John Welborn. 

CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. George McCaskill, Mrs. A. J. Lowe, Mrs. N. A. 
Gordon, W. H. Beusse, C. E. Perry. 

CENTER HILL— D. B. Hunt, H. L. Miller, Ray Owen, J. H. Thompson, W. J. 
Beck 

CHURCHLAND— C. R. Darr, Mrs. C. R. Darr, W. H. Lomax, S. A. Allred, W. 
Hanes Beck. 

DENTON— A. L. Snider, J. L. Snider, Dr. E. C. Clyatt, Mrs. E. C. Clyatt, Miss 
Lucille Lanning. 

GRAVEL HILL — Rev. J. A. Cox, J. O. Vuncannon, Mrs. J. O. Vuncannon, 
Sam Scarlett. 

HOLLOWAYS— Marvin Hedrick, B. R. Cross, J. A. McCarn. 

JERSEY— Mrs. Reid Smith, John Penninger, Jr., Mrs. C. A. Smith, Mrs. R. L. 
Palmer, J. T. Barnes. 

LEXINGTON— C. M. Wall, G. W. Miller, Sam J. Smith, Miss Roxie Sheets, 
P. A. Myers, Mrs. Sam J. Smith, David Smith, Mrs. D. S. Bennett, Rev. Gilmer 
Cross, Mrs. D. F. Conrad, Mrs. S. E. Miller, Mrs. B. F Lee, P. A. Myers, Jr., Helen 
Smith, Mrs. C. R. Sharpe, S. L. Owen. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. I. Z. Clodfelter, B. J. May, Mrs. L. E. Hepler, L. V. Miller, 
Lee Hepler. 

LICK CREEK— A. M. Cole, J. A. Kinney, H. C. Keever. 

MILLS HOME— I. G. Greer, C. C. McKoin, Mrs. B. F. Crutchfield, Miss Annie 
Hall, Mrs. Mattie Hardy. 

NEW FRIENDSHIP— Erastus Swaim, Jesse F. Griffin, Conrad F. Motsinger. 

REEDS— Frank Foster, N. C. Carter, Mrs. N. C. Carter, I. A. Myers, Mrs. Hil- 
liard Michael. 

RICH FORK— Mrs. Wilfred Eddinger, Miss Mozelle Clinard, Stimp Everhart, 
Rev. Clyde Eddinger, G. T. Everhart. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL— Spurgeon Ayers, Lloyd Maley, B. T. Privett, Edgar 
Gallimore, Mary Swing. 

SMITH GROVE— Mrs. C. L. Broadway, Jock Snider, Maud Snider, Dorothy 
Snider. 

SOUTHSIDE— Mrs. J. O. Maulden, Mrs. J. R. Brewer, J. E. Godfrey, Mrs. J. 

E. Godfrey, James Swinson. 

STONER'S GROVE— A. L. Stoner, Hugh Warfford, Mrs. A. F. Warfford. 
SUMMER VILLE — J. L. Carrick, Sam Buie, A. L. Frank. 
PINE KNOT— Frank Tysinger, Q. N. Bailey, Carlie Carrick. 
TABERNACLE— B. L. Hames, Mrs. T. B. Marlyn, Mrs. Grady Haynes, Mrs. W. 

F. Humphrey. 

TAYLORS GROVE— John Epps, John Henry Cranford, Miss Flotie Russell. 
THOMAS VILLE — J . M. Stone, E. A. Pegg, Mrs. R. S. Green, L. A. Bruton, L. 
E. Teague. 

WALLBURG— J. E. Motsinger, Lula Motsinger, H. F. Pardue. 
WALTERS GROVE— J. A. Gallimore, Mrs. J. A. Gallimore, Fletcher Loflin, 
Mrs. Fletcher Loflin, Earlie Klass. 

WELCOME— W. S. Disher, Mrs. W. S. Disher, J. F. Crotts. 

WESTFIELD— G. B. Loflin, Mrs. G. B. Loflin, H. C. Davenport, Mrs. H. C. 
Davenport, Mrs. R. A. Summey, R. A. Summey. 

NEW PASTORS RECEIVED AND WELCOMED INTO THE ASSOCIATION 

Rev. J. N. Bowman, pastor of Tabernacle Church, Erlanger, N. C. Rev. J. A. 
Cox, Central Falls, N. C, pastor of Gravel Hill Church. Rev. Howard Hunt, Cid, 
N. C, pastor of Walters Grove Church. Rev. L. J. Matthews, Wallburg, N. C, 
pastor of Wallburg Church. 



4 



MINUTES OF THE 




— of the— 



ONE HUNDRED AND SECOND ANNUAL SESSION 
LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Held With The 
JERSEY CHURCH 

LIN WOOD, N. C. 



FIRST DAY 

Tuesday, September 4, 1934 

1. The One Hundredth and Second annual session of the Liberty Baptist Asso- 
ciation convenes with the Jersey church, Linwood, N. C, Tuesday, September 4, 1934, 
at 9:45 A. M. 

2. The devotional service is led by Rev. E. C. Roach, pastor Jersey, Reeds and 
Welcome churches. He also gives a hearty welcome to the large crowd present. 

3. The Association is called to order by the Moderator for the transaction of 
business. 

4. Rev. Waiter L. Warfford, Chairman of the Program Committee, reads the 
order of business as outlined by his committee, which was adopted. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

Jersey Baptist Church, Linwood, N. C. 
September 4-5, 1934 
TUESDAY MORNING 
9:45— Devotional, Rev. H. T. Penry; 10:00— Reports of Program Committee; 
10:10 — Religious Literature, Rev. J. A. McMillan; 10:30 — Mills Home, Miss Myra 
Olive; 11:15 — Recognition of New Pastors, Visitors, Appointment of Committees; 
11:30— Sermon, Rev. Walter L. Warfford; 12:15— Lunch. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 
1:45— Devotional, Rev. J. N. Bowman; 2:00— Roll Call of Churches (One min- 
ute report by delegate of greatest achievement in church during the year); 2:30 — 
Digest of Church Letters, Rev. Walter L. Warfford; (Summary of year's achieve- 
ments — Blackboard); 3:15 — Sunday Schools, Conrad Motsinger; 3:40 — B. Y. P. U., 
Rev. Clyde Eddinger; 4:00 — Adjournment. 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 
9:45-JDevotional, Rev. R. D. Covington; 10:00— Election of Officers, Miscel- 
laneous Business, etc.; 10:15 — W. M. U., Mrs. I. P. Frazier; (Address by Mis. Ish- 
mael Negin) ; 10:45 — Co-operative Program: (Reading of Reports) State Missions, 
Miss Mary Misenheimer; Home Missions, Rev. E. F. Mumford; Foreign Missions, 
Mrs. R. S. Green; 11:30 — Missionary Address, Dr. Charles Leonard; 12:15 — Lunch. 
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 
1:45 — Devotional — Rev. S. B. Wilson; 2:00 — Co-operative Program: (Continued) 
Hospital (Report and discussion — 20 minutes), I. G. Greer; Christian Education 
(Report and discussion — 20 minutes), Rev. L. S. Gaines; Old Ministers Relief (Re- 
port and discussion — 20 minutes), Rev. M. O. Alexander; 3:00 — Public Morals and 
Law Enforcement, Sam J. Smith; 3:30 — Committee Reports, Business, etc.; 4:00 — 
Adjournment. 

5. Rev. J. A. McMillan reads the Report on Religious Literature, which on 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



5 



motion to adopt is discussed by Rev. B. K. Mason, pastor of New Friendship 
church, and Rev. J. M. Hillard, High Point, N. C, ja visiting minister. The report 
is adopted. 

BAPTIST PAPERS 

There is hardly a Baptist paper in the south that is self-supporting. All but 
three are owned by the denomination of the state in which they are published. At 
the end of the year the deficit is made up out of funds of the convention. (The 
deficit cn the Recorder is made up of its stockholders and Charity and Children 
does not have a deficit.) The deficit occurs in spite of the fact that the greater 
part of the information contained in the paper is paid for by the agencies furnish- 
ing that information. The Foreign Mission Board pays for a page, the Home Mis- 
sion Board pays for a page, the Sunday School Board uses much paid for space 
and the State Convention is a frequent buyer of space. That is, these various 
?gencies pay for the information and the papers are supposed to pass it on to the 
Baptists. But they do not. Only a small per cent of the Baptists get the informa- 
tion for the simple reason that they do no see the papers. 

The Baptist denomination has charged its papers to keep the people informed 
and the papers are not doing that, for the above stated reason. Why do our Bap- 
tist folks refuse to take Baptist papers? Are they dry and uninteresting? Only 
the faithful few take them and read them and when any cause is supported only 
by the faithful few there is something wrong, somewhere. When only the faithful 
few attend church service there is something wrong with the service and when the 
readers of a Baptist paper are reduced to the faithful few there is something wrong 
with the paper. We refuse to believe that the whole fault is with the people in 
either case. The combined circulation of the Biblical Recorder and Charity and 
Children is more than twice that of the Baptist papers of any other southern 
state, and yet they reach only a small minority of our people. 

It is usual to close a report on religious literature by urging our people to take 
the papers and read them. We would close this report with that exhortation if 
we thought that it would do any good but we have been doing that throughout the 
years and the number of readers steadily decrease. And yet our papers are vital 
to our whole program. 

j. a. McMillan. 

6. The Report on the Mills Home is read by Miss Myra Olive, which on mo- 
tion to adopt is discussed by Rev. J. A. McMillan, associate editor of Charity and 
Children, Rev. J. M. Hilliard, ex-treasurer of the Mills Home, Rev. M. O. Alexan- 
der, pastor of First church Thomasville, and I. G. Greer, Superintendent of the 
Home, and is adopted. 

MILLS HOME 

The large Mills Home family is made up of approximately 500 boys and girls 
and 65 workers from all over North Carolina. The children for whom the institu- 
tion exists are not the pick of the state, but the needy of the state. They are 
gathered from every kind of home where sin and sorrow has entered. It has been 
necessary to take some away from once happy homes because the bread-winners 
were taken from the family circle, and grim poverty compelled the little mothers 
to give up their dearest possessions to the training of other hands. In some cases, 
mothers are enabled through Mothers' Aid to keep their children, but many of 
them have to tear loose from them and place them in institutions. There is an- 
other type of child in the Mills Home which comes from homes which sin has 
broken up. Sometimes an intemperate father has killed all the love his wife and 
children had for him by allowing himself to be caught in the clutches of sinful 
habits. Crime has broken up the homes of some of the children, and they have 
been made to think of their parents with shame and regret, rather than with love 
and pride. Many children who were on the brink of ruin because of immoral sur- 
roundings have been rescued by the hands of these who cared enough for them to 
see them put into better environments. Other circumstances, over which the chil- 
dren themselves had not control, have sent them to the orphanage. 

Mills Home is trying to help children who come from these varied types of 
homes. The task of making good citizens of them is sometimes a difficult one. 



6 



MINUTES OF THE 



This, however, is the goal toward which the workers of the institution are striv- 
ing. In doing this, they are attempting to teach the children how to make right 
decisions. It would be impossible and unwise to put temptation out of their 
reach, but it is neither impossible nor unwise to teach them to choose between 
right and wrong. It is the hope of those who labor with the children at Mills 
Home that the training which they receive during these plastic days will enable 
them to wisely decide problems which they will face until their heads are grey and 
their eyes too dim to see the light of day. 

A family as large as that at Mills Home, of course, has to have material sup- 
port. It is impossible to run any institution without food, clothing and shelter, 
and unwise to run it without educational and spiritual raning. A mention of a 
few of the material supplies sent to the cottages each week will give some idea as 
to what is needed for such a group. It takes 14 bags of flour- for every week's 
supply, 500 pounds of sugar, 15 gallons of syrup, 192 pounds of butter, 277 cakes of 
soap, besides what is used in the laundry. 80 chickens are dressed on Saturday 
for Sunday's dinner, or, if beef is used, three-fourths of a cow is sent to the 
houses at one time. 150 gallons of milk are used every day. 

The expenses run high, but no child leaves the table hungry or goes without 
needed clothing. Faithful churches from this and other associations see that they 
do not. Yet there are a few churches which da not have a part in the once-a- 
month and Thanksgiving offerings. With every Baptist church in the state giv- 
ing regularly each month, climaxed with a special offering at Thanksgiving, the 
Home could stay out of debt, and supply the many material needs of the institu- 
tion. It would be most commendable for this, the home Association, to be the 
first 100 per cent Association making these gifts regularly. 

The needs of the Mills Home, then, are the same that they have always been: 
your sympathetic interest, prayers and regular giving. The work goes on with 
gratifying results, in the main. A close following up of the children would con- 
vince one that they have been in the majority of cases, lifted to much higher 
moral, spiritual, and even physical living than they knew before they came t o 
Mills Home. 

Any investment into the lives of these needy children will bring rich dividends 
to any individual or church, and will add glory to Him who said, "Suffer the little 
children to come unto Me." 

Respectfully submitted, 
MYRA OLIVE. 

7. Visitors recognized were as follows: Dr. Chas. Leonard, Missionary to China; 
Mr. and Mrs. Ishmael Negrin, Missionaries to Cuba; Rev. J. M. Hilliard, of the 
Piedmont Association; Rev. A. Lincoln Fultz, pastor of Main Street Church, High 
Point, N. C; Rev. C. M. Royals, pastor of Green Street Church, High Point, N. C; 
Rev. M. W. Gordon, pastor of First Church, Spencer, N. C. 

New Pastors: Rev. J. N. Bowman, pastor of Tabernacle Church, Erlanger; Rev. 
L. J. Matthews, pastor of Wallburg Church, Wallburg, N. C. 

8. The Moderator at this time makes the following committee appointments: 

ON FINANCE— G. C. Palmer, L. V. Miller, W. H. Lomax. 

ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER— R. D. Covington, P. A. Myers, Mrs. R 
A. Allen, Conrad Motsinger, Prevette Westmoreland. 

ON NOMINATION OF OFFICERS FOR 1935— D. S. Hayworth, C. M. Wall, 
Mrs. R. S. Green, John A. Kinney, J. A. McMillan. 

ON OBITUARIES— John Arch McMillan, C. M. Roach, C. R. Dodson, E. F. 
Mumford. 

ON REPORTERS FOR 1935—1. G. Greer, Miss Roxie Sheets, A. L. Snider, M. 
O. Alexander, Sam J. Smith. 

G. W. MILLER, Moderator. 
ANNUAL SERMON 

9. Rev. Walter L. Warfford, pastor of the Sheets Memorial church, preaches 
the annual sermon. His subject was "The Limiting Power of Unbelief," from 
Mark 6th chapter, 5th and 6th verses. The sermon was a mlasterful one and re- 
ceived much favorable comment. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7 



10. The body adjourned at 12:15 P. M. to reconvene at 1:45 P. M. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

11 The devotional is conducted by Rev. J. N. Bowman, pastor of Tabernacle 
church at Erlanger. 

12. At this time reports were had from the various churches, by a delegate 
from each one of the churches, as the roll call of the churches was made. 

Those making reports were as follows, for Abbotts Creek, D. S. Hayworth; Cen- 
ter Hill, Hugh L. Miller; Churchland, L. E. Rikard; Gravel Hill, Mrs. E. M. Russell; 
Holloways, B. R. Cross;; Jersey, Mrs. C. H. Smith; Lexington, C. M. Wall; Liberty, 
B. J. May; Lick Creek, J. A. Kinney; Mills Home, Mr. McKoin; New Friendship, 
Rev. J. M. King; Reeds, I. A. Myers; Rich Fork, Wilford Eddinger; Sheets Memo- 
rial, Spurgeon Ayers; Smith Grove, Mrs. C. L. Broadway; Southside, James S win- 
son; Stoners Grove, C. C. Wrenn; Summerville, Andrew Frank; Tabernacle, Rev. 
W. C. Darnell; Thomasville, Rev. M. O. Alexander; Wallburg, Prof. H. F. Pardeu; 
Welcome, M. L. Craver; Walters Grove, Earl Klass; Wiestfield, G. B. Loflin; Pine 
Knot, C. B. Carrick; Oak Grove, Marvin Hedrick. 

MRS. N. R. TEAGUE 

13. At this time Rev. E. F. Mumford calls attention of the body to the death 
of Mrs. N. R. Teague, a member of the Abbotts Creek church, who in her will left 
the sum of $500.00 to missions. 

14. Some special songs are rendered by the Jersey church choir at this time. 

15. Rev. Walter L. Warfford, pastor of the Sheets Memorial church, at this 
time makes the Report on Digest of Church Letters. 

In connection with this report he calls special attention to some facts set out 
by the large chart or black board on the wall, which was prepared by him and 
Sam J. Smith, the Clerk of the Body. This board gave figures showing what each 
church had done during the last year in a financial way. The report was adopted. 

REPORT ON DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS 

It is not the intention of this report to attempt an analysis of the spiritual 
condition of any church. I shall, on the other hand, give a brief analysis of our 
work in general as revealed in the digest of church letters. This digest will in- 
clude a review of enrollments and a digest of finance for both local and benevo- 
lent work. 

The digest of enrollments presents an interesting item. Lexington First 
Church leads in additions, 94, 51 coming by baptism. Sheets Memorial is second 
in total additions, 88, while it leads the Association in the number of baptisms, 
61. Others follow consecutively: Tabernacle, 53 additions, 28 by baptism; Mills 
Home 44 additions, 40 by baptism; Carolina Avenue, 34 additions, 30 by baptism; 
Southside 33 additions, 19 by baptism; Abbotts Creek 31 additions, 26 by baptism; 
Thomasville First Church, 31 additions, 16 by baptism; Walter's Grove 20 addi- 
tions. We made a total gain in church membership for the year of 468. The Sun- 
day School enrollments as reported show an increase for the year of 59. B. Y. 
P. U. enrollments show an increase of 31, yet there are 11 churches that have no 
B. Y. P. U. organization. W. M. U. enrollments total 1,497 showing a loss in mem- 
bership of 2. 

Our digest of finance presents another interesting item: For ourselves in 
the nature of local church work we raised $44,460.00, or $1,460.00 less than during 
1933. The interesting fact is that while we decreased our local finances, yet we 
gave more this year than last to both the Mills Home and the Co-operative Pro- 
gram. Every church in the Association made some contribution to both the Mills 
Home and the Cooperation Program during the year. 19 churches increased their 
contributions to the Cooperative program as compared with 1933. 18 churches 
and one Mission Sunday School increased their contributions to the Mills Home 
as compared with 1933. We gave $851.00 more to the Cooperative Program this 
year than last, while we gave $370.00 more to the Mills Home than in 1933. As a 
whole then, the digest reveals that we gave $1,221.00 more to Benevolence this 
year as compared with 1933, even though we did not raise as much for local work. 

As a whole, we look with favor and interest upon the gains in membership, the 



8 



MINUTES OF THE 



increases in Benevolent contributions, and look forward to the Association doing 
a greater work next year even than is reported in 1934. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER L. WARFFORD. 

16. The Report on Sunday Schools is brought by Conrad Motsinger, of Wall- 1 
burg, on motion to adopt it is discussed by I. G. Greer and is adopted. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

The possibilities of the Sunday School are unlimited. No other organization 
of the church has such wonderful opportunity. In every phase of Christian de-j 
velopment the Sunday School has a. direct part. From the time a child enters 
Sunday School he is taught to love and reverence God's house, to give to the sup-' 
port of the Lord's work, and above all to give his heart and life to the Lord Jesus 
Christ. After having done this he is taught to lead others in the work of the 
Master. 

In referring to our last year's minutes we note that there was nearly as much: 
given to benevolence through the Sunday Schools of Liberty Association as was; 
given through the churches. And out of 303 baptisms, 254 came through the Sun- 
day Schools. Indeed, this shows what a great work the Sunday Schools are! 
doing. But when we stop and think of the great numbers in reach of every 
church who are not in Sunday School we again say, "The possibilities of the Sun-'' 
day School are unlimited." Not until every soul has been saved and every person 
enlisted in Sunday School can we say our possibilities have been reached. 

We note too, from our last years minutes, a great need for trained workers.. 
Out of 28 Sunday Schools 13 did not report any teachers holding normal course I 
diplomas. And not a standard Sunday School in Liberty Association. We should 
all take advantage of the training course offered by the Baptist Sunday School 
Board to betteii prepare our lives for the great work in which we have been given 
a part. 

It seems too, that an Associational Sunday School Conference should be held 
at least once each quarter, bringing together all officers and teachers, seeking to 
promote greater work and to develop more efficient workers. Study to show thy- 
self approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed. 

CONRAD F. MOTSINGER. 

17. The association is lead in prayer by Rev. E. F. Mumford. 

18. The Body adjourns at 4:00 P. M. 

WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION 

19. The devotional is led by R. D. Covington, Treasurer of the Mills Home; 
during which he paid tribute to the pioneer Baptist heroes of this section. 

20. C. M. Wall makes the report of the Committee on the Nomination of Of- 
ficers at this time, which is adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE OFFICERS FOR 1935 

We make the following recommendations: 

FOR MODERATOR — R. D. Covington. 

FOR VICE MODERATOR— G. W. Miller. 

FOR CLERK AND TREASURER— Sam J. Smith. 

D. S. HAY WORTH, 

C. M. WALL, 

J. A. KINNEY, 

j. a. McMillan, 

Committee to Nominate Officers. 

21. On motion of C. M. Wall, a vote of thanks is extended by the Body to G. 
W. Miller, who has been Moderator for four years and to Sam J. Smith, who has 
been Clerk and Treasurer for eleven years for their tireless labors for the Asso- 
ciation and its welfare. 

22. The Report on W. M. U. is read by Mrs. I. P. Frazier of the Mills Home 
faculty. On motion to adopt the report, lessons on tithing were illustrated by 
three children from the Mills Home. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



9 



MR. AND MRS. ISHMAEL NEGRIN 

23. At this time Mrs. Ishmael Negrin, a home missionary for the Baptist de- 
nomination to Cuba, delivered what was perhaps the greatest address of the As- 
sociation. She brought tears to the audience as she related incidents on the 
Island. Her husband, who is a native of Cuba and also a missionary, also spoke. 

24. At the close of Mrs. Negrin's address a collection was taken for the mission 
cause in Cuba. The amount received was $24.19, which was turned over to Mrs. 
Negrin. 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

The Associational Meeting of the Woman's Missionary Union was held in April 
with the Reeds Church. There were sixteen churches represented and the reports 
showed that progress was being made. Mrs. Edna Harris and Mrs. Charles Leonard 
were our visiting speakers and brought splendid messages. Mrs. Harris used the 
Postage Stamp with its message of "I am ready" as the basis of her talk. Mrs. 
Leonard stirred our hearts as she told of the conditions in Harbin, China. The 
meeting next year will be with the New Friendship Church, Winston. Our effi- 
cient and untiring superintendent, Miss McCracken, was re-elected. 

Our hymn for the year is "All Hail the Power of Jesus Name." The watch- 
word is "Be strong and of good courage, for Jehovah thy God is with thee." 

We have twenty-eight churches in our Association and last year's reports 
show that eighteen of these have at least one missionary organization, while seven 
churches have all five organizations. This is good and we trust that this year's 
record will show that we have more churches with the full graded union. 

Would any pastor think it not worth-while to be present at the deacon's 
meeting or the Worker's Council? Why then cannot our pastors take time to be 
with the future deacons, Sunday School officers and teachers, in their Royal Am- 
bassador meetings? Our boys need consecrated men for counselors, especially the 
Intermediate Chapters. 

The R. A.'s of this state accepted the challenge to send Dr. Vance to Yang 
Chow, China, to the hospital whose doors have been closed for several years. 
Some responded nobly, but only $690.00 of the necessary $800.00 was raised and 
the W. M. U. executive committee finished out the needed amount from the Fan- 
nie Heck Memorial offering. 

Last year's reports show 1499 members of all missionary organizations and 
these gave to Missions, Education and Benevolences, $4,013.23, or an average of 
$2.67 each. The 6468 church members in the Association gave $11,014.32 to the 
same causes, or $1.70 per capita. If all had given in proportion to the W. M. U. 
members, this amount would have been $17,270 or about $6,255.00 more than we 
did give. 

A number of our people have realized the business-like way the 100,000 Dollar 
Club proposed to pay off the indebtedness of our Boards and have joined the 
ranks. There is still room for others and we trust that the goal will be reached 
and that 100,000 Southern Baptists will have a part in this extra and above offer- 
ing and be able to have a voice in that grand jubilee when we say "Our Boards 
are out of debt." 

For several years our State W. M. U. has fostered a Stewardship Contest, this 
first to be held in the local church, the winners then to conest at an Associational 
meeting, these winners to the Divisional Contest and finally a State Contest. Our 
Young People's leader, Miss Elizabeth Smith, made a heroic effort to hold an Asso- 
ciational contest this year, on August 19th, and while only two churches sent rep- 
resentatives, we feel that this small beginning will increase greatly next year, and 
the seed sown in the hearts of our Junior Organizations in the memorizing of 
these great facts on stewardship will bear much fruit in the future lives of our 
young people. 

MRS. I. P. FRAZIER. 

25. The Report on Home Missions was made by Rev. E. F. Mumford, pastor 
of Abbotts Creek church. 

The Report on Foreign Missions is made by Mrs. R. S. Green, of Thomasville. 
Both reports were adopted under the same motion. 



10 



MINUTES OF THE 



DR, CHARLES LEONARD 
After the adoption of these reports a most interesting, able and illustrative 
address on the mission work in Manchura was brought by Dr. Charles Leonard, 
who is a missionary for the denomination in that country. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

The Home Mission Board during the present year has operated under very 
trying financial conditions, but by practicing ceonomy it has been able to live 
within its income and in the year 1933 paid $61,346.92 on the principal of its debt 
and also added a few new missionaries. 

The missionaries with zeal and devotion have pushed the work and more bap- 
tisms have been reported than at any time in recent years. 

On account of the decrease in receipts the Board was forced on December 5, 
1933, to ask its creditors for an adjustment of its debts. The creditors complied 
with the request and an adjustment was made that extends the debts over a per- 
iod of five years with the privilege of paying the notes at the banks and retiring 
the bonds at any time without premium. 

In March of this year the Woman's Missionary Union while observing the 
week of prayer purposed to make an offering to Home Board. The offering began 
and grew until it had reached $88,873.49 on May 11. With this the Board could 
better carry on and was able to employ six new missionaries, thus giving the 
Board 26 new missionaries in all. 

The work in the Homeland under the guidance of J. W. Beagle has truly been 
favored of God. This work includes foreign-speaking people, the Indians, the 
negroes, the deaf and the work in the large cities. They report 2,797 won to Christ 
last year. 

The Home Mission work in Cuba under the guidance of Dr. M. M. McCall with 
his fellow-workers is very promising. The force consists of 30 ordained preachers 
including two Americans, six unmarried women, four of whom are American, and 
one unordained Cuban engaged in school work, and the wives of missionaries who 
give their time to mission work. 

The work is carried on through schools, churches, publications and evangelism. 
There were seven primary schools conducted during the year and a school of jun- 
ior high grade at one other point. The Cuban-American College has had a fairly 
good year and has met its own expenses except a small salary paid to the princi- 
pal. All other schools have been supported by local effort. There is a strong de- 
mand for seminary training, which was discontinued five years ago for lack of 
funds. 

The fields' needs are great, progress has been made, but many important 
towns and large country sections have never been touched by the Gospel. 

The mission work in Panama is chiefly confined to the Canal Zone. There 
are nine churches — one Balboa Heights Baptist church for white Americans — now 
self-supporting. The other eight churches are for the West Indian negroes 
brought to the Canal Zone from Jamaica during the construction days and who 
remained after the Canal had been completed. The churches for the colored 
Baptists have their own pastors. 

Through the work of the Home Mission Board and Jacob Gartenhaus, the 
Gospel is being carried to the Jews and many are accepting Christ. 

The words of Dr. J. B. Lawrence — "May Southern Baptists be wise in meeting 
the mission tasks in the homeland. God's Kingdom must come here if it would 
come in the world." 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. F. MUMFORD. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Over and over has the truism been repeated that information begets interest 
and interest begets inspiration which is followed by activity. This fact being es- 
tablished, surely we can see the need for more general information concerning the 
Missionary enterprise. Such information is readily supplied through the State 
organ of our denomination and Through our Missionary periodicals. 

From every foreign field comes the insistent plea for better support of the work. 
They tell of the crying needs for better equipment and for more workers to fill in 
the depleted ranks of those who have fallen or have been forced to give up because 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 11 



of ill health, but most of all do they plead that the work; and the workers be car- 
ried daily to the Throne of Grace on wings of prayer, and even to that plea we have 
turned deaf ears. 

Sadly have we seen a lethary creeping over our churches, an epidemic of sleeping 
sickness has been insidiously taking hold on the people called Missionary Baptists. 
We need to hear the clarion call of God's prophet of old as he says: "Awake, Awake 
put on thy strength, O Zion". 

In the days of Elijah when he was discouraged and ready to die, thinking that 
he was the only true servant of God in the land, he was rebuked and told that 
there was still a remnant who had not bowed the knee to Baal, and this has always 
been true. It is due to this remnant of faithful ones today who have kept alive 
the fires of devotion to the Missionary cause that the work has been saved from 
collapse. Nearly two thousand years have passed since the command was given 
the disciples to carry the gospel to all the world and stilj there are countless mil- 
lions who have never heard. 

Our gifts to missions constitute the measure of our concern for the salvation of 
the heathen. For several years these gifts dwindled down and down, until it al- 
most seemed that the faithful few were about to prove unfaithful. It is with joy 
and gratification that our Foreign Mission Secretary reports a turning of the tide 
since the beginning of this year of 1934. He says that this is "A day of good tid- 
ings". Since June 1, 1933 more than fifty missionaries have been adopted by in- 
dividuals and churches, over and above their regular gifts, an increase in offerings 
to this cause of at least $40,000.00. Thus the way has been opened for these faith- 
ful ones to return to their respective fields. About $25,000.00 has come to the 
Boaard from the 100,000 club and all of this has been applied on the debt, thus re- 
ducing both principal and interest. Fifteen new missionaries have been appointed 
to go to the places of greatest need. 

Truly "There is a sound of a going in the tops of the Mulberry trees" and it is 
time to bestir ourselves. Let ours not be a selfish religion that sees only the 
needs of a local church and is indifferent to the calls of those who cry "Come over 
and help us". 

Again let us heed the call "Awake, Awake, put on thy strength, O Zion" and let 
us go from strength to strength, undertaking great things for God and expecting 
great things from God. 

Respectfully submitted : 

MRS. R. .S. GREEN 

26. J. A. McMillan, chairman of the Committee on Obituaries makes the re- 
port of that committee at this time. 

While he read the names of the ones who have departed from us during- the 
last year and while Rev. E. F. Mumford offered prayer, the audience stood in 
honor of those who have died during- last Associational year. 

For names see page 17. 

27. The Body adjourns at 12:15 P. M. to reconvene at 1:45 P. M. 

WEDNESDAY EVENING SESSION 

28. The devotional is led by Rev. S. B. Wilson, pastor of the Lick Creek and 
Summerville churches. 

29. At this time Rev. Charles Leonard, missionary to Manchura, renders sev- 
eral songs in the Chinese language. 

30. The committee on Time, Place and Preacher make their report at this 
time, which is adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER FOR 
THE 1933 SESSIONS 

Place, Mills Home Church. Time, Tuesday and Wednesday after the first 
Sunday in September. Preacher, E. L. Bradley, Spencer, N. C. Alternate, E. C. 
Roach, Lexington, N. C, Route 3. 

FOR SPRING SESSION 
Time, April 26 (Friday before fifth Sunday in April, 1934). Place, Abbotts 
Creek. Preacher, M. O. Alexander, Thomasville, N. C. 

R. D. COVINGTON, CONRAD MOTSINGER, 

P. A. MYERS, PREVETTE WESTMORELAND, 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher. 



12 



MINUTES OF THE 



31. Rev. M. O. Alexander makes motion that since the next session is being 
held with the Mills Home church and it probably would not be proper to ask the I 
Mills Home, which is supported by the Baptists of the entire state, to feed thej 
Association, that the various delegates furnish and bring their own dinners, which I 
motion was adopted. 

32. Rev. J. A. McMillan reads the Report on Baptist Hospitals, which was! 
prepared by I. G. Greer, on motion to adopt the report was discussed by Smith I 
Hagerman, Supt. of the Baptist Hospital at Winston- Salem, N. C. 

HOSPITAL REPORT: A PARAPHRASE 

And behold, a certain messenger to the Liberty Association stood up and made 
trial of him, saying, Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? And he said 1 
unto him, What is written in your Bible? What does it say? And he answering; 
said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul,! 
and with ah thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbor as thyself.: 
And he said unto him: Keep on doing this, and thou shalt live. But he, wishing 
to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbor? Jesus made answer 
and said, There is; a house on the road that goes down from Jerusalem to Jericho 
called The Baptist Hospital. And by chance a certain pastor of a church in the I 
Liberty Association passed by that way on Mother's Day. He saw many who were 
rich within the house, but he pulled his pious coat around himself and passed by 
on the other side and his whole church followed him. And in like manner the 
superintendent of a Sunday School also, and when he and the members of the 
Sunday School saw the sick ones, they passed by on the other side. But a certain 
pastor who, with his people, journeyed that way last Mother's Day, stopped and 
looked upon the sick and the suffering and had compassion on them. He took an 
offering, which his people gladly made, and gave it to Mr. Smith Hagaman, the 
keeper of the house where the sick people lay, and said unto him, Take care of 
them; and whatsoever thou spendest more, we, when we come back again next 
Mother's Day, will repay thee. 

Which of these three, thinkest thou, proved neighbor to them that were sick? j 
And he said unto him, The preacher and the church that showed mercy unto \ 
the*. And Jesus said unto him, Go and do thou likewise. 

j. a. McMillan. 

33. The Report on Christian Education, in the absence of Rev. L. S. Gaines, 
of Lexington, who prepared the report was adopted without reading and was not 
discussed. 

ANNUAL REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION— LIBERTY BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION— Meeting with Jersey Baptist Church, September 4-5, 1934 

Baptists have always stood for Christian education. They have believed in 
the propagation of Baptist principles and Baptist ideals through a carefully co- 
ordinated system of secondary schools, academies, colleges and seminaries. The 
year 1934 has been a great centennial year. On June 9, 1934, William Carey, one 
of the prime leaders of the Modern Evangelical Missionary Movement, died in 
Serampore, India. Carey was the founder of Serampore College, a center of Bap- 
tist influence and classical learning which has influenced the life of India for 
nearly a century and a half. Charles Haddon Spurgeon, one of the world's prince- 
liest preachers, was born at Kelvedon, Essex, England, on June 19, 1834. In 1856 
Spurgeon founded his Pastors' College in London, a school which has trained many 
of England's most effective preachers for the last seventy-eight years. Every one 
of the renowned Baptist leaders whom we delight to honor in reverent memory 
have been friends and supporters of Christian Education. 

President W. H. P. Faunch of Brown University (Baptist) of Providence, R. I., 
writing in the Journal of the National Education Association in May of this year 
said: "An age of speedy change is a time of unprecedented opportunity. The 
world now is receptive to ideas. No longer stagnant and static, it is molten and 
fluid, running into the new molds that men shape for it. Our very danger is 
therefore our first chance. The swift changes that threaten us also summon us. 
The world is waiting for our message if we have any. It is alive and needs men 
to lead it. Let us not moan like the nerveless Hamlet: "The world is out of joint; 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



13 



O cursed spite, That ever I was born to set it right," but rather cry with Rupert 
Brooke, as he sailed to the hard campaign of Gallipoli: "Now God be thanked, 
Who has matched us with this hour." 

North Carolina Baptists have an enviable record in Christian Education, with 
the following schools and colleges with their enrollments for 1934: 

Wake Forest College, 872; Meredith College, 457; Mars Hill College, 454; Camp- 
bell College, 449; total, 2,232. 

These four institutions of Christian learning are supported through the North 
Carolina Baptist State Convention, and deserve the prayers and financial support 
of all our churches. Wake Forest College celebrated one hundred years of dis- 
tinguished service to the churches, the state, and the nation in June of this year. 
Other Baptist schools in the state which have rendered splendid service, and 
which are now supported by local communities are: Boiling Springs Junior Col- 
lege, Chowan College, Wingate Junior College and Fruitland Institute. 

Southern Baptists have gone, forward in an effective program of higher edu- 
cation for Preachers, Missionaries and Christian Workers, with the following in- 
stitutions, whose 1934 enrollments are shown below: 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky, 341; Southwest- 
ern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth, Texas, 376; Baptist Bible Institute, 
New Orleans, La., 222; W. M. U. Training School, Louisville, Ky., 60; American 
Baptist (Negro) Theological Seminary, Nashville, Tenn., 60. 

Believing in an educated and trained leadership in the churches, on the mis- 
sion fields, and for Christian citizenship, we Baptists are ever committed to the 
cause of Christian Education. Our fine institutions are worthy of our prayers, 
financial support, and the attendance of our finest young people. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS S. GAINES, Chairman. 

34. The Report on Ministerial Relief was made by Rev. M. O. Alexander, pas- 
tor of the Thomasville church. 

The report was adopted without discussion. 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF AND ANNUITIES 

The care of the aged and disabled ministers of our State was some years ago 
committed to the Relief and Annuity Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 
Dallas, Texas, and that Board has been carrying on successfully since 1918. 

Annuity Board has to provide benefits in all the States of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention and that the reduced giving on the part of our people greatly 
limits its ability to provide adequately and worthily for our veterans. Increased 
stipends can be provided only as increased gifts are made by our people. The bulk 
cf the money now in the custody of the Relief and Annuity Board, (all but $500,- 
000) is in the Annuity Department. The reason for this is that the funds held 
for annuities have not yet been heavily drawn upon while the relief beneficiaries 
have been paid to the limit of the Board's ability each month in every year since 
it was organized. It should also be understood that a large part of the resources 
of the Annuity Department consist of funds contributed by the minister members 
themselves with interest accumulations thereon. 

Larger contributions on the part of the churches are necessary if the Board 
is to be placed in a position to more worthily care for the beneficiaries of the Re- 
lief Department. 

"But what can we do? Not very much immediately; and yet, we might set 
about creating a deeper interest in the matter among our people. Manifestly, the 
mass of us have never shown any deep and sustained interest; not because the 
matter is not important but because other things crowd it out. We have special 
months for pressing the claims of State, Home and Foreign Missions and Educa- 
tion. I recall no such month for the Relief Board. And rightly enough, we have 
special days for the Orphanage and Hospital, but none for the Relief Board. And 
when did you ever preach, brother pastor, or hear any other pastor preach, on the 
support of our old ministers and their widows? One sympathizes deeply with our 
pastors under the pressure of so many denominational appeals; but one wonders 
if they could not, without serious extra trouble, devote one morning service a year 
to the claims of the Relief and Annuity Board, or, at least, make an occasional 



14 



MINUTES OF THE 



reference to it in their morning services. Can we expect people to be interested 
in what they never hear about?" 

The Relief Board now cares for returned and retired missionaries. 

M. O. ALEXANDER. 

Submitted Sept. 4, 1934. 

35. The Report of Public Morals and Law Enforcement is made by Sam J. 
Smith. On motion to adopt the report a few words about it are spoken by Mr. 
Smith and it is adopted. 

PUBLIC MORALS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Russia has outlawed her churches. 

In Germany the propaganda against Christianity is being sowed. 

The other day the leader of the youth Press Department under the Hitler 
Government said, "The time has come to take up the fight against Christianity, 
Germans must and shall realize that their conversion to Christianity was a crime 
against the race." 

Our own country has gone off the Gold Standard, and gone on the Liquor 
Standard. Is the day here, spoken of in Psalms 2 which says, "Rulers shall take 
council together against the Lord, but He that sitteth in Heaven shall laugh and 
then speak to them in his wrath." 

We were told a few months ago that the return of liquor would meari, the end 
of crime, that beer and liquor would balance our government budgets, that it 
wc*ild do away with bootleg liquor and bootlegging. 

But what do we see? Do you know of any government's budgets that are 
balanced? Crime is growing by leaps and bounds. Bootleg liquor and bootlegging 
has doubled. Where we saw headlines in the papers a few months ago telling us 
that prohibition was the root of all evils, now we see such as these: "Drunkenness 
in Cities of South Shows Big Increase." "More Liquor Enforcement Officials 
Added." "More Blockade Liquor Captured Than for Many Years." "Since Re- 
peal deaths from accidents from automobiles in 86 leading cities of the U. S. have 
averaged 110 more each month than in the same months of 1932 and 1933." This 
shows clearly, repeal to be the outstanding failure of recent months. So colossal 
is the failure of repeal that another amendment to the constitution is taking shape. 

No city, state or nation will long prosper, who collects revenue from the sale 
of poison, which sends souls to perdition, takes food from the mouths of hungry 
children, makes orphans and widows and other numberless crimes. 

"The man, who for party, forsakes righteousness goes down and the armed 
batallions of God march over him." 

OUR EVIL MOVING PICTURES 

Shame to the Protestant denominations of Christianity, who have slumbered 
and slept so long and waited for the Catholics and Jews to start a crusade against 
the evil moving pictures. 

"The boys and girls of America today are fundamentally fine and wholesome. 
But they do not need, as youth never needs, excessive encouragement to play zhe 
spendthrift with their lives. In the world's greatest book of wisdom this proverb 
is twice set down: "There is a way that seemeth right unto a man, but the end 
thereof are the ways of death." 

"The indictment which I bring against the moving picture industry today is 
that its preponderant influence is such as to make alluring the ultimate ways of 
death." 

"Nowhere has there been assembled quite so much filth as in the movies of 
this present day and they are no worse now than they have been from the be- 
ginning." 

"During the past 14 years the sale of intoxicating liquors have been forbidden 
by the constitution of the United States. During that time about 78 per cent of 
the pictures showed drinking situations which encouraged drinking. In the social 
world drinking is treated humorously." 

"Love, sex and crime form the basic themes of 75 per cent of the pictures. In 
115 pictures recently chosen at random and analyzed, 449 crimes were shown, 83 
of which were murderers and homicides, 59 assaults, 36 gambling, 25 threatening 
with weapons, 21 kidnappings, 18 hold-ups, 12 verbal threats, 11 fighting with 
weapons, and 11 suicides." 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



15 



Every true Baptist should promise him or herself and their God to remain 
away from all motion pictures except those which do not offend decency and 
Christian morality. 

"These remarkable figures from a questionnaire sent out to 500 young men 
and women in our colleges and universities are startling in their revelations: 

Smoke cigarettes, Freshmen, 45 per cent; Seniors, 58 per cent; play cards, 
Freshmen, 56 per cent; Seniors, 75 per cent; drink intoxicating liquors, Freshmen 
38 per cent; Seniors 56 per cent; dance, Freshmen, 58 per cent; Seniors, 75 per 
cent; sexual relation, Freshmen, 65 per cent; Seniors, 75 per cent. 

"In the light of all this, is the world getting better?" 

Let each one of us ask ourselves if we are doing all in our power to prevent 
the physical, moral and spiritual ravages of intemperance. 

The journals and bulletins of our denominational schools should discontinue 
their cigarette advertisements. 

We should elect officers from the least to the greatest who do not wink at 
lawlessness. Liquor, beer, NRA, nor a 1000 other alphabetical symbols and em- 
blems will not bring us out of our economic troubles; but we are promised if "We 
' will draw nigh unto the Lord, he will draw near unto us." 

Respectfully submitted, 
SAM J. SMITH, 

Chairman of Committee. 

36. The Report of the Nominating Committee is made by Sam J. Smith, 
which is adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS 
Chairman of Associational Advisory Committee, Rev. W. L. Warfford, Lex- 
ington, N. C. 

Orphanage Representative, Miss Mary Misenheimer, Lexington, N. C. 
For Committee appointed to prepare reports for next session see page 6. 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE FOR 1935 
R. D. Covington, Thomasville, N. C; J. A. Neilson, Thomasville, N. C; Sam 
J. Smith, Lexington, N. C; L. S. Gaines, Lexington, N. C. 

COMMITTEE ON DIGEST OF CHURCH LETTERS FOR 1935 
Walter L. Warfford, Lexington, N. C; Sam J. Smith, Lexington, N. C. 

37. Rev. Walter L. Warfford, chairman of the Associational Advisory Com- 
mittee, makes the report of the committee, which is adopted. 

He also places before the Body the recommendations of the secretary of the 
Baptist State Convention, asking: this Association to try to raise for the Co-oper- 
ative Program next year the sum of §9,000.00 and for the Mills Home $4,500.00, and 
makes motion that the Association accept these amounts as their goal to be raised 
for these objects during the year 1935. The motion was adopted by the Body. 

38. Mr. Charlie Roach makes motion that the report of the work at Oak 
Grove be included in the minutes, and that after this year they be recognized as 
a Mission of the Jersey church, making regular reports to the association. 

OAK GROVE MISSION 

We, the members of the Oak Grove Mission, together with our beloved pastor, 
Rev. W. C. Darnell, do hereby bring to you our report with the best of wishes for 
the Association. 

During the past year we had one revival, our pastor doing the preaching. 
There were fifteen confessions on faith and seven of these were baptized into the 
Jersey church by the pastor, Rev. Honeycutt. 

We had had during the past year an average attendance in Sunday School of 
46. We have Sunday School every Sunday morning at ten o'clock. We have given 
to Co-operative Program $4.00. We have paid Sunday School Board for litera- 
ture $16.31. Other expenses for Sunday School, $11.00. Our pastor has received 
only about $40.00 for the faithful services he has rendered us. We have preaching 
every second Sunday. We are now in our revival, with our pastor, Rev. W. C. 
Darnell doing the preaching. 

This mission point is located eight miles from Lexington and about five miles 
from Southmont in the Liberty Association. 



16 



MINUTES OF THE 



We are hoping and praying for a greater year for the advancing of Christ's 
Kingdom as we enter this, another associational year. We desire the prayers of 
the Association in the advancement of the Kingdom work here at Oak Grove. 

D. M. SUMMEY, Supt. 

J. R. OWINGS, Asst. Supt. 

M. E. HEDRICK, Sec. and Treas. 

39. It was voted by the Body that the Advisory Committee for the Associa- 
tion be composed of the members recommended from the various churches. 

(See Associational Advisory Committee, page 1.) 

40. Sam J. Smith, Treasurer, reads his report, which is adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT— LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

Last Sunday in August, 1933, to Last Sunday in August, 1934 



Receipts 

Abbotts Creek $ 6.00 

Carolina Avenue 3.90 

Center Hill ; 2.85 

Churchland 6.50 

Denton „ 6.50 

Gravel Hill 1.00 

Holloways 3.15 

Jersey 2.50 

Lexington 26. 0C 

Liberty 3.00 

Lick Creek 7.50 

New Friendship 6.36 

Mills Home 12.00 

Reeds 5.00 

Rich Fork 5.00 

Smith Grove 3.50 

Southside 2.00 

Stoner's Grove 3.00 

Summerville 2.60 

Tabernacle 7^00 

Taylor's Grove 50 

Thomasville 16.00 

Wallburg 4.06 

Walter's Grove 1.35 

Welcome 3.00 

Westfield 2.00 

Sheets Memorial 5.00 



Total Receipts $147.27 

Disbursements 

The Dispatch for Printing Minutes $112.00 

Charity and Children, Printing Programs 5.00 

Piedmont Engraving Co., for cuts 8.00 

Phone calls 1.65 

Postage 4.16 

Stationery 3.50 

Paid Clerk Balance on 1933 Account 4.56 

Retained for my service as Clerk 8.40 



Total Disbursements $147.27 

Balance due Sam J. Smith, Clerk $21.60 



SAM J. SMITH, Treasurer. 
41. The following resolution was offered by Sam J. Smith, which was adopted: 

RESOLUTION OF THANKS 

Resolved: That we, the Liberty Association in session hereby extend to the 
members of Jersey church and other friends of the community our sincere thanks 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



17 



and deep gratitude for their gracious entertainment and hospitality during the 
sessions of this one hundred and second assembly of this body. 

We deeply revere the history, which has been made on these Sacred Grounds, 
which have felt the trcddlng of God's people for nearly 200 years. 

We congratulate the members and friends of the church in the erection of 
their new and splendid Sunday School rooms. 

SAM J. SMITH. 

42. Rev. E. C. Reach, pastor of the Jersey church, extends thanks to the 
friends outside the church, who had helped to entertain the Association. 

43. Rev. Charles Leonard at this time delivers another address on missions, 
especially bringing to the attention of the Body some facts concerning the work 
and customs in Manchura. 

44. Prayer and benediction by G. W. Miller 
The Association adjourned at 4:00 P. M. 

SAM J. SMITH, 
Clerk 



IN REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE WHO HAVE ANSWERED THE ROLL 
CALL SINCE OUR LAST SESSION 

"Blessed are the dead, which die in the Lord" 
"In My Father's House are Many Mansions" 

ABBOTTS CREEK— Mrs. N. R. Teague, Mrs. Phoebe Craven. \ 
CAROLINA AVENUE— Mrs. T. J. York. 
CENTER HILL— Mr. G. M. Wilson. 
CHURCHLAND— Mrs. Martha Wilson. 

DENTON— Mr. J. Caleb Bean, Mrs. R. A. Carroll, Mrs. L. A. Tysinger. 
GRAVEL HILL— Mrs. Ruthie Tucker. 
HOLLOWAYS— Mrs. Elizabeth Leonard. 
JERSEY— Mrs. Crissie Smith. 

LEXINGTON— Mr. J. D. Holt, Mrs. XV. W. Yarbrough, Miss Sallie 
Potts. 

LIBERTY— Mrs. C. A. Kindley, Mrs. M. L. Imbler. 
LICK CREEK— Mr. Eugene Reid, Mr. Stokes Carrick. 
NEW FRIENDSHIP— Mr. Raymond Swaim, Mrs. Flora Willard, Mis, 
Sallie E. Myers. 

REEDS — Mrs. Charlie Fritts, Mrs. J. N. Myers, Mrs. Wesley Lanning, 
Mrs. Margaret Stockton, Mrs. Lundy Sink. 

RICH FORK— Mr. Everett Eddinger, Mrs. Willie Curry. 
SHEETS MEMORIAL— Mr. Ray Johnson. 
SMITH GROVE— Mrs. Susan Brown. 

SOUTHSIDE— Mrs. Lessie Byerly, Mrs. Frank Byerly, Mrs. Maria 
Sebaster, Mrs. W. J. Clodfelter. 

SUMMERVILLE— Mrs. Sampson Owen, Mr. Coy Beck. 
TABERNACLE— Mrs. Wilma Sprouse. 
THOMASVILLE— Mrs. C. C. Pritchard. 

WALTER'S GROVE— Mrs. N. A. Cody, Mrs. Jane Grubb, Mr. Avery 
Woodle. 

j. a. McMillan, 

C. M. ROACH, 
C. R. WOODSON, 
E. F. MUMFORD, 

Committee on Obituaries. 



G. W. MILLER, 
Moderator 



18 



MINUTES OF THE 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

NAME 

Article 1. The name of the body shall be "The Liberty Baptist Association." 

OBJECT 

Article 2. It shall be the object of this association to furnish the gospel (as 
we hold it) to the people within the bounds of the association, and to co-operate 
with the Baptist State Convention. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Article 3. The association shall consist of the officers of the association, pas- 
tors of the churches in the association, and messengers from the churches. Each 
church shall be entitled to three messengers and one additional messenger for 
every 50 members or fraction thereof over and above 100 members. 

OFFICERS 

Article 4. The officers of this association shall be a moderator, vice-modera- 
tor, a treasurer and a clerk, all of whom shall be elected each year by the associa- 
tion at its annual meeting and shall hold office until their successors are elected. 
The duties of the officers shall correspond to the duties of the same officers in 
l'ke organizations, or as defined by the association from time to time. 

BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

Article 5. The association shall elect an Executive Committee each year whose 
duties shall be to look after having the gospel preached in all parts of the associa- 
tion, and to attend to all business in the association between the sessions and to 
make such reports as they deem advisable at the annual meeting of the associa- 
tion. The association may appoint or elect such other boards or committees from 
time to time as circumstances may require. 

TIME OF MEETING 
Article 6. The association shall meet annually, on Tuesday after the first Sun- 
day in September. The moderator may at the request of the Executive Committee 
change the time or the place of meeting of this association when it may be deemed 
by him not expedient to meet at the time or place appointed. 

VACANCIES 

Article 7. The moderator in concurrence with the Executive Committee may 
fill any vacancy occurrying between meetings of the association. 

AMENDMENTS 

Article 8. This constitution may be amended at any regular session of the as- 
sociation by a two -thirds vote of the number present. 

BY-LAWS 

No By-Laws adopted. The association follows Kerfoot's Rules of Order for 
Parliamentary Authority. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



19 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Year WHERE HELD 



PREACHER 



MODERATOR 



CLERK 



Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Peter Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
J. H. Owen 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Azariah Williams 
Ey Civil War 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. H. Owen 
J. L. Pleasant 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Thomas Carrick 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 



Uamestown 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Liberty 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 

2Pine Meeting H 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reecls X Roads 

3Big Creek 

Uamestown 
Liberty 
Holloways 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Reeds X Roads 
Holloways 
New Friendship 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Thomasville 
No Session Held 
Lick Creek 
Abbotts Creek 
Jersey 

Abbotts Creek 
3Big Creek 
2Pine Meeting- H 

New Friendship 

Holloways 

Lick Creek 
4Muddy Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

High Point 

Big- Creek 

Liberty 

Holloways 
I Jersey 
| 4Muddy Creek 
2Pine Meeting H 

Summerville 

Lexington 

Abbotts Creek 

Lick Creek 

Reeds X Roads 

New Friendship 

Jersey 
2Pine Meeting H 

High Point 

Kernersville 

Holloways 

Pleasant Grove 

Denton 
5Piney Grove 

Rich Fork 

Abbotts Creek 

Reeds X Roads 



Geo. W. Purefoy 
Josiah Wiseman 
Eli Carroll 
John Culpepper 
Eli Carroll 
Peter Owen 
Benjamin Lanier 
Eli Carroll 
Josiah Wiseman 
Benjamin Lanier 
Barton Roby 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Alfred Kinney 
Wm Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Azariah Williams 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Z. Minor 
Benjamin Lanier 
Alfred Kinney 
Benjamin Lanier 
Unknown 
Wm. Lambeth 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
J. B. Jackson 
F. H. Jones 
T. W. Tobey 
W. H. Hammer 
On account of 
W. T. Waters 
Benjamin Lanier 
W. H. Hammer 
A. P. Stokes 
Wm. Turner 
W. M. Wingate 
H. Morton 
Thomas Carrick 
A. F. Redd 
C. T. Bailey 
H. W. Reinhart 
J. B. Richardson 
H. W. Reinhart 
Harvev Hatcher 
S. F. Conrad 
Henry Sheets 
S. H. Thompson 
O. F. Gregory 
S. H. Thompson 
J. B. Richardson 
J. B. Richardson 
Henry Sheets 
C. Durham 
W. F. Watson 
J. M. Bennett 
J. K. Fant 
Henry Sheets 
R. T. Bryan 
R. Vandeventer 
J. H. Hilliard 
Henry Sheets 
W. H. Rich 
J. H. Lambert 
S. B. Wilson 
W. H. Rich 



Wm. Burch 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Eli Carroll 
Gershom Tussey 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Benjamin Lanier 
Joseph Spurgeon 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Amos Weaver 
Amos Weaver 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
J. B. Jackson 
J. B. Jackson 
•T. B. Jackson 
Benjamin Lanier 
Conditions caused 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Benjamin Lanier 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
J. H. Brooks 
H. Morton 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Tamer 
Wm. Turner 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
H. W. Reinhart 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
Wm. Turner 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James -Smith 
James Smith 



20 



MINUTES OF THE 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE ASSOCIATION 



Year 


"\T7TJTT7 , T3 T? TJTTT T~J 
W illLiXlll XliliX-llJ 


IT XV Hi xA. l_y JT1 Hi XV 

J 


1901 


Lexington 


C. A. G. Thomas 


1902 


Lick Creek 


Henry Sheets 


1903 


Jersey 


W. A. Smith 


1904 


2Pine Meeting- H 


Geo. P. Harrill 


1905 


New Friendship 


John R. Miller 


1906 


Thomasville 


J. S. Farrier 


1907 


Wiallburg 


Dr. R. T. Vann 


1908 


Denton 


M. L. Kesler 


1909 


Liberty 


S. D. Swaim 


1910 


Orphanage 


O. A. Keller 


1911 


Abbotts Creek 
Stoner's Grove 


G. A. Martin 


1912 


O. A. Keller 


1913 


Rich Fork 


M. L. Kesler 


1914 


Hollo ways 


G. A. Martin 


1915 


Center Hill 


O. A. Keller 


1916 


Wallburg 


T. M. Mercer 


1917 


Smith Grove 


Fred D. Hale 


1918 


Lexington 


M. L. Kesler 


1919 


Denton 


R. E. White 


1 ;( L u 


New Friendship 


J. S. Hard a way 


1921 


Churchland 


M. L. Kesler 


1922 


Summerville 


W. A. Hough 


1923 


Abbotts Creek 


W. L. Barrs 


1924 


Reeds 


C. H. Trueblood 


1925 


Liberty 


C. A. Owens 


1926 


Rich Fork 


E. N. Gardner 


1927 


Thomasville 


H. T. Penry 


1928 


Holloways 


M. L. Kesler 


1929 


Stoner's Grove 


J. M. Hayes 


1930 


Abbotts Creek 


M. L. Kesler 


1931 


Denton 


M. O. Alexander 


1932 


Lexington 


G. A. Martin 


1933 


Lick Creek 


E. F. Mumford 


1934 


| Jersey 


W. L. Warfford 



James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
James Smith 
J. W. Nowell 
J. W. Nowell 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
G. A.' Martin 
O. A. Keller 
O. A. Keller 
R. S. Green 
P. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
R. S. Green 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 
G. Wilson Miller 



CLERK 

Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
P. S. 'Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
P. S. Vann 
t\ S. Vann 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Henry Sheets 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson 
Archibald Johnson) 
Archibald Johnson 
Paul C. Newton 
Paul C. Newton 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smfth 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 
Sam J. Smith 



1 Now High Point; 2 Now Churchland; 3 Now Eldorado; 

4 Now Clemmonsville; 5 Now Wallburg- 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE W. M. U. OF THE 
LIBERTY ASSOCIATION 

The Woman's Missionary Union of the Liberty Association held its twenty- 
eighth annual session with the society of the Reeds Church on April 25, 1934. The 
meeting was called to order with the singing of "All Hail the Power of Jesus' 
Name" at ten o'clock. The Superintendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken, presided. 
The devotional was conducted by Mrs. W. A. Shoaf, who used for her subject 
"Prayer." Rev. E. C. Roach, pastor of the church, gave the visitors a hearty wel- 
come. 

The rollof the societies was then called and sixteen of the twenty-one respond- 
ed with reports, most of which were very encouraging. 
Reports of officers were as follows: 

Mrs. C. C. Pritchard, Personal Service Chairman, was absent on account of 
sickness and her report was read. The report shows that fifteen W. M. S. and a 
number of the Y. W. A., G. A., R. A., and Sunbeams are doing organized personal 
service. Mrs. Pritchard's resignation was presented at this time and prayer was 
offered in her behalf. 

Mrs. W. J. Griffin, Mission Study Chairman, gave report as follows: 

No. Classes held 38; enrollment 235. 

No. Record Cards No. 1, 20; No. 2, 2. 

No. Certificates for official seals 1; seals 1; Honor Certificates 1. 
No. Home and Foreign Certificates 4; seals 6. 
No Reading Cards 5; seals 5. 

No. Certificates Y. W. A. 39; G. A. 130; R. A. 38; S. B. 69. 

No. Seals W. M. S. 226; Y. W. A. 53; G. A. 130; R. A. 14; S. B. 121. 

In connection with her report, Mrs. Griffin placed on display all the different 
kinds of awards and seals and conducted a very thorough discussion of Mission 
Study, assisted by Mrs. Edna Harris. 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



21 



Superintendent reports activities for the year as follows: 

Societies organized — One W. M. S. (Welcome Church) and six Young Peoples 
Societies; Letters written — 169; postals — 25; miles traveled — 960. Held one meeting 
and visited three societies. Attended meeting of Southrn Baptist Convention in 
Washington in May. Attended meeting of our State Convention in November. 
Found it impossible to attend State W. M. U. meeting in March, much to my re- 
gret. 

We did not meet our apportionment, but progress was made along some lines, 
though a few societies failed to function. We hope, however, when proper leader- 
ship can be found they may be restored to their places in our list. We still have 
a great need for leaders for our young people and especially for some men to lead 
the Royal Ambassadors. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 



Receipts 

In Treasury Jan. 1, 1933 $ 8.63 

Contributed during year 22.41 



Total $31.04 

Disbursements 

For postage $12.00 

For programs 1.50 

For Charlotte Division expense 3.00 

For tax on checks 0.08 



Total $16.58 

Balance in treasury Dec. 31, 1933 $14.46 



Mrs. Edna R. Harris, State Corresponding Secretary, gave an inspiring address 
at this time. Her subject was "Wanted." In this the needs of the Master's cause 
were presented \ery forcefully. Committees were appointed. Misses Mozelle Car- 
ter and Viva Young, two of the Reeds young people, sang "The Still Small Voice." 

Adjourned for dinner. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The program was resumed at 1:30 P. M. with the song, "Have Thine Own Way," 
sung by two little girls, Margaret Snyder and Elizabeth Myers, of the Reeds 
Church. Mrs. R. S. Green, Associate Superintendent, presented the purpose and 
success of the Hundred Thousand Club. Mrs. L. E. Teague conducted the devo- 
tional and Rev. R. L. West led in prayer. Mrs. I. P. Frazier presented the work 
of our Training School. Miss Elizabeth Smith, Junior Superintendent, spoke brief- 
ly of work among the young people. Mrs. Chas. Leonard, Missionary to Man- 
churia, brought a marvelous message at this time. Surely our hearts were moved 
as we listened to the great things that are coming to pass on the mission fields. 

Reports of committees are as follows: 

NOMINATIONS 

Superintendent, Miss Sallie L. McCracken, Thomasville, N. C. 
Associate Supt., Mrs. R. S. Green, Thomasville, N. C. 
Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, R. 6, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Junior Superintendent, Miss Elizabeth Smith, R. 6, Lexington, N. C. 
Personal Service Chairman, Mrs. A. F. Warfford, R. 6, Lexington, N. C. 
Mission Study Chairman, Mrs. W. J. Griffin, R. 4, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Nominating committee was composed of Mrs. C. R. Redwine, Mrs. A. F. Warf- 
ford, Miss Florence Motsinger, Mrs. Alda Craver and Mrs. Humphrey. 

TIME AND PLACE 

The committee which was composed of Mrs. R. A. Jennings, Mrs. Lee Smith 
and Mrs. J. Taylor Barnes decided on New Friendship Church for place of meeting 
and the time between the third and fourth Sundays in April, 1934, the day to be 
set later. 



22 



MINUTES OF THE 



OBITUARIES 

The committee — Mrs. E. R. Lanning, Mrs. D. F. Conrad and Mrs. L.. E. Hepler, 
submit the following names: Mrs. J. N. Myers, Mrs. C. H. Fritts, Mrs. J. W. Lan- 
ning, of Reeds; Mrs. W. W. Yarbro, Mrs. John Hodges, of Lexington. In memory 
of these the congregation stood and sang "O Think of the Home Over There." 

COURTESY 

Serving as the courtesy of this body of women we wish to extend our deepest 
thanks to the women of this church, who have so delightfully entertained us today. 
The warm, comfortable building with the lovely flowers, the bountiful dinner, 
served in the good old-fashioned picnic style afforded us ample opportunity for 
rest and fellowship. We wish also to express our thanks to Miss McCracken, our 
Superintendent, (a rising vote) for planning such a splendid program and to the 
ones who have so ably assisted her. It is always a joy to have Mrs. Harris— she 
gives us so much information and inspiration. Last but not least we wish to thank 
the young ladies of- this church who sang for us this A. M. and this afternoon. 

Committee— Mrs. M. O. Alexander, Mrs. R. L. Palmer and Mrs. C. S. Haynes. 

Rev. L. S. Gaines gave the closing devotional. His leading point was "The 
Glorious Vision of the Triumph of Missions" drawn from parts of Hebrews 12, and 
Revelation 7. This was a very fitting message for the close of the day. 



CHURCH DIRECTORIES 

Pastors of the Various Churches 

Name Address Church Member of 

Alexander, M. O., Thomasville, N. C Thomasville 

Barringer, C. D., Salisbury, N. C, Rt. 2 Smith Grove 

Bradley, Eari L., Spencer, N. C Churchland 

Bowman, J. N., Erlanger, N. C Tabernacle 

Clark, Ben F., Thomasville, N. C Carolina Avenue 

Cox, J. A., Central Falls, N. C Gravel Hill 

Gaines, L. S., Lexington, N. C Lexington 

Hanes, J. H., Belews Creek, N. C Westfield 

Hunt, Howard, Star, N. C, R. F. D. 1 Walters Grove 

Honeycutt, R. N., Salisbury, N. C, R. F. D. 7 Jersey 

Mason, B. K., Winston-Salem, N. C, Box 2030 New Friendsmp 

Matthews, L. J., Wallburg, N. C , Wallburg 

Mumford, E. F., High Point, N. C Abbotts Creek 

Neilson, J. A., Thomasville, N. C Mills Home 

Penry, H. T., Southmont, N. C Stoners Grove 

Pickler, J. M., Albemarle, N. C Taylors Grove 

Roach, E. C, Lexington, N. C, Rt. 3 Reeds 

Warfford, Walter L., Lexington, N. C, Box 122 Sheets Memorial 

Wilson, S. B., High Point, N. C Lick Creek 

ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING MEMBERSHIP IN THE ASSOCIATION 
WHO ARE NOT PASTORS 

Name Church Member of Address 

Caldwell, R. N. (Inactive) Taylors Grove New London, N. C. Rt. 2 

Cross, Gilmer (Student) Lexington Lexington, N. C. 

Darnell, W. C. (Inactive) Tabernacle Erlanger, N. C. 

Eddinger, Clyde (Student) Rich Fork Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 1 

Gallimore, A. R. (Missionary) Lexington Canton, China 

Brown, Holt (Student) Center Hill Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6 

Haynes, Grady (Student) Tabernacle Erlanger, N. C. Box 114 

King, J. M. (Inactive) New Friendship Winston-Salem, N. C. Rt. 5 

McMillan, J. A. (Editor) Mills Home Thomasville, N. C. 

Newton, J. D. (Retired) Thomasville Thomasville, N. C. 

ASSISTANT PASTORS AND EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS 

Rev. Walter L. Warfford, Assistant Pastor First Baptist Church, Lexington, N. C. 
No Church in the Association has an Educational Director 



LIBERTY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 



B. Y. P. U. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

President— Walter L. Warfford Lexington, N, C. 

Vice-President— Clyde Eddinger Thomasville, N. C. 

Secretary— Miss Eva Jones Thomasville, N. C. 

Chorister— Jack Freeman Thomasville, N. C. 

Pianist— Virginia Fritts Lexington, N. C. 

Junior-Intermediate Leader — Miss Vera Ruth Thomasville, N. C. 

District Leaders 

Thomasville District— Mrs. Cy Howell Thomasville, N. C. 

Lexington District — Miss Esther Hutchins Lexington, N. C. 

Denton District— R. O. Hedrick Denton, N. C. 



B. Y P. U. PRESIDENTS, LEADERS AND DIRECTORS 

ABBOTTS CREEK, T. Carrick Teague, Kernersville, N. C. Rt. 2, Director; Miss 
Hazel Hayworth, Kernersville, N. C. Rt. 1, Pres. Sr. Union; Miss Mattie E. Teague, 
Kernersville, N. C. Rt. 1, Leader Int. Union; Miss Mary F. Hayworth, High Point, 
N. C. Rt. 2, Leader Jr. Union. 

CAROLINA AVENUE, George Poole, Thomasville, N. C, Director; Floyd Ty- 
singer, Thomasville, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union; H. D. Bradshaw, Thomasville, N. C, 
Leader Int. Union; J. C. Martin, Thomasville, N. O, Leader Jr. Union. 

CENTER HILL, Fred Miller, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6, Pres. Sr. Union. 

CHURCHLAND, Beuna Barnes, Linwood, N. C. Rt. 1, Pres. Sr. Union. 

DENTON, Sherman Lanning, Denton, N. C, Director; Miss Catharine Ward, 
Denton, N. O, Pres. Sr. Union; Miss Roxie Honheimer, Denton, N. O, Leader Int. 
Union. 

JERSEY, Clarence Copley, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 5, Pres. Sr. Union; Miss Eliza- 
beth Smith, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6, Leader Jr. Union. 

LEXINGTON, Fred Golightly, Lexington, N. O, Director; Mrs. Mary Yar- 
borough, Lexington, N. O, Pres. Adult Union; Miss Grace Hinshaw, Lexington, 
N. O, Pres. Sr. Union; A. L. Pickard and L. W. Weller, Lexington, N. C, Leaders 
of Int. Union; Miss Ruth Meachum and Miss Esther Hutchins, Lexington, N. O, 
Leaders of Jr. Union. 

LIBERTY, B. J. May, Cid, N. C. Rt. 1, Director; L. V. Miller, Thomasville, 
N. C. Rt. 3, Pres. Sr. Union; Miss Pauline Watford, Thomasville, N. O, Leader 
Int. Union; Mrs. L. V. Miller, Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 3, Leader Jr. Union. 

MILLS HOME, Pres. Senior No. 1, Minnie Dodd, Thomasville, N. C; Pres. 
Senior No. 2, Elizabeth Coates, Thomasville, N. O; Int. Leader No. 1, Miss Joyner, 
Thomasville, N. O; Int. Leader No. 2, Miss Inez Patterson, Thomasville, N. C; 
Int. Leader No. 3, Mr. C. A. Kearns, Thomasville, N. C; Int. Leade rNo. 4, Miss 
Helen Rowell, Thomasville, N. C; Int. Leader No. 5, Mae Harrison, Thomasville, 
N. O; Jr. Leader No. 1, Bettie Lyon, Thomasville, N. O; Jr. Leader No. 2, Miss 
Lydia Beavers, Thomasville, N. O; Jr. Leader No. 3, Miss Ethel Johnson, Thomas- 
ville, N. C. 

REEDS, Mrs. G. F. Koonts, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 3, Leader Jr. Union. 

RICH FORK, Wilford Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 1, Director; Clyde Ed- 
dinger, Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 1, Pres. Adult Union; Miss Mozelle Clinard, Thomas- 
ville, N. C. Rt. 1, Leader Int. Union. 

SHEETS MEMORIAL, Miss Ethel Jenkins, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6, Director; 
Spurgeon Ayers, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6, Pres. Adult Union; Miss Sarah Parr, Lex- 
ington, N. C. Rt. 6, Pres. Sr. Union; Iva Taylor and Pauline Carrick, Lexington, 
N. C. Rt. 6, Leaders Int. Unions; Miss Mattie Bean, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6, Leader 
Jr. Union. 

SOUTHSIDE, James Swinson, Thomasville, N. O, Director; Mrs. James Swin- 
son, Thomasville, N. O, Leader Jr. Union. 

STONERS GROVE, H. T. Penry, Southmont, N. C, Director. 

TABERNACLE, Mrs. G. J. Haynes, Erlanger, N. C, Director; E. T. McDade, 
Erlanger, N C, Pres. Adult Union; Miss Bessie Perkins, Erlanger, N. C, Pres. Sr. 
Union; Mrs. T. B. Marlyn, Erlanger, Leader Int. Union; Miss Vela Teague and 
Mrs. C. C. Church, Erlanger, N. O, Leaders of Jr. Unions. 

THOMASVILLE, Telford Mailey, Thomasville, N. O, Director; Miss Margaret 
Hicks, Thomasville, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union; Mrs. C. M. Howell, Thomasville, N. C, 
Leader Int. Union; Miss Blanche Gant, Thomasville, N. C, Leader Jr. Union. 

WELCOME, Miss Ruth Hinkle, Welcome, N. C, Pres. Sr. Union. 



24 



MINUTES OF THE 



W. M. IT. ASSOCIATIONAL OFFICERS 

Supt — Miss Sallie McCracken Thomasville, N. C. 

Associate Supt. — Mrs. R. S. Green Thomasville, N. C. 

Sec.-Treas, — Mrs. M. M. Smith Winston-Salem, N. C. Rt. 4 

Junior Supt. — Miss Elizabeth Smith Linwood, N. C. 

Mission Study Chrm.— Mrs. W. J. Griffin Winston- Salem, Rt. 4 

Personal Service Chrm. — Mrs. A. F. Warfford f Lexington, N. C. Rt .6 

LOCAL PRESIDENTS 

CAROLINA AVENUE, Mrs. B. F. Clarke, Thomasville, N. C; DENTON, Mrs. 
R. A. Allen, Denton, N. C; CHURCHLAND, Mrs. Raymond Darr, Linwood, N. C. 
Rt. 1; HOLLOWAYS, Mrs. W. H. Johnson, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6; JERSEY, Mrs. 
C. A. Smith, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6; LEXINGTON, Mrs. G. S. Hartzog, Lexington, 
N. C; LIBERTY, Mrs. Bessie Clodfelter, Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 3; MILLS HOME. 
Mrs. I. G. Greer, Thomasville, N. C; NEW FRIENDSHIP, Mrs. Walter J. Griffin, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. Rt. 4: REEDS, Mrs. G. F. Koonts, Lexington, N. C. Rt. 3; 
RICH FORK, Mrs. W. N. Eddinger, Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 1; SHEETS MEMO- 
RIAL, Mrs. Tom Cooper. Lexington, N. C. Rt. 6; SMITH GROVE, Mrs. Dee Bar- 
ringer, Salisbury, N. C; STONERS GROVE, Mrs. C. C. Wrenn, Southmont, N. C.j 
TABERNACLE, Mrs. G. J. Haynes, Erlanger, N. C; THOMASVILLE, Mrs. M. O. 
Alexander, Thomasville, N. C; WALLBURG, Miss Etta Teague, Wallburg, N. C. 
WELCOME, Mrs. B. R. Zimmerman, Welcome, N. C. 

Y. W. A. COUNSELORS 

DENTON, Mrs. Charles Lambeth, Denton; HOLLOWAYS, Mrs.. L. C. Cross, High 
Rock; JERSEY, Miss Nan Smith, Linwood; LEXINGTON, Mrs. L. S. Gaines, Lex- 
ington; NEW FRIENDSHIP, Mrs. Farris Swaim, 1904 Waughtown St., Winston- 
Salem; TABERNACLE, Mrs. R. K. Smith, Erlanger; THOMASVILLE, Mrs. C. M. 
Howell, Thomasville; WALLBURG, Mrs C. V. Teague, Wallburg; MILLS HOME, 
Miss Helen Rowell, Thomasville. 

G. A. LEADERS 

CHURCHLAND, Miss Clara Mae Shoaf, Linwood, Rt. 1; JERSEY, Miss Sadie 
Sharpe, Linwood; LEXINGTON, Mrs. D. S. Bennett, Lexington; MILLS HOME, 
Naomi Schell, Jr. G. A., Miss Beatrice Council, Leader, Thomasville; Lockett Jr. G. A. 
Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville: Alda Grayson Int. G. A., Mrs. A. C. Lovelace, 
Thomasville; Vally Page, Int. G. A., Mrs. R. D. Covington, Thomasville; NEW 
FRIENDSHIP, Miss Ola Crowder, Rt. 5, Winston- Salem; SHEETS MEMORIAL 
Mrs. J. W. Byars, Lexington; SMITH GROVE, Mrs. Clara Broadway, Rt. 1, Linwood, 
STONERS GROVE, Mrs. A. F. Warfford, Southmont; TABERNACLE, Mrs. Violet 
Cline, Erlanger; THOMASVILLE, Int., Mrs. H. G. Dickens, Thomasville; Jr., Miss 
Blanch Gant, Thomasville; WALLBURG, Miss Stella Cook, Wallburg. 

R. A. LEADERS 

CHURCHLAND, Graham Barnes, Linwood; HOLLOWAYS, Mrs. Frankie 
Briggs, Rt. 1, High Rock; JERSEY, Claud Smith, Rt. 1, Linwood; MILLS HOME, 
Vance R. A., Mrs. I. G. Greer, Thomasville: Lake R. A., Miss Lucille Hamby, Thom- 
asville: Gallimore R. A., Mrs. I. P. Frazier, Thomasville; NEW FRIENDSHIP, Miss 
Lois Nifong, Rt. 4, Winston Salem; SMITH GROVE, Miss Irene Beck, Rt. 7, Sal- 
isbury; STONERS GROVE, Miss Blanche Wrenn, Southmont; TABERNACLE, 
Mrs. Paul Solomon, Erlanger; THOMASVILLE, Mrs C. M. Howell, Thomasville; 
WALLBURG, Miss Evangeline Pardue, Wallburg. 

SUNBEAM LEADERS 

ABBOTTS CREEK, Miss Velna Teague, Kernersville, N. C. Rt. 1; CHURCH- 
LAND, Miss Margaret Shoaf, Linwood, N. C. Rt. 1; HOLLOWAYS, Mrs. G. C. 
Palmer, High Rock, N. C. Rt. 1; JERSEY, Mrs. Kenneth Lanning, Linwood, N. C.j 
LEXINGTON, Mrs. L. W. Weller, Lexington, N. C; NEW FRIENDSHIP, Mrs. C. 

F. Motsinger, Winston-Salem, N. C. Rt. 5; RICH FORK, Miss Zelma Clinard, 
Thomasville, N. C. Rt. 1; MILLS HOME, Miss Mary Cook, Thomasville, N. C.j 
SHEETS MEMORIAL, Mrs. Tom Cooper, Lexington, N. C; SMITH GROVE, Mrs. 

G. S. Smith, Linwood, N. C. Rt. 1; STONERS GROVE, Miss Dorothy Yow, South- 
mont, N. C; TABERNACLE, Mrs. Clyde Hurst, Erlanger, N. C; THOMASVILLE, 
Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville, N. C; WALLBURG, Mrs. William King, Wall- 
burg, N. C; WELCOME, Mrs. Ira Snider, Welcome, N. C. 



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